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‘Hamilton: The Exhibition’ Opens in Chicago to Eager Fans

Smithsonian Magazine

On Saturday, April 27, hundreds of fans waiting in line for the opening of "Hamilton: The Exhibition" received a special surprise: The man behind the hit Broadway musical, Lin-Manuel Miranda himself, appeared on the scene with donuts in hand, ready to reward the so-called "Hamilfans" who had braved the dismal Chicago weather with sweet treats and selfies.

As Michael Paulson reports for The New York Times, a specially constructed 35,000-square-foot structure on Chicago’s Lake Michigan shoreline is the first locale to host an immersive, surprisingly educational exhibition on "Hamilton." Dubbed "Hamilton: The Exhibition," the show features an in-depth look at the eponymous Founding Father’s life, correcting historical inaccuracies seen in the musical while simultaneously fleshing out events and themes raised by Miranda’s Tony Award-winning creation.

Catering to the musical enthusiasts sure to flock to the space, the exhibit also includes an audio guide narrated by Miranda and original cast members Phillipa Soo and Christopher Jackson, a reworked instrumental version of the soundtrack recorded by a 27-piece band, and 3-D footage of Miranda leading the Washington, D.C. cast in a performance of the musical’s opening number.

Amazingly, "Hamilton: The Exhibition" cost $1 million more to launch than its Broadway predecessor. Built to travel (at least with the aid of 80 moving trucks), the show carries a hefty price tag of $13.5 million, as opposed to the musical’s $12.5 million—a fact that may account for its high admission rates, which stand at $39.50 for adults and $25 for children. Although the exhibit’s Chicago run currently has no fixed end-date, Jeffrey Seller, the musical's lead producer and the individual in charge of this latest venture, tells Paulson it will likely stay in the Windy City for several months before moving on to cities such as San Francisco and Los Angeles.

According to the Chicago Tribune’s Steve Johnson, Miranda, who served as an artistic advisor for the exhibition, describes the show as a “choose-your-own-adventure” experience. Those hoping to delve into the details of the Revolutionary War, federalism and early 19th-century fiscal policy will want to pay attention to wall text and audio narration, while those more interested in the musical will enjoy interactive visuals, games and set pieces crafted by exhibit designer David Korins.

Writing for the Chicago Sun-Times, Miriam Di Nunzio highlights several of the exhibition’s 18 galleries: There’s the “Schuyler Mansion” ballroom, dominated by bronze statues of Alexander Hamilton, the Schuyler sisters, and George and Martha Washington, and a recreation of the Battle of Yorktown that Seller, in an interview with the Sun-Times’ Mary Houlihan, likens to “a giant [animated] Risk board.” Also of note are a “Hurricane” room centered on Hamilton’s youth in St. Croix, a gallery dedicated to Eliza Hamilton’s efforts to ensure her husband’s legacy following his death in 1804, and a “Duel” space featuring life-size statues of Hamilton and Aaron Burr with their pistols raised.

In essence, "Hamilton: The Exhibition" strives to fill the historical gaps left by its namesake musical.

“I couldn't even fit Ben Franklin in my show,” Miranda tells the Daily Beast’s Kimberly Bellware. “I couldn't get the state of Pennsylvania in. But here, we can do a deeper dive on slavery in the north and the south. We can talk about Native American contributions, [and] we can talk about women in the war effort.”

As Bellware observes, one such nod to these hidden histories is a statue of an enslaved woman standing at the edge of the Schuyler ballroom. Rather than providing a cursory overview of slavery in colonial America, the accompanying audio narration urges visitors to consider the figure as an individual, asking, “Where was she from? Who did she love? What were her dreams?”

Focusing on Hamilton specifically, The New York Times’ Jacobs points toward an unassuming sign clarifying the “ten-dollar Founding Father without a father”’s stance on slavery: Although the song “Who Lives, Who Dies, Who Tells Your Story” finds Eliza stating, “I speak out against slavery / You could have done so much more if you / only had— / Time,” the exhibit notes, “The real Hamilton wasn’t an abolitionist, but he did oppose slavery.”

