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Found 2,010 Collections

 

Distance Learning: Teaching Persepolis

The purpose of this collection is to model for educators distance learning instruction:

  1. using museum artifacts & visual texts to learn/ teach
    • historical/ cultural context for novel study
  2. using Project Zero thinking routines to interrogate text
Sher Anderson Petty
32
 

Easy PZ: Unveiling Stories & Building Culturally Responsive Teaching Practice

Each Easy PZ collection includes an artwork or museum object and a recorded webinar demonstrating how to use it to develop students' skills with a Harvard Project Zero thinking routine. Supplementary resources provide context relevant to understanding the featured artwork or object.

This collection models the routine "Unveiling Stories" with a museum resource from the National Museum of African American History and Culture as a method to help teachers develop their practice of culturally responsive teaching.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
26
 

Easy PZ: Unveiling Stories & Culturally Responsive Teaching with Students

Each Easy PZ collection includes an artwork or museum object and a recorded webinar demonstrating how to use it to develop students' skills with a Harvard Project Zero thinking routine. Supplementary resources provide context relevant to understanding the featured artwork or object.

This collection models the routine "Unveiling Stories" with a museum resource from the National Museum of African Art to support culturally responsive teaching.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
15
 

Air and Space Symbols

This collection explores our nation's symbols and how mission and squadron patches incorporate symbolism in their design.  Students are then encouraged to create their own patch.

Grade 1 Social Studies: Civic Values 1.2

Students identify and describe the symbols, icons, songs, and traditions of the United States that exemplify cherished ideals and provide continuity and a sense of community across time. 

Keywords: #airandspace, National Air and Space Museum, NASM, patch, logo, symbol, Tuskegee airmen, 

National Air and Space Museum Smithsonian
21
 

World War II - Victory in Europe

Learn about WWII from Tuskegee Airman, Charles McGee and explore how you can help tell the stories of local veterans with the help of student reporter Jaden Jefferson.

National Air and Space Museum
24
 

World War One: How the Great War Still Influences Today | STEM in 30

The Great War ended 100 years ago this November. Have you ever wondered what it was like to fly in a WWI aircraft, or what it was like to live back then? Find out the answers to those questions, and the wars impact on today on this episode of STEM in 30.

National Air and Space Museum
18
 

WWI: How History Shaped Technology

98 years ago this week, the United States entered World War I. The Wright brothers had only taken to the sky 14 years before, but airplanes still played a vital role in the war effort. Because of the events of WWI, airplane technology developed at an incredible rate. This fast-paced webcast will look at how airplanes changed in this short timeframe, how other technology advanced, and how airplanes were used throughout WWI.

April 8, 2015

National Air and Space Museum
18
 

Milestones of Flight: The Lindberghs

Charles Lindbergh is probably best known for making the first solo flight across the Atlantic in the Spirit of St. Louis. However, Lindbergh and his wife, Anne Morrow Lindbergh, also reached other milestones in aviation. In 1929 they purchased a Lockheed Sirius airplane and flew it to Asia, proving the viability of traveling from the West to the Far East via the Great Circle route to the north. During a trip through Greenland, a native boy gave the Sirius its nickname: Tingmissartoq, meaning "one who flies like a big bird." This episode of STEM in 30 will explore the Lindberghs' aviation-related accomplishments.

January 27, 2016

National Air and Space Museum
12
 

WWII and Tuskegee Airmen

Before 1941, there weren't any African American pilots in the United States armed forces. The Tuskegee Airmen changed that. With the United States' entry into World War II imminent, the U.S. Army Air Corps (the predecessor to the U.S. Air Force) decided to offer training to African Americans as pilots and mechanics. Called the Tuskegee Airmen because they trained in Tuskegee, Alabama, these airmen made a pioneering contribution to the war and the subsequent drive to end racial segregation in the American military. This episode of STEM in 30 will look at the role African Americans played during the war and how World War II changed aviation history

February 24, 2016

National Air and Space Museum
14
 

World War I: Legacy, Letters, and Belgian War Lace

In this STEAM (science, technology, engineering, art, math) inspired STEM in 30, we will look at some of the technological advances of World War I that solidified the airplane's legacy as a fighting machine. In conjunction with the Embassy of Belgium, we'll also dive deep into how the war affected the lives of children in an occupied country and how lace makers helped feed a nation. The episode will also look at present works of art by artist soldiers on display in the Artist Soldiers: Artistic Expression in the First World War exhibition.

