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Found 6,338 Collections

 

Weather and Climate (Earth and Space Systems)-- Lesson Plans and Information

What does the weather do to the ocean currents?

Ocean water and currents affect the climate. It takes a greater amount of energy to change the temperature of water than land or air; water warms up and cools off much slower than land or air does. As a result, inland climates are subject to more extreme temperature ranges than coastal climates, which are insulated by nearby water. Over half the heat that reaches the earth from the sun is absorbed by the ocean's surface layer, so surface currents move a lot of heat. Currents that originate near the equator are warm; currents that flow from the poles are cold.

The Great Ocean Conveyor Belt

The great ocean conveyor belt is an example of a density-driven current. These are also called thermohaline currents, because they are forced by differences in temperature or salinity, which affect the density of the water.

The great ocean conveyor belt begins as the coolest of all currents - literally. At the beginning of the conveyor belt:

The Gulf Stream delivers warm, and relatively salty, surface waters north to the Norwegian Sea. There the water gives up its heat to the atmosphere, especially during the frigidly cold winters. The surface waters cool to near freezing temperatures, at which time they become denser than the waters below them and sink. This process continues making cold water so dense that it sinks all the way to the bottom of the ocean.

During this time, the Gulf Stream continues to deliver warm water to the Norwegian Sea on the surface. The water can't very well pile up in the Norwegian Sea, so the deep cold water flows southward. It continues to flow southward, passing the Equator, until it enters the bottom of the Antarctic Circumpolar current. It then drifts around Africa and Australia, until it seeps northward into the bottom of the Pacific.


Jamie Mauldin
10
 

Weather and Climate (Earth and Space Systems)-- Lesson Plans and Information

What does the weather do to the ocean currents?

Ocean water and currents affect the climate. It takes a greater amount of energy to change the temperature of water than land or air; water warms up and cools off much slower than land or air does. As a result, inland climates are subject to more extreme temperature ranges than coastal climates, which are insulated by nearby water. Over half the heat that reaches the earth from the sun is absorbed by the ocean's surface layer, so surface currents move a lot of heat. Currents that originate near the equator are warm; currents that flow from the poles are cold.

The Great Ocean Conveyor Belt

The great ocean conveyor belt is an example of a density-driven current. These are also called thermohaline currents, because they are forced by differences in temperature or salinity, which affect the density of the water.

The great ocean conveyor belt begins as the coolest of all currents - literally. At the beginning of the conveyor belt:

The Gulf Stream delivers warm, and relatively salty, surface waters north to the Norwegian Sea. There the water gives up its heat to the atmosphere, especially during the frigidly cold winters. The surface waters cool to near freezing temperatures, at which time they become denser than the waters below them and sink. This process continues making cold water so dense that it sinks all the way to the bottom of the ocean.

During this time, the Gulf Stream continues to deliver warm water to the Norwegian Sea on the surface. The water can't very well pile up in the Norwegian Sea, so the deep cold water flows southward. It continues to flow southward, passing the Equator, until it enters the bottom of the Antarctic Circumpolar current. It then drifts around Africa and Australia, until it seeps northward into the bottom of the Pacific.


Michele Hubert
10
 

Weather

Students will categorize the sources by the corresponding weather.

Amanda Dashler
17
 

Weapons Used To Colonize America

The era of this collection is before many technological advances had been made. Many weapons used then were handcrafted by the men and used to hunt and prey on animals of the wild. Before other colonies came and began their regimes, the natives would only give weapons after proper training. Before guns there were other materials put together to scare off predators and for various other reasons. When the European countries began to explore westward and colonize different parts of America was also the time weapons began to advance as well. When the European countries came over the did not only bring themselves and their seeds, but also guns which are weapons they did more severe damage and was easier to use than prior weapons like knives and daggers. They used the weapons for food but a time progressed the guns weapons were used less on animals and more for protection against other humans.  For the most part though, the men would hunt for food, usually enough to feed oneself and their family and friends.

