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Found 6,091 Collections

 

folkway

music
Andale Dixon
15
 

Smithsonian Learning Lab: Holocaust Art & Memorials

For summer training

#MCteach

Sara Ducey
39
 

Atomic City in the Appalachian Mountains

The Manhattan Project didn't begin in a lab in Los Alamos Nevada - it began in the Appalachian Mountains of Tennessee. President Roosevelt wanted to put an end to WWII, so in December of 1942 he authorized the Manhattan Project. Work on procuring and clearing land for the Oak Ridge Tennessee site was already underway.
By the end of WWII, Oak Ridge was the fifth largest town in Tennessee and the Clinton Engineer Works consumed 1/7th of all the power produced in the nation.
Linda Muller
19
 

President Washington's First Challenge:The Whiskey Rebellion in Western Pennsylvania

The story of the first serious challenge to the new federal government. A focus on economic principles prevalent on the frontier during the formative period of the American government.
Arthur Glaser
20
 

Images

Chris Roddenberry
7
 

Pi (3.14159) and Pie (Yum) Resources from the Smithsonian

Resources for use with #piday
Darren Milligan
14
 

Was Reconstruction a Failure?

The period after the Civil War, known as Reconstruction, had lofty goals for reuniting the nation and preserving the new rights given to African-Americans. For a time, these goals were achieved and three important amendments were made to the Constitution. However, by 1876 Reconstruction was considered over and much of the progress that had been made was undone. This collection of detailed prints and cartoons highlight many different aspects of Reconstruction and asks students to consider the overall result of Reconstruction. Students can analyze each one using the embedded questions.
Kate Harris
8
 

The 1850s and Causes of the Civil War

This collection includes artifacts, stamps, political cartoons, portraits, and videos representing various long-term and short-term causes of the Civil War. Students could use the collection as the basis for a sorting activity:
Which causes are long-term and which are short?
Which represent economic, social, or political differences between the North and South?
Can they be put in chronological order?
Which show attempts at compromise and which show that violence was difficult to avoid?

Additional teaching ideas are listed in the Notes to Other Users section.
Kate Harris
33
 

What do Anthropologists Do?

There are a number of lesson plans devoted to anthropology available from the Smithsonian. This collection links to several of the best lessons and teaching resources and, where necessary, provides short summaries of what each are, so teachers can easily use them in their own classrooms.

It is focused on lessons and resources appropriate for middle and high school classrooms. The last four resources reference the case of Ishi, originally described as "the last Yahi Indian," and an example of flaws in the early approach to anthropology. The Smithsonian housed his brain, which had been donated to science by the University of California, from 1917 to 2000, when it was repatriated to his tribe.
Kate Harris
18
 

Objects that Changed the Way We Live

In this collection, we'll explore everyday objects and their impacts on society. Students can begin by reading an illustrated essay from the National Museum of American History highlighting objects that capture several pivotal moments in innovation. Included in this collection are the clock, the iPod, the bicycle and the cellular phone. What other objects have changed the way we lived?
Ashley Naranjo
11
 

Alexander Gardner's Photographic Sketchbook of the War

This is a collection of photographic plates from Alexander Gardner's Civil War Sketchbook that can be used for teaching about the Civil War in a number of ways. Students can explore the collection and look for images that help them learn about one of the following themes:

1) Technology

2) Military Strategy

3) Life in Military Camps

4) Death and Destruction

5) Photography as Art and Communication

The plates are in order as they appeared in the book, although some have not been included in order to limit the size of the collection. Note that some of the images have additional information linking to external websites with lesson ideas or simply more background on the particular photograph. In addition, be aware that each plate has two images, the first showing the photograph and the second showing Gardner's caption. The three final photos are not from the sketchbook, but show some of Gardner's more famous images and reveal more about the man himself.

WARNING: Some of the images in this collection include pictures of the dead on the battlefield, which some viewers may find disturbing. Please carefully consider whether use of this collection is appropriate for your specific audience.

Kate Harris
40
 

How Did Artists View the Civil War? A Collection using a Visible Thinking Strategy

This collection uses a visible thinking strategy called "See-Think-Wonder" from Harvard's Project Zero to help students analyze a Civil-War era sketch to determine context and perspective. After completing the routine, students will learn more about the image and the artist who made it, as well as view art representing a very different point of view.

For more on this strategy, see the "Notes to Other Users."
Kate Harris
8
 

Zora Neale Hurston: Author, Anthropologist and Folklore Researcher

This teaching collection includes introductory resources to begin a study of Zora Neale Hurston, as an author, anthropologist and folklore researcher during the Harlem Renaissance.