April 26, 2017

National Air and Space Museum
24
 

Memorial Day Celebration: Women in the Military

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring women in the military. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they used to think and what they think now that they learned more. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about World War II as well as explore WASPs. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

Ellen Rogers
29
 

Dolores Huerta: Revolution in the Fields/Revolución en los Campos

Dolores Huerta: Revolution in the Fields/Revolución en los Campos shares the compelling story of legendary activist and leader Dolores Huerta (b. 1930) and the farm workers movement of the 1960s and 70s. It is a quintessentially American tale of struggle and sacrifice, of courage and victory.

As a complement to the exhibition, these educational resources explore Huerta's public life as an activist and co-founder of the United Farm Workers  (UFW) and what led her to become a Latina civil rights icon. In her life as a communicator, organizer, lobbyist, contract negotiator, teacher and mother,  Huerta's unparalleled leadership skills helped dramatically improve the lives of farm workers.

Users will broaden their understanding of the farm workers movement through a careful look at Dolores Huerta's significant - but often under-acknowledged - contributions. The exhibition and educational resources also explore how workers of different ethnic and racial backgrounds came together to empower the movement and how the arts played an essential role. In addition, users will come to understand Huerta's far-reaching impact and important legacy.

The resources in this collection include a bilingual community engagement resource to promote dialogue on issues that relate to social justice, activism, leadership, etc. A few activities that can be used in the classroom or when you visit the exhibition at your local museum.  In addition, you can learn more by listening to Dolores Huerta by downloading the free downloadable App "Dolores Huerta" on Google and Apple.  Please remember that the App takes a few minutes to download.


#NHD #NHD2020  #BecauseOfHerStory


Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service
57
 

Art To Go/ Arte en su casa (Elementary)

Artworks and Activities for Elementary Students Learning at Home. This packet includes a booklet of creative writing activities and printed artworks that feature heroic figures and folktales.

Obras de arte y actividades para estudiantes de la escuela primaria que aprenden en casa. Este conjunto de actividades incluye un folleto con ejercicios de redacción creativa y obras de arte impresas que presentan a personajes heroicos y cuentos populares.

Elizabeth Dale-Deines
8
 

Read Between the Brushstrokes: Using Visual Art as a Historical Source ("New Age of Slavery")

This Learning Lab from the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) will explore the connection between visual art and history. 

When studying history, it is important to remember that all historical sources do not look the same. Visual art, being an active response to a stimulus, serves as a mirror to the contemporary landscape. Art engages in a conversation with history while acting as a visual expression of contemporary thoughts and ideas.

Through the visual art piece "New Age of Slavery" by Patrick Campbell (2014), students will learn more about the events and cultural context of the contemporary landscape including the pattern of police brutality against African Americans and the Black Lives Matter Movement while honing their visual literacy competency. The questions, prompts, and information provided in this Learning Lab will help students hone their skills in visual literacy competency. Students can use this Learning Lab collection to help sharpen their historical thinking skills and expand their conceptions of historical sources.

The guiding questions of this Learning Lab are

  • What is visual art’s connection to historical events? Why is it important that we recognize these connections?
  • How do contemporary events shape artists’ responses in their art making?
  • What does studying art add to our understanding of historical events and time periods?

The goals of this Learning Lab are

  • Bridge the gap in understanding between art analysis and historical analysis
  • Explore the inherent ties between art pieces and their surrounding historical context
  • Introduce the foundations of formal art analysis and develop close looking skills for visual art pieces

If you are new to Learning Lab, visit https://learninglab.si.edu/help/getting-started to learn how to get started!

Keywords: NMAAHC, African American, slavery, flag, American, 13th Amendment, visual art, Black Lives Matter, lynching, United States, visual literacy

National Museum of African American History and Culture
12
 

Read Between the Brushstrokes: Using Visual Art as a Historical Source ("Off to War")

This Learning Lab from the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) will explore the connection between visual art and history. 

When studying history, it is important to remember that all historical sources do not look the same. Visual art, being an active response to a stimulus, serves as a mirror to the contemporary landscape. Art engages in a conversation with history while acting as a visual expression of contemporary thoughts and ideas.