Kane Williams
10
 

Weapons Throughout The Ages

This collection represents some of the weapons used during the 1800's and how they were introduced and used. Most of these weapons were used during the Civil War. Many of the guns do have variants. 

The 1800s were a time full of war . Each weapon represented here has a description of what it's use was and where it originated .

The weapons here changed through out the years to fit the need of the people; For example, the Lefaucheux required more rounds since the regular 6 shots could not do the job , and the brass knuckles do more damage then regular punches . 

Marc Morales
10
 

Weapons of World War I

Leah Knecht
13
 

Weapons of War (1600-1800)

Weapons that were used during the 1600 till early 1800 were mostly muskets, rifles, pistols, and swords. Muskets were used by infantry men, rifles by hunters, and pistols and swords by high ranking officers. Muskets were slow and difficult to load. Depending on the man, it took about 30 seconds to load a musket. Experienced shooters could fire 3 shots in a minute. Rifles were even slower, but the accuracy made for the lack of firing rate. Muskets were muzzle loaded, which means that the powder and bullet were poured into the barrel. Rifles and pistols, on the other hand, were flintlocked. That means those guns were ignited by flint and steel. Guns, obviously, were used for long range battles or fights. That leaves us with the melee battles or fights. Swords were used for this type of battle. Most swords were double edged, which means that it could be used on both sides. Those swords that were not double edged were known as sabers.

Bigger weapons that were used in war were pikes and cannons. Pikes were very long spears that could exceed 22 feet. They were not used for throwing, instead, it was used defensively to protect infantry men. The cannon, another defensive weapon, was used to protect troops when preparing to deploy and/or advancing in the field. The cannon could throw 4 to 12 pound cast iron balls that reached 600 to 1800 yards.





Websites Used:

Colonial Williamsburg Online Collection

http://emuseum.history.org/vie...

The Lesson Locker

http://thelessonlocker.com/mat...

Rob Ossian's Pirate's Cove

http://www.thepirateking.com/h...

aagaines.com

http://www.aagaines.com/man/18...

Kevin Baez
12
 

Weapons of the Revolutionary Period

The Revolutionary period was an aggressive and progressive time for the American people. War was very prevalent in this day and age, so as you can imagine, as the war progressed, so did the machinery. America didn’t have many weapons, apart from the muskets that they already had (and arms we stole from the British). Until of course the French played a pivotal role and supported America with weapons to fend off the British, which inevitably led to us winning the war. 

From guns to bayonets, and flask to hold gun powder, etc. War was changing in in this Revolutionary period. Innovations found their feet on the solid land that is America. In the following assemblage, I will be dissecting different types of weapons used in this period.

Adediran Osinloye
10
 

Weapons of the new world

When the colonists arrived in the New World, they were surprised to find that they were the only people in there. While many colonists developed a peaceful relationship with the natives it soon turned into a pseudo war for control over the United States. With native Americans facing the threat of losing their home they used hunting tools as weapons to defend themselves from the colonists. They even started to use the colonists' own weapons  against them. The colonists themselves would also begin to fight each other due to representing different nations. Whatever threats appeared in the New World it quickly turned into an arms race. 

Lance Elliott
10
 

weapons in war

The issue here is that how weapons are used in war and how they impact the world. Since the very first time man has walked the earth we have always had weapons to protect us and hunt. However throughout time we have evolved and made our weapons better and more efficient. Whether it is using iron weapons gunpowder and bullets or dropping atomic bombs on cities weapons always change and become more effective more deadly. Its always been the same when wars happen both sides come up with horrific ideas on how to destroy the other side which results in making discoveries in weapons.

Nevin Cardamone
3
 

Weapons

Looking back in the 1800's and learning the weapons used in battle are very important and to consider the improvement of technology and the way changes were made to improve safety, accuracy, and efficiently. Understanding the way the equipment worked, and how dangerous it could've been for the person with the weapon as well as the person being targeted. Also, how did the nations get in contact with the weapons? Through trade or were they hand made? To be able to compare which nations had the better equipment and was that the reason we that certain nation won, or was it just luck? 

