Skip to Content
  • Language
  • End User
  • Educational Use
  • Time Required
(1,030)
(5,297)
(5,427)
(3,959)
(6,026)
(68)
(2,152)
(1,565)
(672)
(2,811)
(1,077)
(953)

Found 6,327 Collections

 

Trouble in Saudi Arabia

Ian Anderson, Ellis video project

Trouble in Saudi Arabia (VIDEO)


#CIEDigitalStoryTelling

Ian Anderson
9
 

Bubonic plague

#CIEDigitalStoryTelling

https://www.wevideo.com/view/1...

SARAY FERNANDEZ
8
 

Assisted Suicide/Death with dignity

#CIETEACHART

#CIEDIGITALSTORYTELLING

Kahliyah Wood
7
 

Video

#CIEDigitialStoryTelling.
OSMAR CHACON
1
 

Fauvism

By Stevie Mbenza #CIETeachArt

STEVIE MBENZA
7
 

Cubism

#CIETeachArt

Olivia Edgar
12
 

Art Deco

Art movement of Art Deco 

In this collection its going to speak about:

Historical context

Major Features of this movement

Major inspiration 

Standout artist from the movement 

Examples of art from this period

How this art movement influenced future art movements/artist

#CIETEACHART

VALERIE MONTENEGRO
28
 

Arts and Crafts Movement

emerged from the attempt to reform design and decoration in mid 19th century.

#CIETeachArt

Makayla Curry
15
 

Social Realism by LeJanise Fuster

#CIETeachArt

LeJanise Fuster
6
 

Post Impressionism

#CIETeachArt

Akira Jones
12
 

La Purisima Mission Visitor Center

Explore the wonders behind the La Purisima Mission Visitor Center!  In this unit, you will find a link to a Self-Guided Interactive Tour and numerous photographs that document the stories behind La Purisima Mission.

La Purísima Mission CA State Historic Park
41
 

Expressionism: Art of Emotion

#CIETeachArt

Maritza Medina
13
 

Culture Lab Manifesto Collection: A Culture of Beauty

This collection was created by Aira Matin, a Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center intern. Aira applied one of our Culture Lab Manifesto tenets, "A Culture of Beauty: Who gets to decide what counts as beautiful? Question aesthetic classifications and priorities," in her search for objects that may add to, challenge or spark this dialogue. Below is a statement of her process and inspiration for this collection, and may support classroom discussions on race, gender, inclusion and social media. 

"A glance at how the aesthetics of Asian Pacific American cultures have been presented, embraced, celebrated, and manipulated in society. For this collection, I went through searches around Asian Pacific American cultures to look at both things that were considered traditionally beautiful and things with beauty not as direct. Examining objects from paintings to designed plates helped to explore what was considered beautiful in many different lenses. The goal was to look at and analyze the presence of beauty in different forms, from stereotypes in Hollywood to architecture, and interpret what these symbolized for a larger society." --Aira Matin

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
26
 

Culture Lab Manifesto Collection: A Culture of Action

This collection was created by Aira Matin, a Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center intern. Aira applied one of our Culture Lab Manifesto tenets, "A Culture of Action: Stay woke. We have a social contract with one another to protect the vulnerable and ensure human rights for everyone," in her search for objects that may add to, challenge or spark this dialogue. Below is a statement of her process and inspiration for this collection, and may support classroom discussions on race, immigration, migration, activism, gender, inclusion and social media.

"What were the different forms of marginalization and discrimination against Asian Pacific American communities, and how did such oppression lead to action being taken to assert their place as equal citizens in the United States? For this collection, I examined different principles and foundations for oppression and prejudice against Asian Pacific Americans, as well as the different ways that these communities took action against such marginalization to represent themselves as equal Americans." --Aira Matin

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
23
 

The National Numismatic Collection's East Asian Currency Highlights

Established in the mid-19th century, several of the earliest additions to the NNC were artifacts from Japan, Korea, and China, including coins and medals gifted to President Ulysses S. Grant from Japanese Emperor Meiji (received in 1881) and the 2,025 East Asian coins, amulets, and notes from George Bunker Glover’s private collection (received in 1897). These donations were the foundation of the NNC’s East Asian holdings, which continues to grow with new acquisitions, such as the Howard F. Bowker collection in 2017. 

Emily Pearce Seigerman
94
 

La Purisima Mission State Historic Park Ruins to Rebuild

In 1834, secularization of the 21 Missions of California was enforced.  This meant California Missions were either converted into Catholic Churches or converted to ranches, or to other uses.  As a result, La Purísima Mission property and land holdings were divided into ranches.

As the years progressed, the property was bought and sold a number of times. In 1845, La Purísima Mission was sold to Juan Temple of Los Angeles for $1,000. At the close of the 19th century the property was so badly neglected the adobe buildings, and other features of the Mission eventually collapsed from weather and lack of upkeep.

