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Found 480 Collections

 

Writing Inspiration: Using Art to Spark Narrative Story Elements

The Smithsonian museum collection inspires many to research the history behind artifacts, but this collection explores the use of art and artifacts to spark creative story writing. Students will choose artifacts to craft characters, a setting, and a plot conflict to create and write a narrative story.

Targeted Vocabulary: Narrative, protagonist , antagonist, character, character traits, setting, plot, climax, and conflict.

After reading and analyzing several narrative stories for story elements such as character, setting, plot, climax, and conflict, students will use this collection to begin planning their own narrative stories.
Individuals or partners will first view the portraits and discuss possible stories behind each face before choosing a protagonist, antagonist, and supporting characters. They may begin to discuss and imagine character traits for each subject.
Next, the student will select a landscape setting in which the story may take place. The writer will describe the landscape, imagine a time period, and name the location.
Finally, the student will either choose an action artifact around which to build a major plot event, or have that slide as a minor scene in their story.
Students may use the Question Formulation Technique to garner ideas for background stories behind the faces. http://rightquestion.org/
Once the story elements are in place, the students may begin to draft narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.

With the artifacts selected as the major story elements, the students may begin crafting their narrative story. The artifacts can then be displayed as illustrations in the published narratives.
Susan Stokley
66
 

Reading Companion: Robots

This collection is a reading companion to two articles - "Robot Zoo" [Ask; Nov 2011] and "Me, Myself, and My Android Twin" [Muse; Nov 2012]. Students are asked to investigate these articles, alongside other objects, videos, and articles, to examine what issues robot designers are attempting to address with their inventions, and how they are trying to address them. At the end of the activity, students will be asked to write a paragraph or more explaining which inventions they think are the most important and why, citing resources in this collection as evidence.
Tess Porter
22
 

Reading Companion: Pandas

This collection is a reading companion to two articles included here as PDFs - "A Symbol of Peace: The Giant Panda" [Faces; May 2007], "Something New at the Zoo" [Ask; July 2015], and "Panda Handstands Get High Marks" [Ask; March 2005].

Several videos feature panda behavior and habitat. The TED talk by a Smithsonian scientist raises questions about our love affair with pandas.

Together the resources offer several options for comparing and contrasting informational text with science content.
Michelle Smith
17
 

How Did Artists View the Civil War? A Collection using a Visible Thinking Strategy

This collection uses a visible thinking strategy called "See-Think-Wonder" from Harvard's Project Zero to help students analyze a Civil-War era sketch to determine context and perspective. After completing the routine, students will learn more about the image and the artist who made it, as well as view art representing a very different point of view.

For more on this strategy, see the "Notes to Other Users."
Kate Harris
8
 

Lewis and Clark: an expedition across America

Who were Lewis and Clark? Where did they go? Why did they go? Who sent them? Who did they meet along the way? What dangers did they face? Did anyone help them?
This is a Collection of resources including images, videos, text, online exhibits, and a lesson plan that support Lewis and Clark's expedition across American in the early 1800s.
Linda Muller
32
 

Gettysburg Address

Why was the Gettysburg Address one of the most famous speeches in American history? This Collection contains images that illustrate how President Abraham Lincoln looked during this period in history; information that explains how Lincoln came to be in Gettysburg and images of where he delivered his famous speech; the Nicolay copy of the Gettysburg Address along with a video recitation of the speech; and, an image of the statue that memorializes the event that occurred at Gettysburg National Military Park, PA.
Linda Muller
14
 

Women's Suffrage

The Woman's Suffrage movement in America began in 1848 at the Seneca Falls Convention in an effort to allow women the right to vote.
Linda Muller
20
 

Macaroni Boy

This Collection features a variety of primary and secondary resources including maps, photographs, texts, and a sound clip to support the historical context of the book, Macaroni Boy.
Linda Muller
22
 

Runaway in an Unknown Land: The Underground Railroad in Western Pennsylvania

Prior to the Civil War, enslaved people had little chance of securing their freedom. There were rare cases of freedom being purchased by the enslaved individual or by some benefactor. Even rarer was the granting of freedom papers by the master. For those who desired to taste freedom, the choice of running was often the only viable choice. Runaways faced incredible dangers en route including the possibility of capture.
Arthur Glaser
29
 

The Dred Scott Case


The Dred Scott case was one of America's most controversial Supreme Court decisions. Who was Dred Scott and did he have a right to his freedom?
The goal of this Collection is to engage students to read and research people and texts that comprised this historical event then write a persuasive essay based on opinion gathered from details and facts procured from their readings and research.

Keywords:
Dred Scott
Dred Scott vs Sanford
Dred Scott vs Sandford
U.S. Supreme Court
Supreme Court
Chief Justice Taney
Declaration of Independence
Missouri Compromise
Emancipation
Freedom
Slavery
Abolition
Pre Civil War Era
Linda Muller
9
 

Clothing Across Cultures

This teaching collection was made to accompany the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum lesson plan "Saris, Kimonos, Togas & Smocks: Exploring Clothing Across Cultures." In addition to saris, kimonos, togas, and smocks, huipils and kanga are used as examples of culturally-specific clothing.

The lesson asks students to complete think about the cultural importance of clothing, and then to research a specific type of clothing and build a presentation around that research. Students might use this collection as a source for images for their presentation, to inspire research topics, or as a common basis for discussion with their peers.
Kate Harris
32
 

Running Fence

This teaching collection includes images and video of Running Fence, a work of installation art by Christo and Jean Claude. Included at the end is a lesson plan that engages students in analysis of Running Fence and details the steps for a student-designed installation art work at their school.

