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Found 619 Collections

 

#TUTeach

Grade 4: Rocks and Minerals

Program Description: Students will become real life geologists and museum curators! The Cornerstone experience begins at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History with an interactive, hands-on learning experience in Q?rius jr.: a discovery room. While at the museum, students will learn what it means to be a geologist, and closely examine a chosen rock or mineral. Finally, students will have the opportunity to explore the Janet Annenberg Hooker Hall of Geology, Gems, & Minerals. Transferring their learning back to the classroom, these fourth grade geologists will create their very own rock/mineral museum display.

Elsy Rivera
17
 

Rocks and Minerals Cornerstone Field Trip

#TUTeach

Grade 4: Rocks and Minerals

Program Description: Students will become real life geologists and museum curators! The Cornerstone experience begins at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History with an interactive, hands-on learning experience in Q?rius jr.: a discovery room. While at the museum, students will learn what it means to be a geologist, and closely examine a chosen rock or mineral. Finally, students will have the opportunity to explore the Janet Annenberg Hooker Hall of Geology, Gems, & Minerals. Transferring their learning back to the classroom, these fourth grade geologists will create their very own rock/mineral museum display.

Anita Cauchi
17
 

Cloudy With a Chance of Fun

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring clouds. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about clouds, read articles about clouds, and listen to a read aloud called Brave Irene who faces some very interesting weather. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
22
 

May the Road Rise Up to Meet You: St. Patty's Day Fun

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring St. Patrick's Day. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about St. Patrick's Day, read articles about magic folk, and listen to the read aloud Rainbow Fish. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
40
 

Digital Science Games, Apps, and Simulations

Digital learning resources from the Smithsonian Science Education Center

Smithsonian Science Education Center
17
 

Explore Smithsonian - Video Series

Join us for a behind-the-scenes look at the science and research of the Smithsonian Institution. Each video in this series is designed for use in the classroom by highlighting a driving question and following Smithsonian scientists as they go about the process of science. Viewers are taken from the waters of the Chesapeake Bay at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, to the Chandra Telescope Mission Control Center at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Viewers even get to visit the Smithsonian Institution’s National Zoological Park to learn about the types of adaptations pandas, like Bao Bao, have for their distinctive bamboo diet.

Smithsonian Science Education Center
17
 

Good Thinking! The Science of Teaching Science - Video Series

This original web series is designed to support K-12 science educators through targeted short-format videos that explore common student ideas and misconceptions about a range of science topics such as energy, chemical reactions, and natural selection, as well as pedagogical subjects like student motivation and the myth of left and right-brained people.

Smithsonian Science Education Center
16
 

Mosquito! Podcasting Module

In this modular, multi-part lesson, learners will focus on a Sidedoor podcast discussing mosquitoes. Learners will focus on the content the podcast is delivering and then analyze the podcast for production techniques. The content of the podcast will give the team a base understanding for the focus of their own podcast.

#YAGSidedoor2019

Smithsonian Science Education Center
7
 

Quick Tips for Teachers

"Quick Tips: Resources for Teachers” is a series of short videos providing down-to-earth advice and instructional tips to teachers of STC™, our signature science curriculum. Each “Quick Tip” offers practical suggestions by experienced teachers for handling materials or managing classrooms in science investigations.
Smithsonian Science Education Center
14
 

Seeds and Seedlings

Intro to study of Plant Growth

Randi Miller
12
 

Bats: One Magnificent Mammal

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring my favorite animal, bats. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about bats, read articles about bats, and listen to the read aloud Stellaluna. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
29
 

New Almaden quicksilver mine

This collection is a resource for those interested in the history and science of mercury mining at New Almaden quicksilver mine. (more to come)

Daniel LaFlash
10
 

Sharks: Friend or Foe?

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring Sharks. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about sharks, read articles about sharks, and listen to the read aloud Clark the Shark. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
30
 

Art and the Electromagnetic Spectrum

This lesson will help students understand applications of electromagnetic radiation in art conservation. In particular, students will learn art conservators use ultraviolet, infrared, visible light, and x-radiation to examine artwork. Properties of each form of radiation and its uses in art conservation will be introduced. Students will then solve problems. 

You will find guiding questions included in the additional info section of each artwork.

