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Found 531 Collections

 

APUSH WWI Propaganda

This student activity includes a variety of types of propaganda related to World War I. The United States government took great action when it came to World War I—they helped organize workers, recruit military members, and regulate the economy so that American could have a successful impact on the war. The Committee of Public Information formed by George Creel and other propaganda-producers used advertising techniques from businesses to make appeals to the average citizen and encourage them to make a difference. This assignment will ask you to connect each piece of propaganda to one of four major goals of the U.S. government during the war and to analyze a few specific pieces for author, audience, purpose, and even the medium/form.

Essential questions include:

  • What are the four main goals of the government during World War I?
  • Why and how did propaganda creators target specific audiences with their messages?
  • What are the effects of changing the medium or form of propaganda on how it might be received?

Tags: World War I, WWI, selective service, draft, liberty bonds, propaganda, music, Uncle Sam, persuasive writing, cause effect

Molly Chester
14
 

WWI Propaganda

This student activity includes a variety of types of propaganda related to World War I. The United States government took great action when it came to World War I—they helped organize workers, recruit military members, and regulate the economy so that American could have a successful impact on the war. The Committee of Public Information formed by George Creel and other propaganda-producers used advertising techniques from businesses to make appeals to the average citizen and encourage them to make a difference. This assignment will ask you to connect each piece of propaganda to one of four major goals of the U.S. government during the war and to analyze a few specific pieces for author, audience, purpose, and even the medium/form.

Essential questions include:

  • What are the four main goals of the government during World War I?
  • Why and how did propaganda creators target specific audiences with their messages?
  • What are the effects of changing the medium or form of propaganda on how it might be received?

Tags: World War I, WWI, selective service, draft, liberty bonds, propaganda, music, Uncle Sam, persuasive writing, cause effect

Lisa Major
32
 

Weikers Family Collection Class Warm-Up

This is a single document with hot spots and questions used to model primary source analysis for a sixth grade class. It is drawn from a collection of archival records and photographs documenting the Weikers family's experience in Nazi Germany and their persistent efforts to seek asylum in the United States. You can find the full collection here:

https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/weikers-family-collection/zGJCDjyWqouEufnb

Questions to consider are:

a. Who are the Weikers?

b. Where did they live?

c. When did they live? What can they tell us about this time in history?

d. How were they affected by Nazi Germany?

e. What did they feel about the Nazis?

Tags: Nazi Germany, Holocaust era, primary sources, Pittsburgh

Kate Harris
2
 

Gettysburg Address

Why was the Gettysburg Address one of the most famous speeches in American history? This Collection contains images that illustrate how President Abraham Lincoln looked during this period in history; information that explains how Lincoln came to be in Gettysburg and images of where he delivered his famous speech; the Nicolay copy of the Gettysburg Address along with a video recitation of the speech; and, an image of the statue that memorializes the event that occurred at Gettysburg National Military Park, PA.
Catlyn Kriston
14
 

WWI Propaganda

This student activity includes a variety of types of propaganda related to World War I. The United States government took great action when it came to World War I—they helped organize workers, recruit military members, and regulate the economy so that American could have a successful impact on the war. The Committee of Public Information formed by George Creel and other propaganda-producers used advertising techniques from businesses to make appeals to the average citizen and encourage them to make a difference. This assignment will ask you to connect each piece of propaganda to one of four major goals of the U.S. government during the war and to analyze a few specific pieces for author, audience, purpose, and even the medium/form.

Essential questions include:

  • What are the four main goals of the government during World War I?
  • Why and how did propaganda creators target specific audiences with their messages?
  • What are the effects of changing the medium or form of propaganda on how it might be received?

Tags: World War I, WWI, selective service, draft, liberty bonds, propaganda, music, Uncle Sam, persuasive writing, cause effect

Edward Elbel
30
 

Smithsonian in Your Classroom: "Lewis and Clark and the Language of Discovery"

Lesson plans in this issue focus on Lewis and Clark as keepers of journals. Click on the PDF icon to download. Please also see an interactive map on the site "Lewis & Clark as Naturalists" from the National Museum of Natural History.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
3
 

Jazz and Blues

This collection will look at how jazz and blues developed from the 1920s, to the Great Depression and beyond.

