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Found 908 Collections

 

Alvin Ailey

Explore primary sources of Alvin Ailey.

Marcie Atkins
5
 

Like a Fish to Water

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring swimming. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a video about water safety as well as a videos about animals swimming. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
36
 

Museum Hopping

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring Smithsonian Museums. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can see the museums and explore the collections.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
48
 

Pearly Whites

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring teeth. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about teeth as well as explore videos about animal teeth. Families can listen to read alouds and podcasts about teeth. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
25
 

Art & Resistance 3: The Poetry of Joy Harjo (Part B)

The purpose of this Joy Harjo inspired collection is to model for educators distance learning instruction:

  1. using museum artifacts & visual texts to learn/ teach
    • historical/ cultural context for poetry study 
      • as a followup to Art & Resistance 3:  Kent Monkman & Indian Residential Schools (Part A)
  2. using Project Zero thinking routines to interrogate text

"(At Home) On Art and Resiliece: Artist Talk with Kent Monkman" presented by the Hirshhorn Museum inspired me to create a collection that, like his art, speaks to the complicated relationship between between indigenous people and settlers in America. I resonated with Monkman's artistic ethos about the heretofore missing narratives of indigenous people and the limited colonial perspective from which their history is most often told. 

Prior to hearing Monkman speak, I had begun crafting a Smithsonian Learning Lab series of collections centering creators from marginalized groups in America breaking out from preconceptions of their "place" in America's racialized hierarchy.  Art and Resistance 1 is a collection that centers Frederick Douglass as a master of 19th century's version of social media. He wielded his likeness as a weapon against the ubiquity of the anti-black/ racist imagery of his time.  Art and Resistance 2 is an homage to professor, editor, and Nobel & Pulitzer Prize winning novelist Toni Morrison. The collection centers her literary ethos to be among and to write about the African American experience, outside of the white gaze. 

During the Hirshhorn Zoom event, when Monkman spoke of the resiliency of indigenous people, I knew they would be the subject of my next collection.  In view of my students' limited experience interrogating the complexities of Indian History, Monkman's paintings The Scream and The Scoop provided a visceral entrypoint for my students to get engaged in studying the shameful policy of Residential Indian Boarding Schools as historical and cultural context for a subsequent literary study of the poetry of America's Poet Laureate Joy Harjo.


Sher Anderson Petty
20
 

Re-Imagining Migration DC Seminar Series, 2019-2020: Session 4

What does it take to prepare our youth for a world on the move with quality?

This collection is the fourth in a series of five created to support the Re-Imagining Migration DC Seminar Series, held between December 2019 to May 2020. The seminar series is led by Verónica Boix Mansilla, Senior Principal Investigator for Harvard Graduate School of Education's Project Zero, and Research Director for Re-Imagining Migration, with in-gallery experiences provided by educators from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the National Museum of American History, the National Portrait Gallery, the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, and the National Gallery of Art.

This set of collections is designed to be dynamic. We will continue to add material, including participant-created content, throughout the seminar series so that the collections themselves can be used as a type of textbook, reflecting the content, development, and outputs of the full seminar series. Please check back to the hashtag #ReImaginingMigration to see a growing body of materials to support educators as they strive to serve and teach about human migration in relevant and deep ways.

In this session, held online while we are all home social distancing in the time of COVID-19, we will

* examine how immigrant origin youth may be experiencing the epidemic

* experiment with a set of revised socio-emotional thinking routines, and

* gather your input about the ways in which Re-imagining Migration together with the Smithsonian Learning Lab and the National Gallery of Art can support you as you prepare to engage students in digital learning.

#ReImaginingMigration

Re-imagining Migration
29
 

Abstracts to Accompany Poetry Lesson

Have students first answer the question, "Can you enjoy poetry without understanding it?" Usually, in my experience, the answer is no. Use the following pieces of abstract art and ask the same question. Can you deduct anything about the painting by what you see? What do you think about the painting? What is your emotional response? What do you wonder about the painting? By discussing these points, students will see that you can have an emotional reaction and enjoyment or non-enjoyment simply by looking at a piece for its parts. Replicate the same with the poem.

