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Found 601 Collections

 

What Goes Up Must Come Down: Plummeting Through the Layers of the Atmosphere

Alan Eustace's world record-breaking skydive started with a ride 25 miles into the stratosphere in a high-altitude balloon. He then plummeted through the increasingly dense atmosphere. Does the atmosphere change with altitude? What challenges did Eustace's team have to overcome to complete the jump? Learn all this and more on this episode of STEM in 30 from the National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution.

National Air and Space Museum
14
 

Rock Me Like a Hurricane: The Science of Earth's Largest Storms

Have you ever wondered what happens inside the eye of a hurricane? Find out what it's like and why it is important to study these storms from space, the ground, and in an airplane. Join STEM in 30 as they experience hurricane force winds at the Liberty Science Center, fly into a hurricane with the US Air Force Hurricane Hunters and talk with Ginger Zee to learn about these massive storms.

National Air and Space Museum
22
 

Your Ticket to Space: Commercial Spaceflight

Orion, Dragon, and Starliner. These are not the names of mythical creatures, or far off vessels. These are the first line of commercial space vehicles ready to take humans to space in the near future. Will you get a ride? In this episode learn about commercial spaceflight and the rockets that will get them into space.

National Air and Space Museum
13
 

STEM in Real Life: Science, Technology, Engineering, Math and More at the National Air and Space Museum

How does Science, Technology, Engineering and Math work in the real world? How can you learn about these subjects through artifacts at the National Air and Space Museum? Can you also learn about art, or music? Find the answers to all of these questions and more on this episode of STEM in 30. Teachers, tune in to this special, 50th episode of STEM in 30 to learn all about STEM in real life.

National Air and Space Museum
11
 

Reboot the Suit: Neil Armstrong's Spacesuit | STEM in 30

“That’s one small step for [a] man, one giant leap for mankind.” Astronaut Neil Armstrong spoke these famous words as he became the first person to walk on the Moon 50 years ago this July. His spacesuit, really a small spacecraft, allowed him to take this historic walk. Join STEM in 30 to learn about the research and conservation efforts that went into ensuring that this suit will last for generations to come.

National Air and Space Museum
23
 

Top of the Tower: How Air Traffic Control Keeps the Skies Safe

Beth learns about what information Air Traffic Controllers are giving to pilots, while Marty tags along with middle school students as they learn how to fly airplanes. They both learn how weather impacts Air Traffic and what was the hardest day to be an Air Traffic Controller.

National Air and Space Museum
15
 

Voyage to the Moon: 50 Years Ago and Today

"Humans first stepped onto the moon 50 years ago and NASA has plans to head back! In this episode hear from those involved with the Apollo program, and learn about the science behind getting to the moon. We will also take a look at the plans to head back to the moon in the near future.

National Air and Space Museum
16
 

Fly Girls: Women in Aerospace

From the time the airplane first took to the air women have played an important role in shaping the aerospace industry. Join STEM in 30 and the first private space explorer, Anousheh Ansari as we take a look at the contributions of early women aviators, female astronauts and other pioneering women.

National Air and Space Museum
16
 

Apollo 12: The Shocking Story

Everyone remembers "One Small Step," but just four months later humans walked on the surface of the moon for a second time. Do you know what Pete Conrad's first words were when he became the third person to walk on the moon? What would you say if you were the first person to walk on Mars? Join Air and Space’s STEM in 30 as they take a look at the Apollo 12 mission from Virginia Air and Space Center. Also learn about the lightning that struck the Saturn V rocket 37 seconds after launch with the help of students from Sterling Middle School.

National Air and Space Museum
16
 

Solving Complex Problems with Simple Machines

Simple machines can be found almost anywhere from nineteenth-century water powered mills, to modern day construction sites. Once you know what to look for you’ll be surprised at how many simple machines you use in your daily life. Join STEM in 30 as they visit many people who work with simple machines every day to complete tasks both big and small.

National Air and Space Museum
13
 

Helicopters the science of vertical flight

The idea of vertical flight has been around for a long time. As early as 400 BC Chinese kids were playing with bamboo flying toys. In the 1480s Leonardo da Vinci made the first recorded advancement in vertical flight when he sketched his aerial screw. We have come a long way since then! This episode of STEM in 30 will explore helicopters: their design, how they work, and the functions they play in our society.

May 11, 2016

National Air and Space Museum
22
 

Mars

A current elementary or middle school student will most likely be the first human to step foot on Mars. In this episode of STEM in 30, we will investigate the plans to send humans to Mars and the ongoing research into water and the possibility of life on the Red Planet.