It’s worth noting that "Hamilton: The Exhibition" has its flaws: For the Chicago Tribune, Johnson notes that the show features a cast of reproductions, as the warehouse’s climate has yet to prove stable enough to house actual artifacts, and argues that it too often relies on heavy blocks of text to convey the history behind the musical’s catchy tunes. Still, Johnson concludes, these are just “quibbles.” Overall, “there are a thousand choices on display in this exhibition, and almost all of them at least satisfy, while a great number go beyond that to surprise and delight.”

In the words of "Hamilton"’s King George III—the musical's resident source of comic relief—you’ll be back.

ʻAe Kai: A Culture Lab on Convergence

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Program
A weekend-long creative experience featuring 50+ artists, scholars and cultural practitioners from Hawaiʻi, the Pacific Islands and beyond 🏄🏾 Details: http://smithsonianapa.org/aekai The Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center is pleased to present ʻAe Kai: A Culture Lab on Convergence on July 7-9, 2017 in Honolulu, Hawaiʻi. ʻAe Kai will take place in the former site of Foodland in Ala Moana Center, an 18,000 sq ft supermarket situated in the neighborhood between Waikiki and Kaka‘ako, and will explore the meeting points of humanity and nature in Hawaiʻi, the Pacific Islands and beyond. Following 2016’s transformational culture labs – CrossLines in Washington, D.C. and CTRL+ALT in New York City – ‘Ae Kai will continue SmithsonianAPA's practice of community building through curated artmaking. The biggest Culture Lab to date, most of ‘Ae Kai’s participants are based or rooted in Hawaiʻi, with the majority of artists identifying as Pacific Islanders. FEATURING: AARON KAWAI’AE’A w/ TAVANA Acrylic works with traditional & modern themes ABIGAIL KAHILIKIA ROMANCHAK w/ CHARLES COHAN Traditional printmaking with a contemporary vision ADAM LABUEN w/ ALEX ABALOS Work that blends science and fantastical portraiture ADRIENNE KEAHI PAO Photography exploring fantasy & identity ALOHA GOT SOUL Excavating rare & forgotten Hawaiian music ANGEL CHANG Fashion inspired by rural Chinese handweaving BRANDY NĀLANI MCDOUGALL Tracing indigeneity & colonialism through bilingual poetry CALVIN HOE Mahi ʻAi Kalo (taro farmer) & artisan CARL FRANKLIN KA’AILĀ’AU PAO Multidisciplinary art exploring kaona and wā CHAD SHOMURA w/ LINH HUỲNH Experiments in stranger intimacy CHARLES PHILIPPE JEAN-PIERRE Paintings & illustrations that contrast perception & reality CHELOVE DC-based street art investigating indigeneity today CRAIG SANTOS PEREZ Poetic bridges from Guam to Hawaiʻi to California DR. KEANU SAI Complicating the Hawaiian kingdom's historical narrative HAVANA LIBRE Uncovering Cuba's hidden surf culture JAHRA ‘RAGER’ WASASALA Movement & poetry rooted in New Zealand & Fiji JESS X. SNOW, KIT YAN & PETER PA Queer Asian American storytelling through visual poetry JOCELYN KAPUMEALANI NG Special effects & poetry with a fascination with the dark JOHN “PRIME” HINA Hawaiian storytelling through street art KATELIN LILI’INOE BRANCO Illustrations inspired by animal/human/environmental interactions KATHY JETÑIL-KIJINER Poetry & performance exploring life in the Marshall Islands KAYLA BRIËT Film & music based on Native American traditions & futures KEALOPIKO Contemporary fashion rooted in traditional Hawaiian practices LEHUA M. TAITANO Art & poetry exploring queer Chamoru identity LÉULI LUNAʻI ESHRĀGHI Multi-practice art centered on indigeneity & queer futures LISA JARRETT Comparing Self & Other as an American Black woman LOW LEAF Bridging Los Angeles & the Philippines through DIY music MAIKA’I TUBBS Sculptures from found materials to explore consumption & ecology MAILE ANDRADE Multimedia exploring Native Hawaiian creative expression MASPAZ The power of typography & color through graffiti MAZI MUTAFA Hip hop as a tool for transformative learning MONICA JAHAN BOSE Collaborative fabric & printmaking to explore gender & climate change NAOKO WOWSUGI Reciprocal exchange between art & the world NICOLE A. MOORE The intersection of African American history & Hawaiʻi PŌHAKU STONE Revitalizing ancient surf & he'e hōlua (Hawaiian sledding) RICKY TAGABAN Material culture to explore traditional & contemporary Native Alaskan life ROSANNA RAYMOND Multi-disciplinary art focused on contemporary Pacific Island culture SHIZU SALDAMANDO Portraits about social constructs of identity & subcultures SID M. DUENAS Multi-platform art that challenges the effectiveness of language SLOANE LEONG Sci-fi & futurism from an Asian Latina Polynesian cartoonist SOLOMON ENOS Illustration/sculpture/painting depicting Hawaiian fantasy TERISA SIAGATONU Queer Samoan poetry & healing arts THE SURF PROFESSOR Crafting the Papa Heʻe Nalu (traditional native Hawaiian surfboard) WIENA LIN Sensory experiences about material culture & tech waste WOODEN WAVE Murals & illustrations that merge fantasy & sustainability