Through the visual art piece Off to War by William H. Johnson (1942-1944), students will learn more about the events and cultural context of the 1940s in America. Johnson’s piece responds to the tumultuous political and social climate of the period with a consciously naïve depiction of an African American family sending their son off to war. His painting sheds light on the deeply personal impact of World War II on domestic America, especially the African American community. Students can use this Learning Lab collection to help sharpen their historical thinking skills, hone their visual literacy competency, and expand their conceptions of historical sources. The questions, prompts, and information provided in this Learning Lab will help students hone their skills in visual literacy competency.

The guiding questions of this Learning Lab are

  • What is visual art’s connection to historical events? Why is it important that we recognize these connections?
  • How do contemporary events shape artists’ responses in their art making?
  • What does studying art add to our understanding of historical events and time periods?

The goals of this Learning Lab are

  • Bridge the gap in understanding between art analysis and historical analysis
  • Explore the inherent ties between art pieces and their surrounding historical context
  • Introduce the foundations of formal art analysis and develop close looking skills for visual art pieces

If you are new to Learning Lab, visit https://learninglab.si.edu/help/getting-started to learn how to get started!

National Museum of African American History and Culture
12
 

James Smithson: What's in a Name?

Do you know how the Smithsonian got its name?  If you answered "no" you are not alone.  A lot of people know about the Smithsonian Institution, but they don't know about the man who gave his name and bequest to create what has become the largest museum complex and research center in the world.

Curious?  Well, here's the story...

Laura Shafer
11
 

Memorial Day Celebration: Native American Veterans

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring Native American Veterans. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they used to think and what they think now that they learned more. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about World War II as well as explore code talkers during wars. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

Ellen Rogers
19
 

Viral Histories: Asian Americans and the Food Service Industry

How do we maintain strength and community after an emergency is over? 

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Asian Americans have been experiencing increased racism and hate crimes. While these incidents of increased prejudice and violence occur today, they reflect a long history of how power, prejudice, and public health have intersected throughout American history. For Asian Pacific American History Month, Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History held conversations in a series called Viral Histories: Stories of Racism, Resilience, and Resistance in Asian American Communities, with community leaders combating racism while serving on the front lines. Community leaders shared their first-hand experience with historians who connect these experiences to the past.  

In this topical collection, co-hosts Theodore S. Gonzalves, Smithsonian National Museum of American History Curator of Asian Pacific American History, and Lintaro Donovan, High School Student and Civic Leader, interview Genevieve Villamora, co-owner of the Washington, DC-based restaurant Bad Saint, about the impacts of COVID-19 on the food service industry. 

This topical collection aims to contextualize what we learn from Genevieve Villamora's interview by providing additional information about the history of Asian Americans in the American food service industry and stories about Asian American foodways. As you explore the resources in this collection, and reflect on Genevieve Villamora's interview, we ask you to consider this question for self-reflection or discussion: How do we maintain strength and community after an emergency is over? 

#ViralHistories 

 

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
19
 

Subject: Photo Albums

#nmahphc

This is a sampling of photographic albums from the Photographic History Collection.

Please note, viewing these albums may require patience on the part of the viewer. Most of these albums have pages visible to the public. The pages may be included in photographs attached to the "More Info" record. If pages are not individually visible through the record, go to collections.si.edu and search for the catalog number found on the "More Info" record; the pages of the album can be seen in a pdf slide show.

The Photographic History Collection contains many albums with and without images. For additional photographic objects, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: photo album, photography album, album pages, gem tintypes, carte-de-visite, cartes-de-visite, cabinet card, cigarette cards, studio photography, studio portraiture, snapshots, travel photography, celebrity photography, collectible photography, vernacular photography, portrait photography, Civil War, WWI, photography, family record keeping, Disneyland, Disneyworld, tourist destinations, yearbooks, college years, cyanotypes, circus, scrapbook, wallpaper sample book, composition notebook, actors, actresses, stage performers, soldiers, photographers

(The objects included in this Learning Lab collection are all intact albums. Not included are individual album pages or photographic images that were previously included in albums or books.)


NMAH Photographic History Collection
29
 

Timeline through History

History has been a lesson for all of us. We see that history very closely correlates with the Biblical timeline of events. We'll try to trace some of those events in this collection.

