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Found 478 Collections

 

May the Road Rise Up to Meet You: St. Patty's Day Fun

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring St. Patrick's Day. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about St. Patrick's Day, read articles about magic folk, and listen to the read aloud Rainbow Fish. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
39
 

Cloudy With a Chance of Fun

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring clouds. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about clouds, read articles about clouds, and listen to a read aloud called Brave Irene who faces some very interesting weather. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
22
 

Rocks and Minerals Cornerstone Field Trip

#TUTeach

Grade 4: Rocks and Minerals

Program Description: Students will become real life geologists and museum curators! The Cornerstone experience begins at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History with an interactive, hands-on learning experience in Q?rius jr.: a discovery room. While at the museum, students will learn what it means to be a geologist, and closely examine a chosen rock or mineral. Finally, students will have the opportunity to explore the Janet Annenberg Hooker Hall of Geology, Gems, & Minerals. Transferring their learning back to the classroom, these fourth grade geologists will create their very own rock/mineral museum display.

Anita Cauchi
17
 

#TUTeach

Grade 4: Rocks and Minerals

Program Description: Students will become real life geologists and museum curators! The Cornerstone experience begins at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History with an interactive, hands-on learning experience in Q?rius jr.: a discovery room. While at the museum, students will learn what it means to be a geologist, and closely examine a chosen rock or mineral. Finally, students will have the opportunity to explore the Janet Annenberg Hooker Hall of Geology, Gems, & Minerals. Transferring their learning back to the classroom, these fourth grade geologists will create their very own rock/mineral museum display.

Elsy Rivera
17
 

Dihydrogen monoxide

This collection features water. #tuteach

Kristina Lowe
12
 

Rocks & Minerals

Grade: 4th 

This resource includes images of different minerals and rocks. Within this resource you will also find a student friendly video of a geologist explaining the three different kinds of rock that cover our Earth's surface! Lastly, students will be able to explore the Janet Annenberg Hooker Hall of Geology, Gems, & Minerals and complete the attached worksheets. Transferring their learning back to the classroom, these fourth grade geologists will create their very own rock/mineral museum display. #TUTeach

Darinka Acevedo
15
 

AIR & SPACE: Can it Fly?

Talk with Me!

Having conversations with young children contributes to their thinking and language development. All conversations are good, but research shows that the quality of words children hear matters more than the quantity. Further, what’s best is an exchange; in other words, talk with children, not at them.

The Talk with Me Toolkits give parents and caregivers thematically organized high-quality, authentic materials to make children their conversational partners in discussions that matter. Each online toolkit features captivating videos and real-world photographs, as well as intriguing paintings and other artworks to observe and discuss through conversation prompts.  Hands-on activities and books complete each toolkit. Simple instructions appear right in the toolkits, so you can jump right in. See what interests your child and get started. There’s a lot to talk about!

To read more, see, from the Harvard Graduate School of Education’s Usable Knowledge site, The Brain-Changing Power of Conversation.


#TUTeach

Allie Lamb
13
 

Life in the Snow World

Humans have many ways of coping with winter conditions: we can wear layers, warm ourselves by the fire, stay indoors, and even travel to warmer climates. Do animals and plants have ways of coping with winter conditions too? Indeed, many organisms that live in snowy regions have adapted over time to snowy conditions. Native animals and plants have special adaptations or behavior to help them survive life in the snow world. Photos and questions in this collection will help students to explore these unique adaptations. Simply click the paperclip in each image to see the prompts pertaining to each photo. This collection is ideal for an exploratory lesson.

Lake Tahoe Interpretation
14
 

guns and stuff used in the American revolution

a collection of guns

David Marchant
10
 

Earth Optimism Teen Conversations

The Earth Day Network describes the first Earth Day as a momentous event: On April 22, 1970, 20 million Americans — at the time, 10% of the total population of the United States — took to the streets, parks, and auditoriums to demonstrate for a healthy and sustainable environment in massive coast-to-coast rallies. Thousands of colleges and universities organized protests against the deterioration of the environment. https://www.earthday.org/history/.

In 2020, at the 50th anniversary of the first Earth Day, many argue that there is still much work to be done. This collection of objects and resources challenges teens nationwide to ask and discuss the questions: What will the legacy of Earth Day and the conversation movement be 50 years from now?  How will we get there?

Included in this collection are themes, prompts, and resources to help guide your conversations. Discussion prompts are included within each section title square.

National Museum of American History
80
 

Humans and the Footprints We Leave: Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship 2020 Opening Panel Resources

This collection serves as an introduction to the opening panel of the 2020 Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program. This year's theme is “Humans and the Footprints We Leave: Climate Change and Other Critical Challenges." Three Smithsonian staff members will present at the session, including Igor Krupnik (Curator of Arctic and Northern Ethnology collections and Head of the Ethnology Division at the National Museum of Natural History), Alison Cawood (Citizen Science Coordinator at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center), and Ashley Peery (Educator for the exhibition "Outbreak: Epidemics in a Connected World, " at the National Museum of Natural History). Their bios, presentation descriptions, and other resources are included inside.