#BecauseOfHerStory

Ashley Naranjo
11
 

STEAM

Science, Technology, Engineering, Art, Mathematics
Robert Ford
0
 

Easter Rabbits, Bunnies, and Hares

So many rabbits, bunnies, hares, and more!
Darren Milligan
70
 

Prohibition

Did the 18th Amendment effectively keep America dry during the 1920s-1930s? What about Prohibition locally in Pittsburgh - was it effective?

This collection of resources includes images, artifacts, texts, newspaper articles, and videos that are assembled to depict a macro-view of how the Prohibition Era started in America. This collection also parallels a local, micro-view examination of Prohibition here in Pittsburgh including a brief history of political corruption, bootlegging, and murder spanning a five year period from 1927 - 1932.
Linda Muller
16
 

From Silk Worms to the Silk Road

This is a collection of resources that could be used to support a lesson on the discovery of silk and the impact of the silk road(s). Artifacts include images of silkworms and the silk-making process, websites with information about the luxuries traded on the Silk Road, and video summary.

Possible guiding questions include:
-Why did silk become such an important commodity in China?
-How did the development of the silk trade routes impact both Europe and Asia?
-In what ways do artifacts from Europe and Asia reveal the cultural connections created by the Silk Road?
Kate Harris
19
 

The Remains at Pompeii

This is a collection of teaching resources that could be used to support a lesson on Pompeii and Mt. Vesuvius as well as life in ancient Rome. Included are artworks picturing Pompeii, archaeological artifacts, and links to "street views" of the ruins as well as magazine articles on the topic.

Some questions to consider are:
-What can we learn about the life of ancient Romans from the ruins at Pompeii?
-What are the strengths and weaknesses of learning from archaeological ruins?
-Why have the ruins at Pompeii continued to fascinate people over time?
Kate Harris
12
 

Civil War Deaths, Pictured and Remembered

Inspired by a reading of The Republic of Suffering: Death and the American Civil War, by Drew Gilpin Faust, this is a collection that shows some of the shocking images the public saw of battlefield death, memorials to the dead, and a lesson plan on the art of memorials.
Michelle Smith
11
 

Smithsonian Video Resources in American Sign Language

This collection includes a growing number of educational video resources in American Sign Language, including the ArtSigns series from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the story behind an unusual object at the National Museum of American History, the Two Inch Universe from the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, as well as a performance from the National Museum of American Indian, and storytelling at the Smithsonian's Folklife Festival.
Ashley Naranjo
39
 

Robber-Baron or Captain of Industry: Andrew Carnegie

This collection includes different perspectives and information about Andrew Carnegie. Students are challenged to build an argument supporting one position or the other: Robber-Baron or Captain of Industry--using the resources as evidence. Was Carnegie an industrialist who desired to get rich and promote himself regardless of the effects on his workers? Or was he an example of the American dream, an industrial leader who improved the nation and helped its people?

Investigate the items in this collection while thinking about those questions. After an initial review of the collection, complete the sorting activities at the end to test your understanding of the issue and begin to develop an argument reflecting your answer to the question above. 

Kate Harris
19
 

From Ancient India to a Studio Near You: Yoga's History

This collection explores yoga's roots in ancient India and how its practice has changed as it has migrated to the West. There are questions embedded throughout the collection, which includes readings, images, links to outside websites, video, and a podcast.

Essential questions ask:

What are the roots of the practice of yoga?

Who claims to have invented it and what were the original goals?

How did it make its way to the western world and how has it changed through that process?

Tags: Hindu, Hinduism, India, religion, exercise

Kate Harris
13
 

Civil Rights Movement in Pittsburgh

This collection contains images, taken by accomplished African-American photographer Teenie Harris. They provide a micro-perspective of the struggle for civil rights in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania during the 1950s and 1960s.
Linda Muller
24
 

The "Wild West"?

The West has always held a special place in American culture. In 1893, Frederick Jackson Turner wrote what is known as the "frontier thesis," arguing that our sense of democracy and hard work has been shaped by experience of survival and growth along the frontier. More than a century later, Americans still idolize the cowboy image and are fascinated by the train robbers, saloons, and violence of the era. How accurate is our mental picture of the "Wild West"? What were the realities of life on the frontier in the late 19th and early 20th century? What was lost and what was gained as America closed out the frontier? Most importantly, why has the West continued to fascinate Americans and play such a prominent role in popular culture?

This learner resource includes images, artifacts, and movies that deal with the concept of the American West.  Students will want to read Turner's essay and answer the attached questions. Then, they will focus on choosing images and ideas to include in a movie trailer or poster advertisement that presents a more accurate image of turn of the century western life.

Kate Harris
29
385-408 of 6,091 Collections