Shantelle Jones-Williams
10
 

¡Descubra! Hispanic Heritage

This collection features bilingual (English/Spanish) activities from ¡Descubra!, the Smithsonian Latino Center’s national public education program for kids, teens, and families. These activities were featured at previous Smithsonian Latino Center Hispanic Heritage festivals celebrating Latino art, music, and cultures. These resources can serve teachers and students grades 2-5, 6-8, and high school Spanish.

The activities help participants place themselves in the role of an artist, whether a poet, musician, or sculptor. There are also fun activities for caregivers and families in capturing family music memories through oral histories and archiving special memories with photographs. Through active learning and problem solving, students are fully engaged and better able to understand concepts being presented. This collection also includes video performances and interviews with Latino animators, artists, curators, dancers, and even educators, among others.  

¡Descubra! Hispanic Heritage promotes Latino arts and culture contributions while showcasing opportunities to become involved in cultural representation and different interests in these areas.


Esta colección resalta actividades bilingües de ¡Descubra!, el programa nacional educativo del Centro Latino Smithsonian para niños, adolecentes y familias. Estas actividades fueron presentadas en festivales de herencia hispana previos del Centro Latino Smithsonian que celebraban arte, música y cultura hispana. Estos recursos les pueden servir a maestros y estudiantes de grados 2-5, 6-8, y de clases de español de preparatoria (high school).

Las actividades ayudan a participantes imaginase en un papel de artista, fuese un poeta, un músico o escultor. Encontrará actividades divertidas para cuidadores y familias que captan memorias musicales de familia a través de entrevistas y otra sobre como archivar memorias especiales con fotos. A través del aprendizaje y resolviendo problemas, los estudiantes pueden entender mejor las ideas que se les presentan. Esta colección también incluye videos de presentaciones y entrevistas de animadores, artistas, bailarines, curadores y hasta educadores, además de otros.

¡Descubra! Hispanic Heritage resalta las contribuciones de la comunidad hispana al arte y la cultura estadounidense mientras promueve oportunidades para involucrarse en la representación cultural y las diferentes áreas dentro del campo.

Smithsonian Latino Center
43
 

Beyond Monarchs: Animal Migration

This collection starts with monarch butterflies and their migration. My hope was to remind the second graders about what they have already learned about monarchs. 

Once the students' background knowledge is activated then the students can participate in the Tuning In activity. Students will analyze the art piece using the Harvard's Project Zero Thinking Routine: See, Think, Wonder. 

Once the students have made their thinking visible then the class will find more out by learning about the art piece from the artist and learning about bird migrations. The students will engage in the Harvard Global Thinking Routine The 3 Ys.

To push the students beyond flying animals the Going Further section will expose the  students to migrations of animals on land, air, and see. The students will end this section using the Thinking Routine Think, Puzzle, Explore. Students can then have time to research about animals on their own.

Jennifer Woollven
19
 

Raindrops Keep Falling on My Head

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring rain. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about weather, the water cycle and thunderstorms. Families can also read articles about rain, learn about how native peoples interact with rain, and listen to a read aloud in the hopes to keep families from feeling bored. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
50
 

Astrophotography: Student Activity in STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics)

In this student activity, you’ll use specialized image processing software to bring out visual details from images of objects like the Moon, Sun, star clusters, nebulas, and galaxies. After you analyze your own image(s), you’ll have an opportunity to research related astronomy information and to share your scientific and artistic interpretations of your telescope data.
Jessica Radovich
15
 

Journey through an Exploded Star: An Online Interactive

In this collection, students will explore the life cycle of stars and learn about the connection between elements and space. They'll explore real data that provides evidence for the dispersal of several elements produced by the explosion of massive stars, specifically through the Cassiopeia A supernova. Then they’ll put their knowledge into practice by navigating the remains of the supernova in the online interactive “Journey through an Exploded Star.”