As you explore these resources, be sure to jot down any questions you have for the presenters. It is sure to be a fascinating and fruitful seminar series!

#MCteach

Philippa Rappoport
16
 

New Student Copy of Forgotten Elephants of Deep Time with Paleobiologist Advait Jukar

Program Details

  • December 12, 2019
  • Shows are ~45 minutes long and stream at 11am and 2pm ET
  • The program is free, but registration is requested.  

Overview

The earliest elephant relatives originated in Africa about 60 million years ago and dispersed to every continent on earth, except Antarctica and Australia. There are about 165  known elephant species from the fossil record, and scientists estimate that there would have been many more that we haven't found yet, over the whole history of this special group, called a clade. In Earth’s more recent history, between 50,000 and 40,000 years ago, there were 16 species of elephants and their relatives living at the same time around the world, including at least 7 in the United States. Today, there are only three species of elephants that remain: the African savannah elephant (Loxodonta africana), the African forest elephant (Loxodonta cyclotis), and the Asian elephant (Elephas maximus). Populations of all three species are declining, with Asian elephants at a much higher risk of extinction.

Today’s elephants are part of the order Proboscidea which consists of modern elephants and their extinct relatives such as mastodons, mammoths, and gomphotheres. All of the animals in this group have a proboscis, or trunk, that they use to eat and drink. While today there are only two surviving elephant genera, the African and Asian elephant, their evolutionary history is much more diverse.

Paleontologists use fossil elephant teeth to understand the animal’s diet and feeding behavior. There are two main types of teeth: high crowned and low-crowned teeth.

  • High-Crowned Teeth: Animals that consume tougher, more abrasive foods are likely to wear down their teeth over time, and thus have evolved to have higher-crowned teeth as a result. These animals typically have an herbivorous grazing diet; they graze grasses.
  • Low-Crowned Teeth: Animals that eat softer food have less wear, and therefore have low-crowned teeth. These animals typically have an herbivorous browsing diet; they browse branches, eating soft leaves.

Darlene Smith
3
 

Student Version of Prehistoric Climate Change and Why It Matters Today

In a lesson in this issue of Smithsonian in Your Classroom, students do the work of a team of paleontologists studying a time of rising carbon dioxide and rapid global warming during the Eocene epoch. By examining fossils of tree leaves, and then incorporating the findings into a mathematical formula, they are able to tell average annual temperatures 55 million years ago. Really!

Click the PDF icons to download the issue and additional materials.

Darlene Smith
7
 

Animal Adaptations

Generative Topic: Animal Adaptations

Essential Questions:  

How do organisms live, grow, respond to their environment and reproduce?  

How and why do organisms interact with their environment and what are the effects of these interactions?  

How can there be so many similarities among organisms yet so many different kinds of plants, animals, and microorganisms?  

What are the roles of organisms in a food chain?   

How do the structures and functions of living things allow them to meet their needs?

What are characteristics that allow populations of animals to survive in an environment?

How does the variation among individuals affect their survival?

Understanding Moves: Describe What's There, Uncovering Complexity, Reason with Evidence

Thinking Moves: See Think Wonder, Parts Purposes Complexities

Lesson Focus:  

Students will investigate that animals have both internal and external structures that serve various functions in growth, survival, behavior, and reproduction and will engage in engineering and design.  Students build a model and use their understanding of how animals are adapted to survive in a particular environment.

Prior Learnings/Connection:

Students have prior knowledge about ecosystems, animal classifications, basic adaptations such as means of obtaining diet, protection, and movement.

Understandings:

Organisms interact in feeding relationships in ecosystems.

Organisms may compete for resources in an ecosystem.

For any particular environment, some kinds of organisms survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all.

Populations live in a variety of habitats, and change in those habitats affects the organisms living there.

Other characteristics result from individuals’ interactions with the environment. Many characteristics involve both inheritance and environment.

Many characteristics of organisms are inherited from their parents.

When the environment changes in ways that affect a place’s physical characteristics, temperature, or availability of resources, some organisms survive and reproduce, others move to new locations, yet others move into the transformed environment, and some die.

Populations live in a variety of habitats, and change in those habitats affects the organisms living there.

Aquisition of Knowledge and Skill

Knowledge:

Producers (plants, algae, phytoplankton) make their own food, which is also used by animals (consumers).

Decomposers eat dead plant and animal materials and recycle the nutrients in the system.

Adaptations are structures and behaviors of an organism that help it survive and reproduce. 

