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Found 542 Collections

 

Easy PZ: Building a Culture of Thinking with Museums

Each Easy PZ collection includes an artwork or museum object and a recorded webinar demonstrating how to use it to develop students' skills with a Harvard Project Zero thinking routine. Supplementary resources provide context relevant to understanding the featured artwork or object.

This collection includes reflections from museum educators on how (and why) to facilitate Project Zero Thinking Routines that encourage learners to engage in the type of thinking or core understanding you are targeting.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
32
 

Coral Reefs and Climate Change

In this activity, you'll explore the vibrant world of coral reefs through videos, an online game, and hands-on activities. You'll learn about what coral is, how groups of them can grow into a reef, and what threats they face with climate changing the ocean temperatures. You'll also meet Smithsonian experts in the field, using cutting-edge technology to combat climate change.  

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
36
 

Future Self Portrait Project

@NPGteach

Both a reflective and goal-setting project, the unit culminates in the creation of a future self-portrait. 

In line with college and career readiness, students reflect on goals and dreams for the future. They combine those with a vision--a portrait--of what they will be in 10 years. They will also create an understanding of specific steps that must be taken in order to turn the vision into reality. 

During the 2018-19 school year, stakeholders involved in Andover Public Schools (USD 385) gathered for a series of discussions about what they expect our students to know and who we want them to become by the time they leave our schools with diplomas. This developed into our Portrait of a Graduate, our district’s vision for our students. If your school doesn't have this kind of "portrait", you might add an additional step where students create their own Portrait of a Graduate. 

I use this project at the end of the year after we have practiced journal writing, reflection on academic endeavors, college and career readiness activities, etc. It allows them to dream of the future in a fun and creative way while gaining a broader understanding of how other express themselves, too. 

On the final thumbnail,  I have included the instructions I used for this unit during distance learning in the Spring of 2020. 

Deborah Eades
12
 

Uncovering America: Transportation

How does transportation affect our daily lives?

What can we learn about transportation and travel from works of art?

Discover compelling stories of creativity, struggle, and resilience in this new set of resources for K–12 educators featuring works of art that reflect the richness and diversity of the people, places, and cultures of the United States. Encourage creative, critical, and historical thinking in your students as you examine works of art from the country’s creation to the present day.

National Gallery of Art
4
 

Uncovering America: People and the Environment

In what ways have Americans impacted the environment?

What is our collective responsibility toward the earth and each other?

How do artists engage with these questions through works of art?

Discover compelling stories of creativity, struggle, and resilience in this new set of resources for K–12 educators featuring works of art that reflect the richness and diversity of the people, places, and cultures of the United States.

National Gallery of Art
4
 

Uncovering America: Manifest Destiny and the West

In what ways was the US settled and unsettled in the 19th century?

What role did artists play in shaping public understandings of the US West?

Discover compelling stories of creativity, struggle, and resilience in this new set of resources for K–12 educators featuring works of art that reflect the richness and diversity of the people, places, and cultures of the United States.

National Gallery of Art
4
 

Uncovering America: Immigration and Displacement

Why do people migrate to and within the United States?

How might works of art help us understand personal experiences of immigration and displacement?

Discover compelling stories of creativity, struggle, and resilience in this new set of resources for K–12 educators featuring works of art that reflect the richness and diversity of the people, places, and cultures of the United States. Encourage creative, critical, and historical thinking in your students as you examine works of art from the country’s creation to the present day.


National Gallery of Art
4
 

Uncovering America: Harlem Renaissance

How do visual artists of the Harlem Renaissance explore black identity and political empowerment?

How does visual art of the Harlem Renaissance relate to current-day events and issues?

How do migration and displacement influence cultural production?

Discover compelling stories of creativity, struggle, and resilience in this new set of resources for K–12 educators featuring works of art that reflect the richness and diversity of the people, places, and cultures of the United States.

National Gallery of Art
4
 

Uncovering America: Gordon Parks Photography

How does Gordon Parks use photography to address inequities in the United States?

How do Gordon Parks’s images capture the intersections of art, race, class, and politics across the United States?

What do photographs in general—and Gordon Parks’s photographs more specifically—tell us about the American Dream?