In these 10 slides I will describe the piece from the civil or revolutionary war and its importance to the war and the history behind certain artifacts. 

Brandon Nance
10
 

Weaponry Before 1865

What do the American Revolution and the Civil War have in common? They both required each side to use weapons to defend (or claim) their territory. However, the weapons employed in conflicts before 1865 were very different from those employed today. For example, today, the armed forces rarely used swords in open combat. However, during the American Revolution, swords were a necessity as Donald M. Moran states "During the era of George Washington, a gentlemen would no more leave his quarters without his sword then without his pants!" (Moran). Continuing, Moran explains the prestige associated with swords as "To the civilian it was the symbol of his standing in a highly systemized Society. To a military officer it was an emblem of his rank and often a reward for gallantry, having been presented to him. To the common soldier or sailor it was the weapon of “last resort”" (Moran). These weapons, continued to be used even during the Civil War, as models such as the 1840 Calvery Saber would be issued to members of the Union Calvary (Wikipedia). This continues to show that swords were a prominent part of the army. However, thanks to advancements in other weaponry fields, we no longer need these tools to defend ourselves.

As you look through this collection, ask yourself "What is different between this weapon and its modern counterpart?" This collection will analyze the rifles, sabers and handguns of the late 18th and early 19th centuries and help you experience what it would be like to fight with these weapons. Additionally, we will take a look at important advancements such as Minni Balls and their contribution to the field of weaponry.


Donald M. Moran - George Washington's Swords - http://www.revolutionarywararc...

Wikipedia - List of Weapons in the American Civil War - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...

J Daniel
10
 

Wealth in the America's

Wealth in the America's could be reflected from the shoes that people wear to the house that one may live it. Being wealthy is something many dreamed of and their wealth was measured by what type material of clothing as well as the color and even artwork on anything that they own. Wealth was measured by many things that only a certain amount of people were able to show off.

People were able to become wealthy do to their professional life by making money as a lawyer, judge, or by being a slave owner.

The collection is of what a typical wealthy person would own around the 18th century. 

Shoes

Clothing, such as the dress and the three piece suit

Wigs

Tea sets

Vases

Artwork

and their homes

Jesus Casique
10
 

We the People: Who are We as an American People?

We the People: Who are We as an American People? explores the ways in which artists and sitters use portraiture as a means to convey American history and identity. Students will learn about American geography, culture, civilization, symbols, and the Civil War through the faces of the people who have shaped the United States of America.

#NPGteach

Nicole Vance
96
 

We the People: Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship 2018 Opening Panel Resources

This collection serves as an introduction to the opening panel of the 2018 Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program. This year's theme is “We the People: America’s Grand and Radical Experiment with Democracy.” The title for the opening panel is "The Smithsonian Institution: “A Community of Learning and the Opener of Doors.”

Four Smithsonian staff members will present, including Richard Kurin (SI Distinguished Scholar and Ambassador-at-Large, Office of the Secretary), Jessica Johnson (Digital Engagement Producer, National Museum of African American History and Culture), Lisa Sasaki (Director, Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center), and Chris Wilson (Director, Program in African American Culture, National Museum of American History). Their bios, presentation descriptions, and other resources are included here.


#MCteach

Philippa Rappoport
16
 

We the People: a Deeper Understanding of the Preamble of the U.S. Constitution

This lesson works best for 8th grade U.S. History, after students have learned how the original plan for government (the Articles of Confederation) was failing the newly independent America and how the state delegates met in the summer of 1787 to correct these failings and ended up writing a new Constitution. 

Students start by using the VTS thinking routine to examine Preamble by Mike Wilkins, an engaging and accessible way to 'read' the Preamble of the U.S. Constitution.  