Organisms are related in feeding relationships called food chains. Animals eat plants, and other animals eat those animals.

Skills:

Make observations to produce data to serve as the basis for evidence for an explanation of a phenomenon or test a design solution.

Use evidence (e.g. measurements, observations, patterns) to construct an explanation.

Identify the cause and effect relationships that are routinely identified and used to explain change.

Observe and identify structures and behaviors that help an animal survive in its environment.

Present results of their investigations in an organized manner.

Make a claim and supporting it with evidence.

Synthesize information from more than one source.

Assessment Evidence:

Performance Task: 

This collaborative project gives students the opportunity to take part in the systematic practice of engineering and design to achieve solutions to problems. During a life science unit, fourth grade students learn that for any particular environment, some kinds of organisms survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all.  Students then apply these core scientific ideas to demonstrate understanding as they design, test, and refine an animal that is well suited to survive in its environment. By integrating content with practice, students are better able to make sense of science.

Presentation:

Students will create a  presentation in which they showcase their Animal design and explain how it is well adapted to survive in its environment.

Learning Activities:

During See Think Wonder students engage in observation of  animals as the foundation for greater insight into structure and function.  Students first look closely at an animal to fully observe and notice before interpreting.  Then students can begin to make interpretations based on their observations.  Students use Smithsonian Collection resources, such as videos, 3D models with pins/annotations, articles to further explore blue crab structures and behaviors and how they help the animal survive in its environment.   Students then use Parts Purposes Complexities routine to develop understanding of the concept of adaptation - a structure or behavior that improves an organism's chance of survival.  Students study the blue crab environment and as they consider how people changing the crabs' environment have affected the blue crab population.  To assess understanding, students complete the Animal Adaptations design challenge.

#PZPGH

Darlene Smith
15
 

HIV/AIDS Art

Anna Rabin
14
 

Visionary Concept Tire, 2016-2019

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
5
 

Ultraboost Shoe, 2016-Ongoing

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
9
 

Alexandra Daisy Ginsberg's The Substitute

On March 19, 2018, the last male northern white rhino, Sudan, died, bringing his subspecies to the brink of extinction. As scientists work to resurrect the rhino through experimental and controversial biotechnologies, Alexandra Daisy Ginsberg “brings back to life” a male northern white rhino using data generated by artificial intelligence to ask the question “what errors in reproduction may arise as we recreate life artificially?” As it habituates to its environment, the rhino’s form and sound toggle from pixelated to lifelike—reminding us that this rhino, coming to life without its natural context, is entirely artificial.

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
10
 

Movement

This collection uses Eric Carle's book From Head to Toe to explore how animals and people move. To talk about the book with your child, first read From Head to Toe together (or watch the video in the first box). Next, let your child look at the other animals on the webpage and decide what he/she wants to explore. Encourage conversation and exploration!

This collection was created by Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center faculty member. #SEECStories

Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center
27
 

Looking at the Moon

Talk with Me!

Having conversations with young children contributes to their thinking and language development. All conversations are good, but research shows that the quality of words children hear matters more than the quantity. Further, what’s best is an exchange; in other words, talk with children, not at them.

The Talk with Me Toolkits give parents and caregivers thematically organized high-quality, authentic materials to make children their conversational partners in discussions that matter. Each online toolkit features captivating videos and real-world photographs, as well as intriguing paintings and other artworks to observe and discuss through conversation prompts.  Hands-on activities and books complete each toolkit. Simple instructions appear right in the toolkits, so you can jump right in. See what interests your child and get started. There’s a lot to talk about!

To read more, see, from the Harvard Graduate School of Education’s Usable Knowledge site, The Brain-Changing Power of Conversation.


Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center
19
 

STEAM: Cross-curricular Connections for Young Learners

Artwork, museums, and the community are powerful resources that bring concepts to life with young children. This collection provides examples of how to utilize museums and the community to explore STEM concepts through artwork. 

This collection was created by a Smithsonian Early Enrichment faculty member to support a webinar with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, presented in October  24, 2018.  


Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center
81
 

How Birds Stay Warm with Ornithologist Sahas Barve

How do birds stay warm, especially in some of the coldest places on Earth, like the Himalayas? Explore the science behind how bird feathers help them conserve body heat with Smithsonian ornithologist (bird nerd) Sahas Barve from the National Museum of Natural History. Sahas will explain the different parts of a feather, and the science behind feathers, and also help students identify patterns in feathers. He will show students how to make predictions, based solely on feathers, on the kind of climate a bird lived in. Students will also learn how birds use metabolic processes to essentially “shiver” to generate body heat when feathers aren’t enough. Sahas studies how birds stay warm across Earth’s highest mountain range, the Himalayas, and will use specimens and examples from his research throughout the program.

Maggy Benson
13
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