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Found 419 Collections

 

Our Story (Carver Museum, Cultural and Genealogy Center History)

Our history begins in the modest building that housed Austin’s first library. Built in 1926, this small, wood-framed structure was soon overwhelmed by the demands of its patrons. During this time, the citizens of East Austin, along with the American Association of University Women, began to petition the city about the need for a library in their community. As a result, when a larger central library facility was built in 1933, the original building was moved to its current location on Angelina Street and later resurfaced in brick veneer.

In its early years, the Angelina Street library was simply known as the “Colored Branch”. In 1947, however, it was christened the George Washington Carver Branch Library in honor of the inventor and scientist who brought so much pride to African-Americans. For decades, the Carver Library served the Central-East Austin community, and its patronage and book collection grew steadily.

As patrons increased and space became limited, the need for a larger Carver Branch Library became apparent. Through the efforts of the Central-East Austin Citizens for a New Carver Branch, this issue continued to have a voice. In 1979 a new facility was completed directly adjacent to the original Carver Library.

 

As for the original building – the community imagined a museum and community center that would promote African-American history and achievement in Austin, Travis County, and beyond. On October 24, 1980, their vision became a reality. What was once Austin’s first library, and then later became Austin’s first branch library, opened its doors as the George Washington Carver Museum and Cultural Center, the first African-American neighborhood museum in of Texas.

In a 1998 bond election, the citizens of Austin voted to further expand both the Carver Museum & Cultural Center and the Carver Branch Library. Today, the museum is housed in a 36,000 square-foot facility that includes four galleries, a conference room, classroom, darkroom, dance studio, 134-seat theatre, and archival space. The galleries feature a core exhibit on Juneteenth, a permanent exhibit on Austin African-American families, an Artists’ Gallery, and a children’s exhibit on African-American scientists and inventors.

The historic building now houses the genealogy center. The museum, cultural and genealogy center is owned and operated by the City of Austin Parks and Recreation Department, Division of Museums and Cultural Programs.

#ethnicstudies #africanamericanhistory #georgewashingtoncarver #austintxhistory

carvermuseumatx
4
 

Aliens and How Close We've Come

A collection that focuses on what information has been collected on aliens, our contact with them directly or indirectly, how far we've come in our theories about them, how close we are to them, or if they even exist.

Caigea Milfort
27
 

Mars

Let's learn about the red planet, Mars!

Jillian Johnston Zillig
1
 

FINAL PROJECT HIST

Unique Cole
16
 

Ingenuity Challenge 2019

RebeccaBeakerhead
13
 

Snowboarding; Evolution of Sport, Products, and Culture

Investigating the evolution of Snowboarding as a transformative force in snow sport culture and professional athletics, a driver of product engineering and design, and a powerful voice for environmental stewardship that resonates with our youth.

Navigation North
13
 

Geodes

6th grade Art class studied geodes, broke them open and then did an art piece.

Angela Randall
6
 

Breaking Barriers: Innovation and Industry

This collection brings together EDSITEment and Smithsonian resources to support the initial research into a project for National History Day 2020, "Breaking Barriers in History."

These resources—including, objects, photographs, portraits, lesson plans, and articles—explore how technologies developed in the interest of advancing industrialization during the United States’ Second Industrial Revolution made it possible to overcome economic and social barriers, while, in some cases, unintentionally creating new ones. Innovators who developed technologies and tools to make every day living easier and more enjoyable, along with transportation technologies that broke barriers in terms of travel and movement, are also included in this collection. Users are also asked to consider the legacies of these inventions and their significance to innovation and industrialization through to today. The second resource of this collection contains questions to help with the analysis of a chosen topic alongside photograph, document, artwork, portrait, and object resources. 

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.

This collection was created in collaboration with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

Share your National History Day collections and let us know what you think! Write to us on Twitter: @EDSITEment and @SmithsonianLab, #NHD2020. If you publish a collection on your National History Day topic, be sure to enter #NHD2020 in the description!