Jennifer Ingraham
8
 

Immigration

#smithstories

Yeferson Manchame
1
 

#ColorOurCollections at the National Portrait Gallery

This Learning Lab collection has been created to encourage learners of all ages to #ColorOurCollections and engage with our portraits! Each coloring page is followed by the portrait in our collection that the coloring page is based on. We invite you to compare and contrast your creation with our collections! What might you add to your portrait? What colors would you use? What choices did you make that were the same as  the choices the original artist made? What choices did you make that were different?

#NPGteach #myNPG

Ashley M. Paxton
47
 

Making a "Kitchen Memories" Family Recipe and Storybook

This collection includes an easy-to-do book project designed to get families talking, creating, and enjoying food together. It can be used as a home project, in the classroom (English, art, social studies), or in an informal learning setting, and can be combined with a family interviewing video project. 

The book is made from a single, large sheet of paper. Click on the demo and accompanying downloadable instructions to get started!

tags: art, crafts, crafting, how-to

Philippa Rappoport
7
 

Cultures

This playlist on different cultures in the United States is designed for self-guided learning with intermittent check-ins for elementary age students. The learning tasks are divided over five days, designed for 30-35 minutes per day, and build on each other. However, students are able to work on this playlist at their own pace. Students have the option to complete the tasks online by connecting through Google classroom or access Google doc versions of each formative and summative assessments for work online and/or offline. By the end of the week, students will write a brief constructed response on why it is important to acknowledge and appreciate the different cultures that exist in the United States.

  • Formative assessments are represented by a chevron (Learning Check In and Tasks).
  • Summative assessments are represented by a circle (Final Task).
  • Google doc versions of all formative and summative assessments are in the tiles immediately after the digital versions. 

*Social Studies and Visual Arts standards vary by state for elementary grades. We recommend educators and caregivers consult their student and child's state standards for these two subjects.

National Museum of American History
63
 

#ColorOurCollections at the National Portrait Gallery

This Learning Lab collection has been created to encourage learners of all ages to #ColorOurCollections and engage with our portraits! Each coloring page is followed by the portrait in our collection that the coloring page is based on. We invite you to compare and contrast your creation with our collections! What might you add to your portrait? What colors would you use? What choices did you make that were the same as  the choices the original artist made? What choices did you make that were different?

#NPGteach #myNPG

Melissa Sorrells
47
 

James Smithson: What's in a Name?

Do you know how the Smithsonian got its name?  If you answered "no" you are not alone.  A lot of people know about the Smithsonian Institution, but they don't know about the man who gave his name and bequest to create what has become the largest museum complex and research center in the world.

Curious?  Well, here's the story...

Laura Shafer
11
 

Future Self Portrait Project

@NPGteach

Both a reflective and goal-setting project, the unit culminates in the creation of a future self-portrait. 

In line with college and career readiness, students reflect on goals and dreams for the future. They combine those with a vision--a portrait--of what they will be in 10 years. They will also create an understanding of specific steps that must be taken in order to turn the vision into reality. 

During the 2018-19 school year, stakeholders involved in Andover Public Schools (USD 385) gathered for a series of discussions about what they expect our students to know and who we want them to become by the time they leave our schools with diplomas. This developed into our Portrait of a Graduate, our district’s vision for our students. If your school doesn't have this kind of "portrait", you might add an additional step where students create their own Portrait of a Graduate. 

I use this project at the end of the year after we have practiced journal writing, reflection on academic endeavors, college and career readiness activities, etc. It allows them to dream of the future in a fun and creative way while gaining a broader understanding of how other express themselves, too. 

On the final thumbnail,  I have included the instructions I used for this unit during distance learning in the Spring of 2020. 

