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"I'll Be Satisfied" by Paschall Brothers

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Tidewater gospel quartet is a long and proud a cappella tradition, and the Paschall Brothers are among its last tradition-bearers. With a seemingly unbreakable family bond, the Paschall Brothers have followed in the footsteps of their father, Reverend Frank Paschall Sr. (1923–1999), who led them both philosophically and musically by example. Since the 1960s, the Tidewater style of a cappella gospel has all but disappeared. However, with the descendants of Frank Paschall Sr. the tradition continues to fulfill its purpose of bringing the good news to all those who want to hear it. Here the brothers rehearse and discuss their father's legacy at their Newport, Virginian home.

"Imaginaries" by Quetzal from Imaginaries

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Songwriter and lead singer Martha Gonzáles calls Quetzal an “East LA Chican @ rock group,” summing up its roots in the complex cultural currents of barrio life, its social activism, its strong feminist stance, and its rock and roll beginnings. Here, Quetzal performs "Imagineries", the title track from its first Smithsonian Folkways release.

"I’ve Got a Friend in Chicago"

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Students will listen to, analyze, and perform music created by children in the United States and for children by American folk artists.In addition, students will record their own games, songs, and chants.

"Joropo quitapesares" by Cimarrón at 2011 Smithsonian Folklife Festival

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Cimarrón, of the llanos plains region of Colombia, are masters of the joropo llanero genre. Here, these Grammy-nominated musicians perform "Joropo quitapesares" (arr. Carlos Rojas) at the Smithsonian Folklife Festival for the second time since the 2009 Las Amerícas program. The group’s new album ¡Cimarrón! Joropo Music from the Plains of Colombia is available from Smithsonian Folkways

"Jubilee" by the McIntosh County Singers

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Acclaimed upholders of the African American ring shout, the McIntosh County Shouters keep the faith, form, and fervor of the generations-old tradition rooted in their small community of coastal Georgia.

"La Bamba" by José Gutiérrez and Los Hermanos Ochoa from La Bamba: Sones Jarochos from Veracruz

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Son jarocho is the traditional rural music of Veracruz in the Gulf region of Mexico. The son includes coplas or stanzas sung by a "caller" who is accompanied by the hard-driving rhythms of musicians playing unique regional guitars and harp. Jarocho describes the people and culture of southern Veracruz. "La Bamba" is among the best known jarochosongs inside and outside Mexico. The version performed here by José Gutiérrez and Los Hermanos Ochoa showcases a lively harp solo by virtuoso Felipe Ochoa and the rhythmic plucking of the requinto jarocho guitar.

"Let All Religions Come Together" by Akuseka Takuwa from Delicious Peace: Coffee, Music & Interfaith Harmony in Uganda

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Watch a live performance from a group featured on Delicious Peace: Coffee, Music & Interfaith Harmony in Uganda.

"Liberty Funeral March" by the Liberty Brass Band from New Orleans Brass Bands: Through the Streets of the City

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Watch the Liberty Brass Band share their classic New Orleans sound with a performance of their new song "Liberty Funeral March," one of six Liberty Brass Band songs to appear on New Orleans Brass Bands: Through the Streets of the City, alongside recordings by Hot 8 Brass Band and Treme Brass Band.

"Little Bird, Little Bird" by Elizabeth Mitchell from You Are My Little Bird

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
"Little Bird, Little Bird" is from Elizabeth Mitchell's most recent album You Are My Little Bird released in 2006. Elizabeth will release on her fourth children's album, "Sunny Day" in 2010 on Smithsonian Folkways.

"Little Birdie" by Ralph Stanley at 2003 Smithsonian Folklife Festival

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Ralph Stanley, born in Virginia, USA, in 1927, is an influential and celebrated figure in the history of bluegrass music. He created a unique style of banjo playing, sometimes called "Stanley Style," characterized by incredibly fast "forward rolls" (a technique in banjo playing) led by the index finger. Stanley often played with a capo to use the higher registers of the banjo. This 2003 performance by Ralph Stanley and the Clinch Mountain Boys demonstrates the instrumental solos and breakneck speed that characterize bluegrass music.

"Los Vecinos" by Suni Paz from Alerta Sings and Songs for the Playground/ Canciones Para el Recreo

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Suni Paz is an award-winning performer for children and a pioneer in the use of music to teach Spanish-language curricula. Her songs in Spanish encourage children to have pride in their heritage while respecting all cultures. In 2003, Suni was awarded the Magic Penny Award by the Children's Music Network. Here, she discusses the importance of singing to children and the impact it has had on her career. She also performs "Los Vecinos" (The Neighbors), an original composition about the beauty of bilingualism.

"Love Is the Thing to Make it Fall": African-American Music in Alabama before and during the Civil Rights Movement

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
This set of lessons is an introduction to African-American music in Alabama through children’s songs of the 1950s as well as freedom songs of the 1960s. In addition to attentive listening, students will sing, play instruments, improvise, move, and play games.