After 'decoding' the words and noticing all the details they can, students use a handout to analyze the language of the actual Preamble and discuss word choice and intended meaning (they might also look at the photo of the actual Constitution at this point to compare the original with Mike WIlkins' work).  

They then read and analyze 4 quotes from The Federalist Papers defending the Constitution to the states who were about to vote to ratify it as a jumping off point to discuss what the Constitution was meant to achieve for the newly formed states.  Discussion about reasons why states would not want to join this union will also add to the understanding of what was at stake for each state. In addition, looking at a graphic organizer showing state and federal powers under this plan for government will help students see how this system divides power between the states and the national government.

Students then return to the original artwork, and decide if analysis of the meaning of the Preamble and the ideals of the Constitution affect how students 'see' the artwork. Using the 'connect/extend/challenge' visual routine, teachers can record what the students connected to, what new ideas pushed their thinking in different directions, and what is still challenging or confusing about the artwork or the Preamble.  

Some possible extension ideas are included in the collection to highlight the differences between the states as well as their similarities/unity, such as creating another artwork using an excerpt from the Declaration of Independence (while adhering to state DMV rules for vanity plates), and  comparing front pages of different states' daily newspapers. #SAAMteach

Aileen Albertson
9
 

We the People

Essential Questions:

What would cause a people to revolt against their government?

Why does a society need a system of government?

Why is it important for Americans to understand their system of government?

Why is it important for Americans to understand the history of their country?

Understanding Moves: Making Connections, Describe What's There, Uncovering Complexity, Reason with Evidence, Build Explanations

Thinking Moves: See Think Wonder, Parts Purposes Complexities

#PZPGH

Gary Galuska
18
 

We are United and We are Never Giving Up

My collection shows powerful images that represents my theme about Being United and Never giving up. I chose these 5 images for my collection because it can show you what the Chicano Movement is about and what Mexican immigrants are going through and what they went through. Without these strong people America probably wouldn't be the same. 

Mariela Flores Ochoa
5
 

Wayne Moeck 1920s and 1930s Artifacts

The purpose of this project is to show our understanding of the 1920s and the 1930s by finding pictures from the 1920s and 30s and writing about why they were important during the time.

wayne moeck
10
 

Wayne Moeck 1920s and 1930s Artifacts

The purpose of this project is to show our understanding of the 1920s and the 1930s by finding pictures from the 1920s and 30s and writing about why they were important during the time.

wayne moeck
10
 

Way of Life in Colonial America

The Colonial Period is very important for the reason that during this period, colonists spent this time forming a better life from their old one, at the same time learning and adapting to the new environment. Children during this period spend most of their childhood learning from their parents, there was not time for school. 

Nonetheless there are numerous innovations and ideas that have evolved and made it into present day society. In my collection of art work there is a mix of a little of everything that ties back to the way of living that took place during the colonial period. Most of these artwork correlate with daily lifestyles and also ways to pass time during the day. 

Hakeem Alfeche
10
 

Waves of Hope: Asian American History in Austin

In this collection, students will learn about Asian American history in Austin. Austin is home to many Asian Americans along with their rich history, culture, and traditions that are preserved and passed on to future generations by their families and communities. This exhibit showcases some of the history that is lesser known but nevertheless important to document and remember. All of the images can be found at the Austin History Center, which houses an Asian American Archival Collection of manuscript collections, photographs, clippings, books, periodicals and other items.

This exhibit was developed by the City of Austin's Asian American Resource Center and the Austin History Center.

Educators and students may use this online exhibit to supplement Texas History lessons and as a supplement to the full exhibit stored at the City of Austin's Asian American Resource Center (AARC). Currently, Waves of Hope is not on display at the AARC. Please contact the site at 512-974-1700 or aarc@austintexas.gov with any questions.

keywords: texas history, asian american,  Texas asians, austin, austin history, austin history center, immigration


#APA2018 #EthnicStudies

#TCSAARC  

Asian American Resource Center Austin, TX
41
 

Watsons Go to Birmingham

Katie Cahill
2
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