Angelin Abraham
30
 

Viral Histories: Asian American Resistance and Resilience

What is our responsibility to examine the assumptions we have about others? 

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Asian Americans have been experiencing increased racism and hate crimes. While these incidents of increased prejudice and violence occur today, they reflect a long history of how power, prejudice, and public health have intersected throughout American history. For Asian Pacific American History Month, Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History held conversations in a series called Viral Histories: Stories of Racism, Resilience, and Resistance in Asian American Communities, with community leaders combating racism while serving on the front lines. Community leaders shared their first-hand experience with historians who connect these experiences to the past.  

In this topical collection, co-hosts Theodore S. Gonzalves, Smithsonian National Museum of American History Curator of Asian Pacific American History, and Lintaro Donovan, High School Student and Civic Leader, interview Russell Jeung, Professor of Asian American Studies at San Francisco State University and creator of "Stop AAPI Hate," about the impacts of COVID-19 and the rise of anti-Asian racism. 

This topical collection aims to contextualize what we learn from Prof. Jeung's interview by providing additional information about the Chinese Exclusion Act, the Yellow Peril rhetoric from the 19th century, as well as moments of community resilience and resistance. As you explore the resources in the collection, we ask you to consider this question for self-reflection or discussion: What is our responsibility to examine the assumptions we have about others? 

#ViralHistories

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
17
 

Viral Histories: Community Organizing in America's Chinatowns

What drives us to build community strength and resiliency during an emergency? 

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Asian Americans have been experiencing increased racism and hate crimes. While these incidents of increased prejudice and violence occur today, they reflect a long history of how power, prejudice, and public health have intersected throughout American history. For Asian Pacific American History Month, Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History held conversations in a series called Viral Histories: Stories of Racism, Resilience, and Resistance in Asian American Communities, with community leaders combating racism while serving on the front lines. Community leaders shared their first-hand experience with historians who connect these experiences to the past.  

In this topical collection, co-hosts Theodore S. Gonzalves, Smithsonian National Museum of American History Curator of Asian Pacific American History, and Lintaro Donovan, High School Student and Civic Leader, interview Max Leung, creator of the San Francisco Peace Collective, a volunteer civilian patrol group in San Francisco's Chinatown. Max discusses the impacts of COVID-19 on San Francisco's Chinatown community and how we can organize for our neighbors in the middle of a pandemic. 

This topical collection aims to contextualize what we learn from Max's interview by providing additional information about how Asian American communities have organized in the past and the present during COVID-19. As you explore the resources in this collection and reflect on Max's interview, we ask you to consider this question for self-reflection and discussion: What drives us to build community strength and resiliency during an emergency? 

#ViralHistories

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
20
 

Viral Histories: Filipino American Nurses and Healthcare Workers

What do we take for granted? How does this inform the choices we make?

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Asian Americans have been experiencing increased racism and hate crimes. While these incidents of increased prejudice and violence occur today, they reflect a long history of how power, prejudice, and public health have intersected throughout American history. For Asian Pacific American History Month, Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History held conversations in a series called Viral Histories: Stories of Racism, Resilience, and Resistance in Asian American Communitieswith community leaders combating racism while serving on the front lines. Community leaders shared their first-hand experience with historians who connect these experiences to the past.  

In this topical collection, Viral Histories co-hosts Theodore S. Gonzalves, Smithsonian National Museum of American History Curator of Asian Pacific American History, and Lintaro Donovan, High School Student and Civic Leader, interview Abigaile De Mesa, a supervising nurse from New Jersey about the impacts of COVID-19 on healthcare workers. 

This topical collection aims to contextualize what we learn from Abigaile De Mesa's interview by providing additional information about the US Philippine War, the migration of Filipino nurses to the United States, and how COVID-19 is impacting nurses today. As you explore the resources in this collection, and reflect on Abigaile's interview, we ask you to consider this question for self-reflection or discussion: What do we take for granted? How does this inform the choices we make? 

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
19
 

History Lab: Time Capsules

In this History Lab, we will think about how many objects can work together to tell a story. How does a time capsule help us to learn about the past? What would you put in your own time capsule?

To talk with us and learn about more time capsules, join us for the History Lab Debrief! Visit https://www.heinzhistorycenter... and look for the History Lab section to find the registration link. We hope you can join us!

HeinzHistoryCenterEducation
25
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