Éloges and Other Poems

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Book jacket design for Éloges and Other Poems by St. John Perse, published by Pantheon. The cover design has a black background and features the text "Éloges" in white, yellow, and red letters, with the red letter "l" elongated to the top. Directly below "and Other Poems" appears in smaller red text, followed by "St.-John Perse" in yellow and "translated by Louise Varèse" in red on the lines below. "Bollingen Series LV" appears at the bottom left in white, and "Pantheon" directly below in red text. A small red circle is seen at the bottom left. On the spine, the title is printed vertically in yellow, with "By St.-John Perse" below in white. Verso includes flap designs with white backgrounds and black text—left flap contains a summary of the book and price ($2.00); right flap contains information about the Bollingen series and other works by St.-John Perse.

Électricité

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Électricité

Smithsonian American Art Museum

“Weeds are flowers, too…�: A Deaccession Project at the American Art and Portrait Gallery Library

Smithsonian Libraries
  –This blog post was contributed by Sara Donovan, summer 2019 intern at the Smithsonian AA/PG Library. Sara is finishing her undergraduate degree in history at the College of William more »

“Tin Pan Dragon� at Renwick

Smithsonian Insider

Duane Flatmo discusses his work Tin Pan Dragon, a 23-foot animated sculpture built of steel tubing and recycled aluminum, in the exhibition “No Spectators: The […]

The post “Tin Pan Dragon” at Renwick appeared first on Smithsonian Insider.

“Off the Beaten Track�: A road trip through the Archives of American Art

Smithsonian Insider

The first mental image of Jackson Pollock is often of a balding middle-aged artist, back bent with cigarette dangling while flinging chaotic swirls of paint […]

The post “Off the Beaten Track”: A road trip through the Archives of American Art appeared first on Smithsonian Insider.

“Greek Slave,� the Washington, D.C. Legacy of Hiram Powers’ 1840s masterpiece

Smithsonian Insider

Look at her. Standing solemnly, violated yet dignified, nude but chaste, in the room William Wilson Corcoran arranged specifically for her, his favorite artwork. She’s […]

The post “Greek Slave,” the Washington, D.C. Legacy of Hiram Powers’ 1840s masterpiece appeared first on Smithsonian Insider.

À La Mode

Smithsonian American Art Museum
The now-defunct conceptual art group Asco coined the phrase “No Movie” to refer to their fabricated film stills of nonexistent films. One such production, À la Mode, features a glamorous Patssi Valdez sandwiched between two men (Gronk and Harry Gamboa) as if to suggest a love-triangle movie plot. Asco circulated this image to news outlets where it was published as evidence of a real film. Asco’s media interventions, which placed Chicanos in control of their own public images, reveal the hunger for a broader range of Latino representations.

Our America: The Latino Presence in American Art, 2013

¡Salud! to the Mexican-American Wine Revolution

Smithsonian Magazine
Ceja Vineyards breathes new life into Napa Valley’s wine industry

¡LIBERTAD PARA LOS PRISONERAS POLITICAS

Smithsonian American Art Museum

¡Guerra!

