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Found 6,914 Collections

 

How Radio Changed America

The technology for radio communications advanced during World War I, but it wasn't until the 1920s that commercial broadcasting grew and everyone wanted a radio for their home. Radio had a huge impact on creating a "mass media" that bound together the nation. As students explore this collection, they will look for evidence proving that radio changed America in four different areas:
-Politics
-Entertainment and Sports
-Religion
-Advertising

Possible assignments using this collection include:
1) Writing an essay evaluating the statement "Radio created a mass culture in America."
2) Researching a particular figure in radio's early history and sharing findings with classmates.
3) Creating a 1920s radio program that featured key people and trends from the decade. This could be recorded and shared in the form of a podcast.
4) Developing a chart comparing and contrasting the impact of radio with television or the internet.
Kate Harris
25
 

Pearl Harbor

A quick search of artifacts related to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii and some on World War II aviation

#MCteach

Sara Ducey
24
 

Designing Change with Postage Stamp

Resources available for teachers to challenge students to solve an interdisciplinary challenge, which is to have the students design semi-postal stamp.
Motoko Hioki
8
 

CURIO Learning Lab Game

CURIO is a trading card game that challenges you to discover patterns and connections to create your own museum-inspired collections. While the printed version of cards is available only as a special giveaway at select educational conferences and events, you can download and print the game using the PDF file below.

From Egyptian mummies to postage stamps, you'll learn about amazing artifacts and artworks in the Smithsonian while having fun collecting cards with your friends.

Players create a collection of at least three cards having a specific theme. They collect new cards by trading with other players. At the end of the game, players present their collections and have other players guess the themes. For 3-8 players.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
54
 

My Smithsonian Closet

You could be exceptionally well-dressed if the Smithsonian were your closet.

Darren Milligan
30
 

Space Exploration: The Early Years

A collection of resources depicting space exploration from 1957 to 1969.
Linda Muller
35
 

The Maya People Today

This collection includes many videos, in English and Spanish, and resources showing how the Mayan people living today have preserved their traditions while adjusting to modern life. Students can use the collection to learn about the values and traditions that remain important in Mayan life today.

Those who want to learn more about the ancient Maya should view this collection:
https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/the-achievements-of-ancient-mayan-civilization/Cb7G8r7LdVF6mGqm
Kate Harris
23
 

The Achievements of Ancient Mayan Civilization

This collection reviews the major achievements of the ancient Mayan civilization, including its great cities, use of writing, calendar, religious beliefs, art, and architecture. Resources are provided as a basis for student research. Several of the videos are available in Spanish and English and would be useful for a Spanish language teacher who wants students to research the Maya.

Guiding questions to consider while reviewing this collection:
1) In what ways did observation of the sun influence multiple facets of ancient Mayan life?
2) Which elements of ancient Mayan life persist in Mayan culture today?
3) How are art, religion, and architecture seemingly intertwined in ancient Mayan culture?
4) What are the various theories about the demise of the ancient Mayans?

This collection focuses on the achievements of the ancient Mayans; however, it is critical to remember that the Maya are a living people and continue to preserve old traditions while building new ones in the modern world. For those interested, here is a collection on the modern Maya: https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/the-maya-people-today/yKMyzCEPMadkGgA8.
Kate Harris
25
 

How Siddhartha Became the Buddha

This collection teaches students about the biography of Siddhartha Guatama and asks them to analyze images depicting stages of his life. Students will also learn about the different mudras, or hand gestures, that the Buddha makes. Quiz questions and hot spots are embedded throughout to check for understanding and support learning.

Tags: Siddhartha, Buddha, Buddhism, reincarnation, religion, India

Kate Harris
12
 

Japanese Internment through Art and Documents

These resources can be used in an activity that introduces a lesson on Japanese-American Internment during World War II.

1. To begin, show students Roger Shimomura's painting entitled Diary: December 12, 1941. Without providing any background information, use the "Claim, Support, Question" routine to have students make claims about what they think is going on in the artwork, identify visual support for their claims, and share the questions they have about the painting. Document responses in three columns on large chart paper or a whiteboard.

2. Following this initial conversation, share the title, artist's name, and date of the painting. Ask students to consider the date in the title, and discuss what significance this date might have. If they don't figure out that this date was five days after the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor, share that information. Share with students that this painting is part of a series Roger Shimomura created based on the wartime diary entries of his grandmother, Toku, who was born in Japan and immigrated to Seattle, Washington in 1912. Along with thousands of other people of Japanese ancestry living on the West Coast during World War II , Toku and her family were forcibly relocated to an internment camp after the attack on Pearl Harbor. Roger was a young boy during World War II, and remembers spending his third birthday in the Puyallup Assembly Center on the Washington state fairgrounds, where his family was sent before being transferred to Minidoka Reservation in Idaho for the duration of the war.

3. Jigsaw Activity, Pt. 1. After sharing this context, tell students they will each be receiving a primary source document that relates to the painting in some way. Distribute copies of "Woman at Writing Table," the Superman comic, the Instructions to All Persons of Japanese Ancestry, and Toku Shimomura's diary entries. Divide students into four groups, one per document. Give students time to analyze their document as a group and discuss how it affects their interpretation of the painting.

4. Jigsaw Activity, Pt. 2. Next, create new groups so that each group includes students who received each of the four sources. Ask students to briefly report on their document and what their original group discussed as its possible meaning and relation to Roger Shimomura's painting.