Tags: factory, industry, invention, innovator, Thomas Edison, Nikola Tesla, Alexander Graham Bell, Samuel F. B. Morse, telegraph, Christopher Latham Sholes, typewriter, telephone, communication, technology, workers, labor, International Ladies Garment Workers Union, David Dubinsky, Asa Philip Randolph, John Llewellyn Lewis, Frances Perkins, Samuel Gompers, strike, boycott, union, Transcontinental, railroad, nineteenth century, 19th, twentieth, 20th, #NHD

EDSITEment
98
 

Prototyping

#designthinking

Taryn Grigas
16
 

AFRICAN COSMOS

Put the ARTS in STEM - From Egypt to South Africa, take a brief tour of the African Cosmos  and have your students discover the intersection of Art and Astronomy in the southern hemisphere.   Explore constellations only seen on the African continent.  See why the Goliath beetle became a symbol of rebirth for the Egyptian scarab.  Learn about celestial navigation by people and animals. 

Create Your Own Constellation!  



Deborah Stokes
73
 

Getting Started with Design Thinking

This collection allows students and teachers to gain an understanding of the Design Thinking process utilizing Cooper Hewitt learning lab resources as well other materials. 

#designthinking

Mary Marotta
48
 

Prototyping

#designthinking

Mary Marotta
16
 

Apollo 13

Collection created to supplement the Red Clover Award book Counting on Katherine: How Katherine Johnson Saved Apollo 13.
Carrie Speranza
13
 

Smithsonian Science How: Exploring the Coral Reefs of Belize

Teachers: Use this collection of resources to prepare for the Oct. 8, 2019 Smithsonian Science How webcast programs, Tracking the Health of Coral Reefs: Live from Belize. The webcast programs will be broadcast live at 2pm and 3:30pm ET. To sign up and get more information, visit: https://naturalhistory.si.edu/education/distance-learning/tracking-health-coral-reefs-live-belize


How to use this collection: Use this collection of resources to learn more about the scientists being featured in the live broadcasts, about the Carrie Bow Cay Field Station in Belize, and to access resources about coral reef habitats and health.  Download and print the pre- and post-webcast worksheet, or paste the questions into your own Google Classroom assignment (word doc). 


Start a conversation: We suggest using these resources to start a conversation with your students about who does science and how they do it. You can extend their understanding of how real science happens in the field by participating in our live webcasts on Oct. 8, 2019. Here are some questions to help facilitate a conversation with your students:

  • Before reviewing resources: What do you think marine scientists study?  Can you think of an example of a marine habitat? How do you think scientists study marine habitats? What kind of tools do you think they can use to study underwater habitats? 
  • After reviewing resources: Do you have new ideas about what a marine scientist is? What are they? What is something you might have in common a marine scientist? What kind of tools do these marine scientists use for their research? What marine habitat are they studying? What's one way you can observe the world around you, like a scientist?





About the Carrie Bow Cay Field Station, Belize, Central America

The Smithsonian Institution has a field station in Belize, which is located on a small island called Carrie Bow Cay. To get there, scientists must take a 15-mile boat ride from the town of Dangriga, Belize. Researchers from all over the world have been conducting research from this tiny field station for the 50 years that Smithsonian has been operating the station.

The Smithsonian’s Carrie Bow Cay Marine Field Station supports research projects of marine scientists year-round. It offers ready access to a variety of habitats, including thousands of small mangrove islands, countless patch coral reefs, vast seagrass meadows, underwater caves, three off-shore atolls, and the Belize mainland. 

Carrie Bow Cay is located 14 miles offshore, located on the barrier reef off the coast of Belize and within the Mesoamerican Barrier Reef, which contains the largest barrier reef if in the Western Hemisphere and second largest in the world, second only to the Great Barrier Reef in Australia.

This reef system contains many different kinds of coral, which provide homes and food to hundreds of fish species, turtles and countless invertebrates, which are animals without backbones, like snails, squid, sea anemones, sea stars and urchins, and crustaceans like crabs and shrimp.

Coral reefs are important habitats for not just the plants and animals that live there, but for the health of the entire ocean. As our ocean changes, so are coral reefs. 

Scientists use the Carrie Bow Cay marine station to study and monitor these changes. MarineGEO, a global partnership program operated by the Smithsonian Institution, sends scientists to the Carrie Bow Cay marine station every year to monitor these reef systems, along with the other nearby habitats like mangroves and sea grass beds. 