Smithsonian American Art Museum

“Orale ese Vato”

National Museum of American History
As this paño humorously titled Orale ese vato (Spanish for roughly, right on, man) shows, one characteristic of Chicano art is that it avidly consumes and reconfigures both American and Mexican pop culture with its own slang, looks, and attitude. A paño is a hand-drawn handkerchief traditionally designed by Chicano prisoners. Like a letter that retells memories of both good and bad times, paños are often mailed as gifts to friends and loved ones. Valued as a vibrant popular art that overlaps with muralism, tattoo design, graffiti, and auto airbrushing, paños and their makers are receiving increased exposure for their visual storytelling abilities. An illustrator and a muralist known for depicting Chicano themes, Walter Baca (1947-1993) designed this paño in New Mexico in 1992.

young love

National Museum of American History
Rudolf Eickemeyer, Jr. (1862–1932) used a wide variety of printing processes, printing out some negatives in more than one medium. In his lectures, he pointed out that this approach to photography was important because in the hands of a photographer who “lives and understands the infinitely varied moods of nature, photography can be made to express and interpret them.” In correspondence with Dr. Olmstead at the Smithsonian, as the presentation of his gifts and bequest to the museum was being arranged, Eickemeyer wrote: “The collection illustrates the use of every important process and will, I believe, be of real educational value.”

The first of the Eickemeyer photographic collection came to the National Museum’s Department of Arts and Industries (the “Castle”), Division of Graphic Arts in 1922 at the close of a large exhibition of Eickemeyer’s work at the Anderson Gallery in New York. It was a gift from the photographer of five framed prints from the New York show that he considered representative of his work.

In 1929, Eickemeyer gave the Smithsonian 83 framed prints (including copies of the prints that he had previously given the museum), 15 portfolios, his medals and awards, and several miscellaneous photographic paraphernalia. In 1930, he made a will bequeathing most of his remaining prints, negatives, photographic equipment and other objects relating to his 30-year career as a photographer to the Smithsonian Institution.

Upon Eickemeyer’s death in 1932, an accession consisting primarily of photographic equipment from his studio came to the Smithsonian. Included in the bequest were 2 cameras, several lenses, scales, timers, printing frames, plate holders, dry mounters and a lecture case with slide projector and hand-colored lantern slides. Also included were 43 albums, journals and portfolios and assorted negatives and contact prints, many marked “discards.” There are 58 albums, notebooks and portfolios in the collection. Eickemeyer requested in his will that his gifts and bequests be called The Rudolf Eickemeyer, Jr. Collection.

young intellectual

National Museum of American History
Rudolf Eickemeyer, Jr. (1862–1932) used a wide variety of printing processes, printing out some negatives in more than one medium. In his lectures, he pointed out that this approach to photography was important because in the hands of a photographer who “lives and understands the infinitely varied moods of nature, photography can be made to express and interpret them.” In correspondence with Dr. Olmstead at the Smithsonian, as the presentation of his gifts and bequest to the museum was being arranged, Eickemeyer wrote: “The collection illustrates the use of every important process and will, I believe, be of real educational value.”

The first of the Eickemeyer photographic collection came to the National Museum’s Department of Arts and Industries (the “Castle”), Division of Graphic Arts in 1922 at the close of a large exhibition of Eickemeyer’s work at the Anderson Gallery in New York. It was a gift from the photographer of five framed prints from the New York show that he considered representative of his work.

In 1929, Eickemeyer gave the Smithsonian 83 framed prints (including copies of the prints that he had previously given the museum), 15 portfolios, his medals and awards, and several miscellaneous photographic paraphernalia. In 1930, he made a will bequeathing most of his remaining prints, negatives, photographic equipment and other objects relating to his 30-year career as a photographer to the Smithsonian Institution.

Upon Eickemeyer’s death in 1932, an accession consisting primarily of photographic equipment from his studio came to the Smithsonian. Included in the bequest were 2 cameras, several lenses, scales, timers, printing frames, plate holders, dry mounters and a lecture case with slide projector and hand-colored lantern slides. Also included were 43 albums, journals and portfolios and assorted negatives and contact prints, many marked “discards.” There are 58 albums, notebooks and portfolios in the collection. Eickemeyer requested in his will that his gifts and bequests be called The Rudolf Eickemeyer, Jr. Collection.

young girl with bottle

National Museum of American History

young gentleman

National Museum of American History
Rudolf Eickemeyer, Jr. (1862–1932) used a wide variety of printing processes, printing out some negatives in more than one medium. In his lectures, he pointed out that this approach to photography was important because in the hands of a photographer who “lives and understands the infinitely varied moods of nature, photography can be made to express and interpret them.” In correspondence with Dr. Olmstead at the Smithsonian, as the presentation of his gifts and bequest to the museum was being arranged, Eickemeyer wrote: “The collection illustrates the use of every important process and will, I believe, be of real educational value.”