Discover compelling stories of creativity, struggle, and resilience in this new set of resources for K–12 educators featuring works of art that reflect the richness and diversity of the people, places, and cultures of the United States.

National Gallery of Art
4
 

Uncovering America: Faces of America/Portraits

What is a portrait? What truths and questions does a portrait communicate?

What might a portrait express about the person portrayed? How does it reflect the sitter’s community, setting, family, or friends? What does the portrait reveal about the artist?

Discover compelling stories of creativity, struggle, and resilience in this new set of resources for K–12 educators featuring works of art that reflect the richness and diversity of the people, places, and cultures of the United States.

National Gallery of Art
4
 

Uncovering America: Expressing the Individual

How is identity shaped, formed, and expressed?

How can works of art help us understand our world and ourselves more fully?

Discover compelling stories of creativity, struggle, and resilience in this new set of resources for K–12 educators featuring works of art that reflect the richness and diversity of the people, places, and cultures of the United States.

National Gallery of Art
4
 

Uncovering America: Civil War and Its Aftermath

How do we remember the Civil War?

Whose stories are told in the art and memorials from and about the time period?

Discover compelling stories of creativity, struggle, and resilience in this new set of resources for K–12 educators featuring works of art that reflect the richness and diversity of the people, places, and cultures of the United States.

National Gallery of Art
4
 

Uncovering America: Art and the Great Depression

Does art “work” or have a purpose? How?

Is making art a form of work? Make your argument for why or why not.

Franklin Delano Roosevelt stated that art in America has never been the sole province of a select group or class of people. Do you agree or disagree?

Define what you think Roosevelt meant by “the democratic spirit.” How do you think art can represent democratic values?

Discover compelling stories of creativity, struggle, and resilience in this new set of resources for K–12 educators featuring works of art that reflect the richness and diversity of the people, places, and cultures of the United States.

National Gallery of Art
4
 

Uncovering America: Activism and Protest

Why and how do people protest?

How might works of art show support or advocate for a cause?

How are people, communities, and events affected by works of art?

Discover compelling stories of creativity, struggle, and resilience in this new set of resources for K–12 educators featuring works of art that reflect the richness and diversity of the people, places, and cultures of the United States. Encourage creative, critical, and historical thinking in your students as you examine works of art from the country’s creation to the present day.

National Gallery of Art
4
 

Teaching Critical Thinking through Art with the National Gallery of Art

The resources in this collection are pulled directly from the National Gallery of Art’s online course Teaching Critical Thinking through Art. Based on the popular Art Around the Corner professional development program for teachers in Washington, D.C., this five-unit online course provides everything you need to begin creating a culture of critical thinking and collaboration for any classroom, subject, or level. You do not need an art background or museum access to successfully integrate the course materials into your teaching. Your willingness to experiment with new teaching practices is all that is required.

Find demonstrations, lesson plans, and videos here on the edX platform! Now in English, Español, Français, and 简体中文

National Gallery of Art
21
 

Easy PZ: Building a Culture of Thinking in the Classroom

Each Easy PZ collection includes an artwork or museum object and a recorded webinar demonstrating how to use it to develop students' skills with a Harvard Project Zero thinking routine. Supplementary resources provide context relevant to understanding the featured artwork or object.

This collection includes reflections from a teacher and an instructional coach on how (and why) to facilitate Project Zero Thinking Routines that encourage learners to engage in the type of thinking or core understanding you are targeting.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
20
 

Follow that Bird! A Science and Technology Unit on Tracking Birds

Welcome to Follow That Bird! A Science and Technology Unit on Tracking Birds. The goal of this inquiry-based unit is to teach core middle-school science concepts through student exploration of the tools used by Smithsonian scientists to track birds, the data they collect and how new information is used for conservation.

Smithsonian's National Zoo and Conservation Biology Institute
45
 

Design It Yourself: Design an Expressive Letterform

Follow along to design an expressive letterform inspired by 2017 National Design Award Winner for Communication Design, Jennifer Morla

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
20
 

Design it Yourself: Design a Prototype for a User

Learn to think like a designer by prototyping a solution engineered for a specific user. 