Maggy Benson
15
 

Beyond Monarchs: Animal Migration

This collection starts with monarch butterflies and their migration. My hope was to remind the second graders about what they have already learned about monarchs. 

Once the students' background knowledge is activated then the students can participate in the Tuning In activity. Students will analyze the art piece using the Harvard's Project Zero Thinking Routine: See, Think, Wonder. 

Once the students have made their thinking visible then the class will find more out by learning about the art piece from the artist and learning about bird migrations. The students will engage in the Harvard Global Thinking Routine The 3 Ys.

To push the students beyond flying animals the Going Further section will expose the  students to migrations of animals on land, air, and see. The students will end this section using the Thinking Routine Think, Puzzle, Explore. Students can then have time to research about animals on their own.

Ellen Rogers
19
 

science in art

Robin McLaurin
6
 

Collection of Perceptions

This collection was made as a project for a Bachelors and Liberal Studies course.  The project is an exhibit of different pictures of angels that represent a form of hope in this collection. We know angels as the protectors of the universe and I selected them for this project to represent those who require protection or will require assistance throughout their lives. 

The categories are the Protectors, The Needy, and The Harmed.  The Needy are the images who appear to be silenced by their medical restraints. No-one has noticed their pain.  The Harmed are the pictures that show African American leaders that were assassinated. They were no angels and although the men were critically protected their lack of protection contributed to their death. Those men were not angels. 

The Protectors in this exhibit are the angels that we can and cannot see. The angel images within the rooms we hope and believe them to be within. 

Daliah Bryant
14
 

science in art

Chris Crocker
6
 

Lives of Stars

Explore the life cycle of stars and learn about the connection between elements and space through real-world sources and data and meet Smithsonian experts in the field. This collection includes instructional strategy, student activities, assessment, and extension ideas. Organization is made visible by divider tabs indicating such components as concept understanding, Project Zero thinking routines, and calls to action.

This collection was developed by Sandra Vilevac, STEAM Specialist, Washington International School. See Sandra's other collections.

Keywords: supernova, electromagnetic spectrum, nuclear fusion, space, planetary science


Thank you to our sponsor, the Smithsonian Women’s Committee.

#SmithsonianSTEAM


Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
28
 

Adding the A to STEM: Integrating Portraiture into STEAM/STEM Subjects

This Learning Lab demonstrates how portraiture can be used as an interdisciplinary springboard for lessons in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM). Portraits of STEM pertinent sitters provide a jumping-in point for students, visually grounding them in a subject. In this way, portraiture functions as an interdisciplinary tool to engage students and enrich their learning across curriculum. 

#NPGteach

Briana White
308
 

Putting the A in STEAM. How can prototyping push your thinking?

Putting the "A" in STEAM.                                                                               Can you imagine what doesn't exist but could? Can you visually communicate your vision to others? How can prototyping be used as a tool for exploration, invention and communication. 

louise brady
22
 

Water, Art and Greek Mythology: Achelous and Hercules

A teacher's guide to the painting Achelous and Hercules, by Thomas Hart Benton. This 1947 mural retells an Ancient Greek myth in the context of the American Midwest. Includes the painting, a pdf of the myth "Achelous and Hercules", a supplemental picture guide to the story, a non-fiction article about fresh water from Readworks, and a supplemental worksheet.


Tags: greece, #SAAMTeach , water

Taylor Hummell
6
 

Exploring Solar Power at NMAAHC

The National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) is the first museum on the National Mall to be recognized as a LEED Gold building due to its use of renewable energy sources and locally-sourced building materials. LEED or Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design certifications are granted to buildings and other structures  that meet global standards in areas such as water use, energy efficiency, and use of sustainable materials. One of the ways NMAAHC is using renewable energy is through the use of solar panels on its roof. Although the solar panels are not visible to our visitors, they produce enough energy to power 11 average-sized U.S. homes for a year.

Use this activity to engage your students in a lesson covering solar power, electricity, and the factors that affect its production. 

Keywords: solar, power, STEM, science, LEED, environment, energy, NMAAHC, African American, National Mall

National Museum of African American History and Culture
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