Learning goals include:
• Define installation art
• Analyze the process and results of the work of Jean-Claude and Christo to develop Running Fence
• Use the design process to develop a proposal for an installation art piece
• Use persuasive speaking skills to pitch your plan to the relevant stakeholders in your school community
• Plan and execute a piece of installation art on your school grounds, working cooperatively with a team
Kate Harris
46
 

International Picnic Day- June 18

This collection celebrates the #HashtagHoliday of #InternationalPicnicDay. A picnic is an outing or occasion that involves taking a packed meal to be eaten outdoors. Often, picnics take place at urban parks or on the shores of a beachfront and are enjoyed in large groups, typically families. In this collection, you will view images of picnic scenes and a vibrant picnic poster series from the 1970s and 1980s. This collection includes a creative writing prompt around describing event sequences and using imagery in your writing. It was adapted from the Smithsonian's collection of "Summer Picnic" posters https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/summer-picnic/X7Rh5kBN7xYwnDoH.
Ashley Naranjo
26
 

English Language Learning with Artifacts and Portraits

This collection for teachers brings together relevant learning resources and an archived webinar (collaboration between the Smithsonian and American English "Shaping the Way We Teach English" webinars from the U.S. Department of State). It includes a webinar with three educators from the National Museum of American History, National Portrait Gallery and the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access. During the webinar, strategies are explored for engaging students in looking at and analyzing portraits, as well as eliciting thoughtful questions about objects that help tell a story. The webinar also features an emphasis on how visuals, such as collection objects, photographs, artworks and videos with experts, can serve as a springboard for rich discussions and inspire curiosity in the classroom and beyond.
Ashley Naranjo
21
 

American Melting Pot - American Corner Trieste

ESL Lesson Plan - Middle School
Denise Tecchio
12
 

The Middle Ages: Discover the Story

This collection includes objects and artifacts representing life in the Middle Ages. Students are challenged to write a creative story or narrative based on the objects in the collection, illustrating life at the time. The last two resources in the collection are a worksheet that teachers may use to frame the assignment and a grading rubric for the assignment.
Kate Harris
12
 

Slavery in Western Pennsylvania

How was freedom achieved in PA?

Students will compare/contrast a slave's choice to runaway for freedom or wait for gradual emancipation.
Jason Smith
7
 

STEAM/MAKER Earth Day Program - Pollinators

This collection was specially designed for American Spaces, and it contains a variety of Smithsonian content resources and suggested maker/hands-on activities related to April’s theme of Earth Day. It aims at promoting learning in the fields of science, technology, engineering, arts & design, and math (STEAM) through the application of curated content from the Smithsonian Institution.
Daniela Lyra
23
 

World War II on the Home Front: Civic Responsibility

Lesson based on posters that encouraged American citizens to contribute to the war effort. Students consider the importance of volunteerism in a free society.
Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
4
 

Artful Animals: Leadership

What traits make a good leader? What can we learn about ourselves by looking at our relationship with animals? This student activity explores these questions through animal symbolism in African art, focusing on an embroidered Fante “Cloth of the Great.” Includes multiple objects, short-answer questions, an mp3 of a folktale read aloud, and a creative writing activity.

Tag: Africa

This collection was created to support the 2016 CCSSO Teachers of the Year Day at the Smithsonian.
Deborah Stokes
14
 

Artful Animals: Storytelling and Symbol

This student activity explores African animal symbolism through visual art and folktales. Twelve animals are profiled, including leopards, primates, spiders, chameleons, and the mythical chi wara. Includes objects, an audio folktale ('The Leopard’s Drum’), short answer questions, a creative writing exercise, and opportunities to learn more.

Tag: Africa

This collection was created to support the 2016 CCSSO Teachers of the Year Day at the Smithsonian.
Deborah Stokes
20
 

Tree Banding

Tree banding is one of the activities included in the SHOUT program, a two-year investigation of land and water issues led by Smithsonian scientists. Watch the videos to learn how to band trees and collect data about their growth and why this information matters.
Stephanie Norby
6
 

Objects that Changed the Way We Live

In this collection, we'll explore everyday objects and their impacts on society. Students can begin by reading an illustrated essay from the National Museum of American History highlighting objects that capture several pivotal moments in innovation. Included in this collection are the clock, the iPod, the bicycle and the cellular phone. What other objects have changed the way we lived?
Ashley Naranjo
11
 

Droughts and Dust Bowls

This is a collection of teaching resources about droughts and the Dust Bowl. While it is mainly focused on 20th century American history, there are also some links to articles that cover droughts more broadly across time and cultures. I have included some artists (Woody Guthrie, John Steinbeck, nda Dorothea Lange) who recorded the effects of the Dust Bowl on American society. There is also a selection of lesson plans and videos that explain how farming practices and environmental changes lead to droughts, and how people have responded by changing practices and developing new technologies.

Resources in this collection might be used in Language Arts, Social Studies, or Science classrooms. Questions to consider might include:
-How do people impact their environment?
-How do changes to the environment impact peoples' lives?
-How did government and society respond to the disaster of the Dust Bowl?
-What is government's responsibility in times of natural disaster?
-What steps can be taken to prevent future environmental disasters?

Kate Harris
27
433-456 of 480 Collections