The first of the Eickemeyer photographic collection came to the National Museum’s Department of Arts and Industries (the “Castle”), Division of Graphic Arts in 1922 at the close of a large exhibition of Eickemeyer’s work at the Anderson Gallery in New York. It was a gift from the photographer of five framed prints from the New York show that he considered representative of his work.

In 1929, Eickemeyer gave the Smithsonian 83 framed prints (including copies of the prints that he had previously given the museum), 15 portfolios, his medals and awards, and several miscellaneous photographic paraphernalia. In 1930, he made a will bequeathing most of his remaining prints, negatives, photographic equipment and other objects relating to his 30-year career as a photographer to the Smithsonian Institution.

Upon Eickemeyer’s death in 1932, an accession consisting primarily of photographic equipment from his studio came to the Smithsonian. Included in the bequest were 2 cameras, several lenses, scales, timers, printing frames, plate holders, dry mounters and a lecture case with slide projector and hand-colored lantern slides. Also included were 43 albums, journals and portfolios and assorted negatives and contact prints, many marked “discards.” There are 58 albums, notebooks and portfolios in the collection. Eickemeyer requested in his will that his gifts and bequests be called The Rudolf Eickemeyer, Jr. Collection.

young farmhands

National Museum of American History
Rudolf Eickemeyer, Jr. (1862–1932) used a wide variety of printing processes, printing out some negatives in more than one medium. In his lectures, he pointed out that this approach to photography was important because in the hands of a photographer who “lives and understands the infinitely varied moods of nature, photography can be made to express and interpret them.” In correspondence with Dr. Olmstead at the Smithsonian, as the presentation of his gifts and bequest to the museum was being arranged, Eickemeyer wrote: “The collection illustrates the use of every important process and will, I believe, be of real educational value.”

The first of the Eickemeyer photographic collection came to the National Museum’s Department of Arts and Industries (the “Castle”), Division of Graphic Arts in 1922 at the close of a large exhibition of Eickemeyer’s work at the Anderson Gallery in New York. It was a gift from the photographer of five framed prints from the New York show that he considered representative of his work.

In 1929, Eickemeyer gave the Smithsonian 83 framed prints (including copies of the prints that he had previously given the museum), 15 portfolios, his medals and awards, and several miscellaneous photographic paraphernalia. In 1930, he made a will bequeathing most of his remaining prints, negatives, photographic equipment and other objects relating to his 30-year career as a photographer to the Smithsonian Institution.

Upon Eickemeyer’s death in 1932, an accession consisting primarily of photographic equipment from his studio came to the Smithsonian. Included in the bequest were 2 cameras, several lenses, scales, timers, printing frames, plate holders, dry mounters and a lecture case with slide projector and hand-colored lantern slides. Also included were 43 albums, journals and portfolios and assorted negatives and contact prints, many marked “discards.” There are 58 albums, notebooks and portfolios in the collection. Eickemeyer requested in his will that his gifts and bequests be called The Rudolf Eickemeyer, Jr. Collection.

young family

National Museum of American History
Rudolf Eickemeyer, Jr. (1862–1932) used a wide variety of printing processes, printing out some negatives in more than one medium. In his lectures, he pointed out that this approach to photography was important because in the hands of a photographer who “lives and understands the infinitely varied moods of nature, photography can be made to express and interpret them.” In correspondence with Dr. Olmstead at the Smithsonian, as the presentation of his gifts and bequest to the museum was being arranged, Eickemeyer wrote: “The collection illustrates the use of every important process and will, I believe, be of real educational value.”

The first of the Eickemeyer photographic collection came to the National Museum’s Department of Arts and Industries (the “Castle”), Division of Graphic Arts in 1922 at the close of a large exhibition of Eickemeyer’s work at the Anderson Gallery in New York. It was a gift from the photographer of five framed prints from the New York show that he considered representative of his work.

In 1929, Eickemeyer gave the Smithsonian 83 framed prints (including copies of the prints that he had previously given the museum), 15 portfolios, his medals and awards, and several miscellaneous photographic paraphernalia. In 1930, he made a will bequeathing most of his remaining prints, negatives, photographic equipment and other objects relating to his 30-year career as a photographer to the Smithsonian Institution.