5. Return to the painting as a large group, and discuss how the primary source documents have influenced students' reading of the artwork.

6. Optional additional resource: If time allows, have students watch excerpts from Roger Shimomura's artist talk at the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

#APA2018

#visiblethinking

Phoebe Hillemann
8
 

Classic American Stories: Moby Dick

This Collection was created to support reading the novel, Moby Dick by American author Herman Melville. It includes resources in the form of online texts, videos, artwork, and photographic images.
Linda Muller
16
 

Identifying Characteristics of Renaissance Art

This collection will teach you about how Renaissance artists changed the style and focus of art in the period between 1300 and 1600 CE. When you are done, you should be able to thoroughly answer the question: How did the art of the Renaissance reflect the new emphasis on humanism and science?

First, review the painting, Raphael's School of Athens, and learn about the new techniques used.
Then study the additional works in the collection and try to use them as examples of the different techniques. Some of the works are from the Renaissance period and others are more modern interpretations. A worksheet is included at the end of this collection to record your work.
Finally, test your knowledge with a quick quiz. Use your worksheet to help!
Kate Harris
11
 

Jainism

This is a topical collection of resources related to Jainism. It includes sculptures, manuscripts, and paintings from the Smithsonian Institution's collection as well as links to outside web resources for further background information. Some questions to guide thinking are embedded throughout.

As they explore the collection, users might consider how Jain art and architecture reflect the main beliefs of the religion.

tags: ancient, India, religion, Jain, tirthankara, Mahavira, faith, Digambara, Svetambara

Kate Harris
12
 

"...Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death!"

This teaching collection includes resources such as postage stamps, artworks and dramatic readings related to Patrick Henry, a Founding Father of the United States, who famously ended his speech at the Virginia Convention on March 23, 1775, with the phrase "...give me liberty or give me death." Also included are suggested Speech Analysis Questions from ReadWriteThink to support careful examination of Henry's speeches. Guiding Question: How did this speech inspire change in the colonies? Use textual evidence to support your answer.
Ashley Naranjo
8
 

Thomas Paine's "Common Sense"

This teaching collection includes resources such as a dramatic reading, an online exhibition, a postage stamp, and an article related to Thomas Paine, a Founding Father of the United States, who famously authored the influential pamphlet, "Common Sense". Also includes excerpts of "Common Sense" and a Document Analysis Sheet with suggested questions for in-depth examination. Guiding Question: How did this document inspire change in the colonies? Use textual evidence to support your answer.
Ashley Naranjo
7
 

Designing Change with Postage Stamp

Resources available for teachers to challenge students to solve an interdisciplinary challenge, which is to have the students design a semi-postal stamp.
Motoko Hioki
6
 

Shinto Shrines

How do religious rituals and practices reflect the core beliefs of a religion? This collection creates a virtual field trip to a Shinto shrine. Shinto is the indigenous religion of Japan, based on cultivating a positive relationship with the kami, or spirits present in the world. The religion of Shinto is centered around four affirmations. They are:

-Tradition and the family

-Love of nature

-Physical cleanliness

-Matsuri (festivals and ceremonies in honor of the kami)

Guiding questions include:

How are the four affirmations expressed in a visit to a Shinto shrine?

How does a shrine visit compare to visits to other houses of worship?

Tags: religion, culture, Japan, Shinto, shrines, analysis, compare contrast

Kate Harris
14
 
 

Tree Banding

Tree banding is one of the activities included in the SHOUT program, a two-year investigation of land and water issues led by Smithsonian scientists. Watch the videos to learn how to band trees and collect data about their growth and why this information matters.
Stephanie Norby
6
 

Scientific Argumentation

The archived sessions from a two-part online course led by Dr. Victor Sampson, Associate Professor of STEM Education at the University of Texas at Austin, on scientific argumentation -- helping students to identify, evaluate and support claims. See Smithsonian collections used during the sessions at https://s.si.edu/1L0YP81 .
Stephanie Norby
2
 

California Gold Rush

Was the gold rush of 1849 a boon for California? Why or why not? What were the short-term and long-term benefits and detriments of the gold rush? What are the similarities and differences between the California gold rush and the Marcellus Shale gas boon in Pennsylvania? What lessons can we learn from the California gold rush that translates to the current Marcellus Shale natural gas boon in Pennsylvania?
Linda Muller
22
 

Visual Connections between Buddhism and Ancient Greece

Using the Project Zero Visible Thinking routine "See Think Wonder," this activity investigates the cultural connections between Ancient Greece, Rome, and Gandhara* as seen through a sculpture of the Buddha created in the 2nd century CE. Buddhist sculptures from Gandhara are significant not only because they show the extent of Alexander the Great's influence on Asia, but also because they are some of the first human depictions of the Buddha in the history of Buddhist art.

Even without a deep knowledge of the art of this period, students can make visual observations and comparisons that reveal the blending of Asian and Greco-Roman culture in this particular region.

*Gandhara is a region in what is now modern Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Keywords: greek, kushan, mathura, india, inquiry strategy, classical, roman, gautama, siddhārtha, siddhartha, shakyamuni, lakshanas, signs of the buddha

#visiblethinking

Tess Porter
6
 

Housekeeping

A collection with housekeeping images from different cultures and times. A parent could ask: How has housekeeping changed over time? What are some of the tasks in order to keep a house? What are people doing in the images? What are the tools you use?
Stephanie Norby
24
433-456 of 6,914 Collections