  1. The activity begins with “DISCOVER." The students will go through a series of slides, learning first how the visible spectrum of light is only a small part of the entire electromagnetic spectrum, about the different telescopes scientists use to view the electromagnetic radiation across that spectrum, and finally how they've used that data to form a composite view of our universe, specifically through a 3D model of the Cassiopeia A supernova.
  2. In the "EXPLORE" activity, students examine the 3D visualization of data, compiled by astrophysicist Tracey DeLaney, to understand how and why scientists study supernovas such as Cassiopeia A: to gain a comprehensive picture of the cosmos.
  3. The “PLAY” online interactive then takes the students on a first-person flight through the center of this exploded star. The interactive is split into two parts: The first part is a 2 minute guided fly-through, where Kim Arcand, project lead of the original 3D visualization found in the collection, explains the different forms of light and the elements that are traceable under those spectrums. The second is a free explore option, where students are able to manipulate the different spectrums by adjusting filters as they choose. Both parts of the interactive reinforce what they’ve previously learned within the collection about light across the EMS. This interactive works across browsers and requires no software downloads. Also included is a 360 video tour that works on mobile devices and Google Cardboard.
  4. Finally, three extension activities are included. The first allows students to take photographs using real MicroObservatory robotic telescopes located at Smithsonian Observatory sites in Cambridge, Massachusetts and Amado, Arizona to create their very own authentic astrophotographs. They’ll use specialized image processing software to bring out visual details from images of objects like the Moon, Sun, star clusters, nebulas, and galaxies. The second, "Recoloring the Universe," is a suite of resources that use astrophysical data to teach basic coding. The third resource, "How to Be a Scientist: Careers in Astronomy" highlights the career and data visualization work of astronomer Kimberly Arcand. 

This online activity could be used to augment study about the forms of radiation light can take, learning about supernovae and what happens after a star explodes, as well as learning about some of the different careers in science that are available (astrophysicists, astrophotographers, engineers, and visualization experts). As with all Learning Lab collections, it is built to be freely modified and adapted to fit your specific needs. 

Jessica Radovich
22
 

MicroObservatory: A guide to Observing the Universe

MicroObservatory is a network of automated telescopes that can be controlled over the Internet. In this collection, students will learn how they can control these telescopes themselves, using many of the same technologies that NASA uses to capture astronomical images by controlling telescopes in space. After gathering their very own images of space, students will learn the steps professional astronomers take to process the astronomical masterpieces so often seen from NASA, and then have the opportunity to create their very own!

Jessica Radovich
6
 

ACCESS SERIES | Galaxy Quest

IMPORTANT: Click on the "i" for information icon and the paperclip icons as you move through the collection.

Have you ever wondered what's going on out there in the universe? Would you like to discover exciting things about planets, stars, and galaxies? Today, we will go on a GALAXY QUEST to EXPLORE THE UNIVERSE!

RATIONALE | Digital technology has transformed how we explore the Universe. We now have the ability to peer into space right from our homes and laptop computers. Telescopes, photography, and spectroscopy remain the basic tools that scientists—astronomers and cosmologists—use to explore the universe, but digital light detectors and powerful computer processors have enhanced these tools. Observatories in space—like the Hubble Space Telescope—have shown us further into space then we have ever seen before.

EDUCATORS | For the LESSON PLAN of the original "Galaxy Quest" << CLICK HERE >>

Lesson Objectives:
1. Process and save at least one digital image of a galaxy or space image (with caption)
2. Create a three-dimensional astronomy sculpture (galaxy or other space body, space alien, plant, animal)
3. Create a digital astronomy sculpture (galaxy or other space body, space alien, plant, animal)
4. Visit the Explore the Universe exhibition at NASM and identify Hubble parts (mirror, lens, spectroscope)

Learning Objectives:
1.     What a galaxy is
2.     What a space telescope is
3.     Learn how to open an image on the computer and process it
4.     Socialize well in the museum setting


Tags: decision-making, self-determination, access, disability, accessibility, neurodiversity, special education, SPED, out of school learning, informal learning, cognitive, social skills, engagement, passion, creativity, empowerment, All Access Digital Arts Program 


Jessica Radovich
77
 

AFRICAN COSMOS

Put the ARTS in STEM - From Egypt to South Africa, take a brief tour of the African Cosmos  and have your students discover the intersection of Art and Astronomy in the southern hemisphere.   Explore constellations only seen on the African continent.  See why the Goliath beetle became a symbol of rebirth for the Egyptian scarab.  Learn about celestial navigation by people and animals. 

Create Your Own Constellation!  Request Activity sheets for your classroom.

Submit your class constellations to our Student Gallery and be a part of your own school's online exhibition!


Jessica Radovich
73
457-480 of 619 Collections