"M.V. Labadi" by La Drivers Union Por Por Group

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Por por (pronounced paaw paaw) is the name of honking, squeeze-bulb horn music which is unique to the La Drivers Union of Ghana, and which is principally performed at union drivers' funerals. Por por music is played with truck horns, tire pumps, and other everyday objects a truck driver uses. The sound is rooted in Ghanaian tradition and a broad range of musical influences from New Orleans jazz to Highlife. The song performed here honors and praises past drivers. The group then breaks into a jam session. The performance was filmed in Accra, Ghana, during ethnomusicologist Steven Feld's 2006 recording session for Por Por: Honk Horn Music of Ghana.

"Margarita, Margarita" by Max Baca and Flaco Jiménez from Legends and Legacies

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
The music of GRAMMY-winning conjunto artists Max Baca and Flaco Jiménez is steeped in the traditions of their families and region.

"Marina" by Los Texmaniacs from Borders y Bailes

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Los Texmaniacs add creative touches to bring traditional conjunto music to younger audiences. In this acoustic, back porch performance of "Marina," they substitute the guitarrónfor the electric bass.

"Me voy Lejos (I'm Going Far Away)" by Flaco Jiménez & Max Baca from Legends & Legacies

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
The music of GRAMMY-winning conjunto artists Max Baca and Flaco Jiménez is steeped in the traditions of their families and region.

"Mother" by Ulali from Heartbeat:Voices of First Nation's Women

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Ulali is a group of First Nations women who combine drums, rattles, and other percussion instruments with their powerful voices to create a potent blend of traditional Native American roots music and contemporary styles. Pura Fé, Jennifer Kreisberg, and Soni Moreno formed the a capella trio in 1987 and have performed around the world, including work with the Indigo Girls and in the movie Smoke Signals. This performance of "Mother" exhibits the group's range and captivating talent.

"Mujer Borinqueña" by Miguel Santiago Diaz of Ecos de Borinquen

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Traditional Puerto Rican jíbaro music is often improvised, sung poetry. At the core of the traditional song repertoire are the seis (in which the song form is based on six lines) and the aguinaldo (which is based on a decimal, or ten-line stanza). The aguinaldo is well-suited for detailed lyrical narratives of Puerto Rican history and culture and Biblical stories. Here Miquel Santiago-Diaz, founder of Ecos de Borinquen and one-time Puerto Rican national trovador(troubadour, or singer of seis and aguinaldo) demonstrates the aguinaldo style from the town of Orocovis with "Mujer Borinqueña," a song extolling the virtues of a Puerto Rican woman.

"My Better Years" by The Seldom Scene from Long Time…Seldom Scene

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Bluegrass legends The Seldom Scene record the wistful Hazel Dickens' song "My Better Years" for the Smithsonian Folkways album Long Time... Seldom Scene.

"México Lindo" by Natividad "Nati" Cano from ¡Llegaron Los Camperos!: Nati Cano's Mariachi Los Camperos

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Mariachi is an extroverted form of acoustic music that emerged in several western states of Mexico. Ensembles generally employ at least two violins, two trumpets, a five-string rhythm guitar called the vihuela, a large bass guitar called the guitarrón, and a Spanish guitar. Led by Nati Cano, Los Angeles-based Mariachi Los Camperos is one of the most accomplished modern mariachi bands in the world.

"Night Thoughts" by Wu Man at the 2014 Smithsonian Folklife Festival

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
During the 2014 Smithsonian Folklife Festival, Wu Man performed an original composition on the pipa entitled “Night Thoughts,” based on a work by Chinese poet Li Bo. She was accompanied by percussionist Haruka Fujii.

"O Canada" by Asani at 2006 Smithsonian Folklife Festival

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Many cultures, ethnic identities, and languages flourish in Canada. French, English, Scottish, and Irish immigrants have maintained their cultural heritage across generations, as have Aboriginal peoples fiercely determined to preserve their ways of life in the wake of oppressive colonialism and its injustices. Recent American, Eastern and Northern European, and Asian immigrants also contribute to the cultural mosaic. "O, Canada," the Canadian national anthem, was originally written in French in 1880, and the English version was chosen as the country's official anthem in 1980. Here Asani, an Aboriginal women's a cappella group from Edmonton, Alberta, present a stirring rendition of "O, Canada," re-imagined to reflect the myriad peoples who call Canada their homeland.

"Oh, John the Rabbit" by Elizabeth Mitchell from Sunny Day

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Music video of "Oh, John the Rabbit" by Elizabeth Mitchell and You Are My Flower.

"Orphan Child" by The National Cherokee Youth Choir at 2004 Smithsonian Folklife Festival

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
"Orphan Child" is a song of unknown origins but is believed to have been created on the Trail of Tears in the 1830s, when the Cherokee people were forcibly removed to the American West. The song has come to represent a source of comfort to the Cherokee. The National Cherokee Youth Choir, formed in 2000, is based in Tahlequah, Oklahoma and is composed of around 40 youth in grade five to eight from across the Cherokee Nation.
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