Upon Eickemeyer’s death in 1932, an accession consisting primarily of photographic equipment from his studio came to the Smithsonian. Included in the bequest were 2 cameras, several lenses, scales, timers, printing frames, plate holders, dry mounters and a lecture case with slide projector and hand-colored lantern slides. Also included were 43 albums, journals and portfolios and assorted negatives and contact prints, many marked “discards.” There are 58 albums, notebooks and portfolios in the collection. Eickemeyer requested in his will that his gifts and bequests be called The Rudolf Eickemeyer, Jr. Collection.

young boy leaning on a barrel

National Museum of American History
Rudolf Eickemeyer, Jr. (1862–1932) used a wide variety of printing processes, printing out some negatives in more than one medium. In his lectures, he pointed out that this approach to photography was important because in the hands of a photographer who “lives and understands the infinitely varied moods of nature, photography can be made to express and interpret them.” In correspondence with Dr. Olmstead at the Smithsonian, as the presentation of his gifts and bequest to the museum was being arranged, Eickemeyer wrote: “The collection illustrates the use of every important process and will, I believe, be of real educational value.”

The first of the Eickemeyer photographic collection came to the National Museum’s Department of Arts and Industries (the “Castle”), Division of Graphic Arts in 1922 at the close of a large exhibition of Eickemeyer’s work at the Anderson Gallery in New York. It was a gift from the photographer of five framed prints from the New York show that he considered representative of his work.

In 1929, Eickemeyer gave the Smithsonian 83 framed prints (including copies of the prints that he had previously given the museum), 15 portfolios, his medals and awards, and several miscellaneous photographic paraphernalia. In 1930, he made a will bequeathing most of his remaining prints, negatives, photographic equipment and other objects relating to his 30-year career as a photographer to the Smithsonian Institution.

Upon Eickemeyer’s death in 1932, an accession consisting primarily of photographic equipment from his studio came to the Smithsonian. Included in the bequest were 2 cameras, several lenses, scales, timers, printing frames, plate holders, dry mounters and a lecture case with slide projector and hand-colored lantern slides. Also included were 43 albums, journals and portfolios and assorted negatives and contact prints, many marked “discards.” There are 58 albums, notebooks and portfolios in the collection. Eickemeyer requested in his will that his gifts and bequests be called The Rudolf Eickemeyer, Jr. Collection.

young boy in a straw hat

National Museum of American History
Rudolf Eickemeyer, Jr. (1862–1932) used a wide variety of printing processes, printing out some negatives in more than one medium. In his lectures, he pointed out that this approach to photography was important because in the hands of a photographer who “lives and understands the infinitely varied moods of nature, photography can be made to express and interpret them.” In correspondence with Dr. Olmstead at the Smithsonian, as the presentation of his gifts and bequest to the museum was being arranged, Eickemeyer wrote: “The collection illustrates the use of every important process and will, I believe, be of real educational value.”

The first of the Eickemeyer photographic collection came to the National Museum’s Department of Arts and Industries (the “Castle”), Division of Graphic Arts in 1922 at the close of a large exhibition of Eickemeyer’s work at the Anderson Gallery in New York. It was a gift from the photographer of five framed prints from the New York show that he considered representative of his work.

In 1929, Eickemeyer gave the Smithsonian 83 framed prints (including copies of the prints that he had previously given the museum), 15 portfolios, his medals and awards, and several miscellaneous photographic paraphernalia. In 1930, he made a will bequeathing most of his remaining prints, negatives, photographic equipment and other objects relating to his 30-year career as a photographer to the Smithsonian Institution.

Upon Eickemeyer’s death in 1932, an accession consisting primarily of photographic equipment from his studio came to the Smithsonian. Included in the bequest were 2 cameras, several lenses, scales, timers, printing frames, plate holders, dry mounters and a lecture case with slide projector and hand-colored lantern slides. Also included were 43 albums, journals and portfolios and assorted negatives and contact prints, many marked “discards.” There are 58 albums, notebooks and portfolios in the collection. Eickemeyer requested in his will that his gifts and bequests be called The Rudolf Eickemeyer, Jr. Collection.
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