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
23
 

Easy PZ: "See, Think, Wonder" and "Think, Feel, Care"

Each Easy PZ collection includes an artwork or museum object and a recorded webinar demonstrating how to use it to develop students' skills with a Harvard Project Zero thinking routine. Supplementary resources provide context relevant to understanding the featured artwork or object.

This collection models the routines "See / Think / Wonder" with "Think, Feel, Care" alongside children's stories and museum resources from the Smithsonian. #visiblethinking 

Tags: Three Billy Goats Gruff, troll, bridge, reading

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
31
 

The Impact of the Civil War on Society

Students will explore these sources to spark inquiry and investigation about how the Civil War impacted American society. 

  • Students can complete the sorting activity to categorize the images. 
  • Students should select one source they find most intriguing and generate questions  about the source and its related topic by completing the quiz question. 
Tiferet Ani
30
 

Introducing Hokusai: Mad about Painting

This Learning Lab Collection introduces three themes from the Hokusai:  Mad about Painting exhibition and provides works of art, classroom activities, and discussion questions associated with each theme. 

Tags:  #AsiaTeachers; Be a Reporter; customs; daily life; dragons; Edo; Great Wave; Hokusai; Japan; nature; New Year; personification; poetry; power; Project Zero; Mount Fuji; See Think Wonder; Step Inside; symbols; thunder; woodblock print

About the exhibition:

Hokusai:  Mad about Painting
November 23, 2019–November 8, 2020
Freer Gallery of Art, galleries 5–8

The Japanese artist Katsushika Hokusai (1760–1849) is widely recognized for a single image—Great Wave Off the Coast of Kanagawa, an icon of global art—yet he produced thousands of works throughout his long life. Charles Lang Freer recognized the artist’s vast abilities before many other collectors, and he assembled the world’s largest collection of paintings, sketches, and drawings by Hokusai. In commemoration of the centennial of Freer’s death in 1919, and in celebration of the Summer Olympics in Tokyo in 2020, the Freer Gallery presents a yearlong exploration of the prolific career of Katsushika Hokusai. Works large and small are on view, from six-panel folding screens and hanging scrolls to paintings and drawings. Also included are rare hanshita-e, drawings for woodblock prints that were adhered to the wood and frequently destroyed in the process of carving the block prior to printing. Among the many featured works are Hokusai’s manga, his often-humorous renderings of everyday life in Japan. Together, these works reveal an artistic genius who thought he might finally achieve true mastery in painting—if he lived to the age of 110.


Freer and Sackler Galleries
25
 

Explore: Mask Design

In this collection, explore the history, evolution, and meaning of masks through multiple perspectives. Harvard Project Zero Thinking Routines are included at the end to help guide discussion and reflection of design choices, local and global impact, and ways that masks protect and conceal the wearer. 

Suggested instructions for use: This collection was designed to be modular and a survey of the masks available at the Smithsonian. Each section begins with an essential question, followed by several masks that help explore the key concept. Teachers may facilitate Project Zero Thinking Routines before and/or after students look closely at each section. Students may want to jot down notes in response to the essential question in preparation for a group discussion.

Additional questions to guide investigation:

  • How does belief shape our response to worldly concerns?
  • How does the body's needs and shape dictate the designs we create?
  • How does new knowledge change our decisions? What "old" knowledge gets carried forward and why?
  • Where are we vulnerable in our bodies?

This collection was created in collaboration by:

To read more about the research process the team used in creating this collection, please visit the supplementary Smithsonian Learning Lab blog post.

Keywords: cfch, chsdm, nmah, saam, sclda, ppe, face covering, protection, design, making, community, fashion, production, identity, inquiry, art, culture, medicine, science

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
74
 

Flashcard Activity: Tools and Innovation

This collection traces innovation in various types of tools over time.  Approach in small groups or as a classroom to have students explore the essential questions: What makes something innovative?  How do you define innovation? 

Supporting questions and activity implementation ideas are located under this collection's Information (i) button.  This activity works equally well online or using printed flashcards (see the resource tile). 

Keywords: invention, flash cards, conceptual understanding

Tess Porter
37
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