This lesson pairs well with a literature unit on the Great Depression novel No Promises in the Wind. In this story, a young teenage boy who is an improvisational pianist eventually composes and plays music which comes from his experiences of being homeless.

Students will do a whole group See / Think / Wonder on Lily Furedi's Subway. As the discussion revolves around the variety of people in the scene, they may begin to focus on the musician with the violin case who is the figure of the center of the painting.

The discussion can than transfer tot he music of the times. Students will then listen to each of the pieces in the collection while writing down the mood, tone and images that they see in their mind's eye as they listen. (The chart is included). The class can then discuss themes of hope, desperation, loneliness, etc...

Student can then write their own lyrics to their own blues composition and share with the class.




Yolanda Toni
16
 

Practice Reading Portraits--Black History Month

This collection was created for a brief warm-up activity where students practiced analyzing portraits of recognizable figures as a group, prior to working on their own portrait analysis. Portraits of Muhammad Ali, Serena Williams, Rosa Parks, and Booker T. Washington are included and they vary in detail and medium.

The last resource, a PDF file, is a teacher's guide created by the National Portrait Gallery. Teachers should lead discussion about the portraits using suggested questions in the guide, and then let students search for a portrait of someone of their own choosing to analyze.

tags: civil rights, sports, tennis, boxing, African-American, black history, analysis, comparison

Kate Harris
6
 

Zora Neale Hurston: Author, Anthropologist and Folklore Researcher

This teaching collection includes introductory resources to begin a study of Zora Neale Hurston, as an author, anthropologist and folklore researcher during the Harlem Renaissance.
Ashley Naranjo
11
 

Family Pride

This collection contains resources – photographs, paintings, objects, documents, and more – representing familial ideas and themes that a student could be proud of. This collection is part of an activity for Tween Tribune tied to a student reading of the article For Nearly 150 Years, This One House Told a Novel Story About the African-American Experience. A lesson plan is included in "Notes to Other Users," click on the (i) tab in the upper-right to learn more.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
54
 

#NPGteach The Ladies In and Out of the White House: Not Just A Pretty Face

Looking closely at the women married to our President's. Learn more about the individuals and the contributions they themselves made. Using Learning to Look Strategies to go beyond the pretty faces.

Nancy Gavrish
18
 

The use of objects in teaching language, communications and information exchange.

A collection of education and teaching images that help us assess the value and utility of using real objects when presenting classes that involve language, communication and information exchange skills. #Teachinginquiry

Donald Guadagni
18
 

Taking a Stand: African American Civil Rights Movement

This collection brings together photographs, objects, films, articles and more - pinpoint milestones in the African American Civil Rights Movement. Section topics include: Brown vs. Board; Freedom Rides; the Selma to Montgomery March; and additional figures and events in the African American Civil Rights Movement. Each section is introduced with a standalone text tile that summarizes the resources held within the section.

By no means is this collection comprehensive; instead, it provides a launching point for further research.


Carolyn Hilyard
22
 

Modernism

An exploration of primary sources related to modernism and Hemingway's A Farewell to Arms.

Lisa Koch
39
 

Are student rights protected in school?

This collection explores a number of Supreme Court cases all looking at the rights students have in the American public school system. Students will encounter these court cases through primary and secondary sources, videos, photographs, podcasts, and historical objects. At the end of the lesson, students should be able construct an argument based off the compelling question "Are student rights protected in school?"

Leah Knecht
16
 

Image Analysis: "Girl at Gee's Bend, Alabama" by Arthur Rothstein

Developing an inquiry-based strategy to support students can allow them to investigate objects and images as historians do. In this example, students try to reveal the story behind the image. They raise questions for their own further research. Because the image has only a title, the photographer's name, the "sitter"'s name, the place and the date, students have to rely on their own analysis of evidence in the image, rather than someone else's interpretation. When they read the expert's analysis, they will have already considered many of the elements that the expert highlights and can compare their interpretations.

"Girl at Gee's Bend, Alabama" is a provocative photograph that can be used in discussions ranging from history of the South during the Great Depression, to social justice.

Ashley Naranjo
3
 

Jumping In Lesson

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2016 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute.