Deborah Eades
12
 

Tuia te here tangata waka | Binding the ties of humanity canoe

This collection is built around a waka Māori currently on display in the National Museum of Natural History.
waka is a traditional canoe. It is designed as a portal to Te Ao Māori - The indigenous worldview  Māori are the native people of New Zealand. Its traditional name is Aotearoa meaning Land of the long white cloud.

This waka was made from a single 100-year old Tōtara tree. Tōtara is a large native New Zealand hardwood that grows throughout the North and South Island. It is light weighted and high natural oil content which prevents rotting or deterioration. Waka are extensions of Māori tribal history and are the traditional technology responsible for mobilising navigators across the Pacific Ocean. The infamous explorer Kupe, discovered New Zealand in 925 AD.

The name of the waka is Tuia te here tangata meaning Binding the ties of humanity. It celebrates the connection established in 1840 between the US Exploring expedition and Māori. The name and physical artefact hope to inspire understanding. The collection aims to digitally illustrate the mauri or life force of the waka. We can transform our wounds into wisdom by seeking first to understand, and then to be understood.

Anahera Hare
66
 

Maps, Globes, and Geography

This playlist on geography is designed for self-guided learning with intermittent check-ins for elementary age students. The learning tasks are divided over five days, designed for 30-35 minutes per day, and build on each other. However, students are able to work on this playlist at their own pace. Students have the option to complete the tasks online by connecting through Google classroom or access Google doc versions of each formative and summative assessments for work online and/or offline. By the end of the week, students design a map of their community.

  • Formative assessments are represented by a chevron (Learning Check In and Tasks).
  • Summative assessments are represented by a circle (Final Task).
  • Google doc versions of all formative and summative assessments are in the tiles immediately after the digital versions. 

*Social Studies and Visual Arts standards vary by state for elementary grades. We recommend educators and caregivers consult their student and child's state standards for these two subjects.

National Museum of American History
54
 

Laughter is the Best Medicine

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring laughter. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also listen to kids' podcast about laughter as well as try not to laugh at a compilation of Elmo's laughter. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
38
 

Design It Yourself: Design an Expressive Letterform

Follow along to design an expressive letterform inspired by 2017 National Design Award Winner for Communication Design, Jennifer Morla

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
20
 

Subject: Christmas

NMAH Photographic History Collection
67
 

Distance Learning: Teaching Persepolis

The purpose of this collection is to model for educators distance learning instruction:

  1. using museum artifacts & visual texts to learn/ teach
    • historical/ cultural context for novel study
  2. using Project Zero thinking routines to interrogate text
Sher Anderson Petty
32
 

Emily Dickinson

Images to use as a discussion launch before each selected poem, addressing elements related to the creation of mood, atmosphere, and sensory imagery (among other topics). #SAAMteach

Annette Spahr
1
 

Social Media

Mai Khanh Nguyen
3
 

How Do Real Historical Resources Help Us Understand Fictional Characters? To Kill a Mockingbird

To explore this "essential question," the resources here offer different contexts for the novel To Kill a Mockingbird. They can help visualize and comprehend the setting of the book and the social issues of the Depression era in the South. With that understanding, students may better apprehend the choices and values of the characters in the novel.

Supporting question: "What was it like to live in small-town Alabama during that time?"

To Kill a Mockingbird is set in the ficticious Maycomb, Alabama, which author Harper Lee modeled on her hometown of Monroeville, Alabama. Students may approach the images from the time period and place of the story (1930s) to consider how race and social class make a difference in how one answers that question.

Supporting question: "What important matters were in the news during that time?"

It's not a fact that Harper Lee based the trial in the novel on the Scottsboro boys, but it may have influenced her. Have students look for similarities and differences. What other events were going on? (e.g., Great Depression).

Have students explain how these resources help understand the characters in the novel.

Brenda Sandbulte
14
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