October 21, 2015


This collection was created to support the 2016 CCSSO Teachers of the Year Day at the Smithsonian.

National Air and Space Museum
28
 

Moon Rocks

Twelve men have walked on the Moon. While the rest of us remain Earth-bound, we've been able to learn about the Moon from the rocks these 12 astronauts brought back for scientific study. We have also found lunar meteorites here on Earth—meteorites produced by impacts hitting the Moon.

May 25, 2016

National Air and Space Museum
32
 

WWI: How History Shaped Technology

98 years ago this week, the United States entered World War I. The Wright brothers had only taken to the sky 14 years before, but airplanes still played a vital role in the war effort. Because of the events of WWI, airplane technology developed at an incredible rate. This fast-paced webcast will look at how airplanes changed in this short timeframe, how other technology advanced, and how airplanes were used throughout WWI.

April 8, 2015

National Air and Space Museum
18
 

Earth Day: A View from Above

The people of Earth didn't see a photo of our planet until the late 1960s. Photos of Earth changed the way we think about our planet. This fast-paced webcast will look at the beginnings of Earth Day and how a better understanding of our place in the universe has evolved through photographic scientific discoveries.

April 22, 2015

National Air and Space Museum
12
 

Living and Working in Space

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to go into space? How about living and working in there? In this program we will explore those questions as well as the benefits and challenges of living and working in space.

May 20, 2015

National Air and Space Museum
17
 

Time and Navigation

If you want to know where you are, you need a good clock. For centuries sailors have used clocks to locate where they are out at sea. Today we use synchronized clocks and orbiting satellites for location. In this episode of STEM in 30, we'll take a look at the challenges of navigating at sea, in the sky, and even in space.

August 26, 2015

National Air and Space Museum
11
 

Asteroid Redirect Mission

In orbit around the Sun are thousands of asteroids ranging in size from grains of sand to miles across. NASA is planning a mission to capture a piece of an asteroid to be studied by NASA scientists and astronauts. In this episode of STEM in 30, we will learn about asteroids, what we can learn from capturing one, and the technology needed to accomplish such a mission.

September 23, 2015

National Air and Space Museum
13
 

Milestones of Flight: The Lindberghs

Charles Lindbergh is probably best known for making the first solo flight across the Atlantic in the Spirit of St. Louis. However, Lindbergh and his wife, Anne Morrow Lindbergh, also reached other milestones in aviation. In 1929 they purchased a Lockheed Sirius airplane and flew it to Asia, proving the viability of traveling from the West to the Far East via the Great Circle route to the north. During a trip through Greenland, a native boy gave the Sirius its nickname: Tingmissartoq, meaning "one who flies like a big bird." This episode of STEM in 30 will explore the Lindberghs' aviation-related accomplishments.

January 27, 2016

National Air and Space Museum
12
 

WWII and Tuskegee Airmen

Before 1941, there weren't any African American pilots in the United States armed forces. The Tuskegee Airmen changed that. With the United States' entry into World War II imminent, the U.S. Army Air Corps (the predecessor to the U.S. Air Force) decided to offer training to African Americans as pilots and mechanics. Called the Tuskegee Airmen because they trained in Tuskegee, Alabama, these airmen made a pioneering contribution to the war and the subsequent drive to end racial segregation in the American military. This episode of STEM in 30 will look at the role African Americans played during the war and how World War II changed aviation history

February 24, 2016

National Air and Space Museum
14
 

Lighter, Stronger, Better: Composites

What makes the Boeing 787 Dreamliner so dreamy? Composites. These engineered materials allow aircraft to be lighter and stronger. Explore composites in this fast-paced webcast: learn what they are, how they are made and how they are used in the aerospace industry.

January 28, 2015

National Air and Space Museum
12
 

Diamonds in the Sky: Stars and Exoplanets

Twinkle, twinkle little...wait a minute, is that a star or something else, and just how "little" is it? What are you actually looking at when you gaze up at the night sky? This is a question that scientists have been wondering for generations. In this episode we will take a look at the night sky observing the stars, planets and exoplanets.

National Air and Space Museum
20
 

Spy Planes: Eyes in the Sky

Quick name some famous spies! Who did you come up with? Jack Ryan? James Bond? Movie spies are fun and resourceful, but real life spies rely on a lot more than fancy gadgets and powerful informants. Real spies need as much information as they can get. In this episode we visit the CIA headquarters to discover how spies gather and interpret intelligence and the specialized planes, cameras and codes they need to do so. We also visit the International Spy Museum to put what we learn to the test.

National Air and Space Museum
14
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