The Jumping In lesson helps students to use their creativity in different ways using their five senses (see, hear, touch, taste, and smell). Students will use following sentence starter to help direct students' thinking..

I see, I hear, I touch, I smell, and I taste

The activity can help to exercises their....

Imagination

Creative Writing

Focusing on key details

Asking and answering What, Where, When, When, and How questions

Intro to poetry

Expressive Language

The Jumping In lesson is a great way to start poetry and integrating Social Studies and Science. The activity can be done as a whole group discussion, partner work, or independently.

Maria Menjivar
3
 

The Music in Poetry

Lessons in this issue of Smithsonian in Your Classroom introduce students to the rhythms of poetry. The focus is on two poetic forms that originated as forms of song: the ballad stanza, found throughout British and American literature, and the blues stanzas of Harlem Renaissance poet Langston Hughes. Poetry is put into terms of movement, physical space, and, finally, music.

Click the PDF icon to download the issue. Click on the last two boxes for audio samples of ballads and blues from the Smithsonian Folkways archives.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
8
 

A Shape-Note Singing Lesson

Shape-note singing is a tradition that began in the American South as a simple way to teach the reading of music to congregations. Each note head has a distinctive, easy-to-remember shape. What a great way, then, to introduce the reading of music to children!

In this issue of Smithsonian in Your Classroom, "A Shape-Note Singing Lesson," you'll find a lesson plan and a background essay. Click the PDF icon to see the issue. Click the last box for audio samples of shape-note hymns from the Smithsonian Folkways archives.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
7
 

Native Americans/Tolerance/Kindness

This collection is part of my library's research project for 3rd and 4th grade students. Students will explore the history of various Native American tribes to understand how tribes have been impacted by intolerance. This is my library's way of aligning to the Kindness campaign on my campus.

Erin Kizziar
155
 

How Do Real Historical Resources Help Us Understand Fictional Characters? To Kill a Mockingbird

To explore this "essential question," the resources here offer different contexts for the novel To Kill a Mockingbird. They can help visualize and comprehend the setting of the book and the social issues of the Depression era in the South. With that understanding, students may better apprehend the choices and values of the characters in the novel.

Supporting question: "What was it like to live in small-town Alabama during that time?"

To Kill a Mockingbird is set in the ficticious Maycomb, Alabama, which author Harper Lee modeled on her hometown of Monroeville, Alabama. Students may approach the images from the time period and place of the story (1930s) to consider how race and social class make a difference in how one answers that question.

Supporting question: "What important matters were in the news during that time?"

It's not a fact that Harper Lee based the trial in the novel on the Scottsboro boys, but it may have influenced her. Have students look for similarities and differences. What other events were going on? (e.g., Great Depression).

Have students explain how these resources help understand the characters in the novel.

Michelle Smith
14
 

Exploring American Ideals in Art

How can American ideals be defined and expressed in different ways? The United States of America is associated the ideals of Democracy, Rights, Liberty, Opportunity, and Equality. Those values have served as sources of inspiration for artists as goals that the nation aspires to (even if they are not always achieved). This collection contains artworks inspired by one or more of the ideals listed above. Students should choose a work and identify which ideal it relates to: Democracy, Rights, Liberty, Opportunity, and Equality.

In a short essay based on the artwork, students should answer the following questions:

-How would the student define Democracy, Rights, Liberty, Opportunity, or Equality?

-What is the artist trying to communicate about how this idea plays out in America?

-Does the student agree or disagree with the artist's interpretation?

If desired, students could create their own artwork based on one of the American ideals.

Kate Harris
21
 

Numbers

This collection is an example of how the Learning Lab could be used to create number or alphabet books for younger students. Students can search for the numbers and letters represented in the art, sculpture, and artifacts that exist throughout the Learning Lab.

Alternatively, students could be given a specific theme (animals, for example) and be tasked to find images representing the theme for each letter or number. Annotation (notebook tabs) can be used to include additional text or explanations. Quiz questions could be used to ask "how many ________ are in this image?".

Have fun!

Tags: reading, books, alphabet, numbers, counting, math, young learners, early childhood

Kate Harris
17
433-456 of 531 Collections