In 1933, the Union Oil Company obtained ownership of La Purísima Mission for oil speculation, and the condition of the Mission was in complete ruin. It wasn't until 1934, when preservation and reconstruction of the Mission began through efforts of the County of Santa Barbara, the State of California, the National Park Service, and the Civilian Conservation Corps. 

This collection shows the neglect and decay of the adobe buildings at  La Purísima  Mission through the lens of history.



Brad Krey
15
 

Martin Luther King, Jr.: Highlights Collection

This is a Smithsonian Learning Lab topical collection, which contains images, text, recordings, and other multimedia resources that may complement the Tween Tribune feature, Martin Luther King, Jr. found inspiration in Henry David Thoreau. Use these resources to introduce or augment your study of this topic. If you want to personalize this collection by changing or adding content, click the Sign Up link above to create a free account.  If you are already logged in, click the copy button to initiate your own version. Learn more here

Grace Davis
49
 

What's a Lichen? How a Smithsonian Scientist Studies a Unique Symbiosis

This collection supports the free Smithsonian Science How webcast, "What's a Lichen? How a Smithsonian Scientist Studies a Unique Symbiosis,"  scheduled to air on November 14, 2019. Manu is a scientist at the Smithsonian who studies lichens, a lichenologist. She collects lichens from all over the world, depositing them into the U.S. National Herbarium, which is located at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History. Manu identifies the lichens she collects with observations of how the lichen looks, their DNA data and where they were found.

Lichens are a symbiotic relationship between algae and fungus. They have been on earth for millions of years, living on rocks, trees, and soil in all different habitats on all seven continents. Even though lichens are all around us, scientists are still learning about what they are, where they live, and how many different species of lichens there are.

Fungus is any group of spore-producing organisms feeding on organic matter, and include molds, yeast, mushrooms, and toadstools. Algae is a simple, non-flowering plant. Algae contain chlorophyll and produce sugar through photosynthesis, like other plants, but do not have true stems, roots, leaves, or vascular tissue like most other plants. Lichenization is a fungal lifestyle, and therefore the name of lichen is the name of the fungus component.

When you look at a lichen, what you’re looking at is the “house” that the fungus and algae grow together. Scientists call this house a “thallus.” When algae and fungus come together to form this house, we see a lichen. This partnership is called a symbiotic relationship, because it helps both the fungus and algae survive. Research has shown that lichens are not a natural biological group, meaning they do not all come from a single common ancestor, in other words, lichens have many origins. Currently there are almost 20,000 species of lichenized fungi known.

In this symbiotic relationship, the fungus and algae benefit from being associated with each other. The fungus provides the house, its shelter (the thallus). This shelter helps the algae survive in habitats where it would otherwise be exposed to the elements and possibly could not survive. The algae provide food for the fungus, in the form of sugar. The sugar is a byproduct of photosynthesis that occurs within the algae.

Lichens are very important for the environment. They are an important food source for many animals, provide nest materials for birds, and provide habitat and material for biomimicry for insects and other organisms.

Lichens are also important for humans by providing natural dyes, perfumes, litmus paper, and even food. Humans even use lichens as bio-indicators, organisms that help humans monitor the health of the environment. Some species of lichens are sensitive to environmental pollution, so their presence or absence can help us understand more about the health of the environment, like air quality. 

Lichens produce over one thousand different chemical compounds, most of them unique to lichens. These compounds include acids and pigments. Some chemicals may even fluoresce under UV light, making them important components for lichen identification.

Lichens have DNA, which is used to identify lichen and compare relationships amongst and within species. DNA analysis has been an important tool for lichenologists in identifying and understanding the biodiversity of lichens.


Sign up for the Smithsonian Science How webcast to introduce your students to Lichenologist Manuela Dal Forno! The program airs at 11am and 2pm on November 14, 2019. Sign up and view the program here: https://naturalhistory.si.edu/...

Maggy Benson
29
 

Dada

#CIETeachArt

Ziani Deliz
13
 

Native American Art

Kelly McCarthy
4
 

The History and Spread of Islam

This collection can be used by students to explore the founding, history, and spread of Islam. Includes short informational texts paired with artifacts from around the globe and some links to additional resources. Students are tasked with tracking the countries that are mentioned on a map, taking notes on how the religion spread, and how the religion may have changed as it spread to new areas and ethnic groups. There is a quiz to assess their understanding of these concepts at the end.

The guiding questions for this collection are:
1) Where was Islam founded and where did it spread?
2) How did the religion spread from place to place?
3) How were the practices and the beliefs adapted by the people of different geographic areas?

Maritt Wolfrom
36
4681-4704 of 6,327 Collections