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Found 431 Collections

 

Think Blue: Shells

Esta é uma coleção de recursos do Smithsonian Learning Lab sobre conchas desenvolvida para Think Blue e Virtual Educa 2018. Explorais essa coleção rolando sobre cada imagem para ver o título do recurso e clique em qualquer imagem para ver mais informações sobre o recurso. Para ver outras coleções do Think Blue, visite esta página.

This is a Smithsonian Learning Lab collection of resources about shells developed for Think Blue and Virtual Educa 2018.  Explore this collection by scrolling over each image to see the resource’s title, and click on any image to see more information about the resource.  To view other Think Blue collections, visit this page.

Esta es una colección de recursos del Smithsonian Learning Lab sobre conchas desarrollada para Think Blue y Virtual Educa 2018. Exploráis esta colección desplazándose sobre cada imagen para ver el título del recurso, y haga clic en cualquier imagen para ver más información sobre el recurso. Para ver otras colecciones de Think Blue, visite esta página.

#ThinkBlue

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
36
 

Think Blue: Transportation

Esta é uma coleção de recursos do Smithsonian Learning Lab sobre transporte aquaviário desenvolvida para Think Blue e Virtual Educa 2018. Explorais essa coleção rolando sobre cada imagem para ver o título do recurso e clique em qualquer imagem para ver mais informações sobre o recurso. Para ver outras coleções do Think Blue, visite esta página.

This is a Smithsonian Learning Lab collection of resources about water transportation developed for Think Blue and Virtual Educa 2018.  Explore this collection by scrolling over each image to see the resource’s title, and click on any image to see more information about the resource.  To view other Think Blue collections, visit this page.

Esta es una colección de recursos del Smithsonian Learning Lab sobre transporte acuático desarrollada para Think Blue y Virtual Educa 2018. Exploráis esta colección desplazándose sobre cada imagen para ver el título del recurso, y haga clic en cualquier imagen para ver más información sobre el recurso. Para ver otras colecciones de Think Blue, visite esta página.

#ThinkBlue

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
42
 

Time and Navigation

If you want to know where you are, you need a good clock. For centuries sailors have used clocks to locate where they are out at sea. Today we use synchronized clocks and orbiting satellites for location. In this episode of STEM in 30, we'll take a look at the challenges of navigating at sea, in the sky, and even in space.

August 26, 2015

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
11
 

Tomorrow's Forecast: Oceans and Weather (1995)

This 1995 issue of Art to Zoo includes printable maps and classroom/take-home activities. Students learn how ocean currents influence weather patterns and climate. They conduct an experiment on the differing heat capacities of water and air, and find and label port cities around the globe. Below are some of the port cities represented in artworks from Smithsonian galleries.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
8
 

Triumph and Tragedy: Pittsburgh's History of Innovation in Science

This collection connects the 2019 National History Day theme of "Triumph and Tragedy in History" to a selection of topics related to Western Pennsylvania, science, and innovation. This region’s history features many stories of triumph over tragedy, including two key events: the creation of the polio vaccine at the University of Pittsburgh, and Rachel Carson’s fight against the detrimental effects of pesticides on the environment.

The first half of the collection focuses on the story of the polio vaccine, including context on the polio virus, movements to raise money for a cure, and Salk's work in Pittsburgh. It also mentions Henrietta Lacks, whose cells were used without permission for a range of medical advancements, including the polio vaccine.

The second half of the collection highlights Rachel Carson, her talent for writing and interest in animals as a child, how she came to be interested in the effects of DDT, and her legacy as an environmentalist. 

These objects, images, and sources can be used to help form an idea for a project, provide a new angle on an existing project idea, or lead to new ways of including primary sources into NHD projects. They are drawn from a range of primary source repositories, which can be helpful sources of information for students working on these topics. 

#NHD2019 #NHD 

HeinzHistoryCenterEducation
35
 

Tung Yee Peng Mangrove Forrest

Ani Flandreau i3
4
 

Ultraboost Shoe, 2016-Ongoing

Cooper Hewitt Education Department
9
 

University of Brasilia Photographic Equipment and Production Records/Archival

Photographic equipment as instruments to production of archival information

Cristiane Santos
7
 

University of Brasilia- Brazilian music

Esta coleção está destinada a mostrar um pouco da diversidade musical do Brasil

Adriana Dornellas
25
 

University of Brasilia; Brazilian Flora and Fauna

A collection about Brazilian Nature, mainly Cerrado to use with students from public schools in Taguatinga with Catholic University of Brasilia teachers support.

Nita P.
13
 

Upward Bound Tech & Tour - Intro to the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access' Learning Lab

Taking a great portrait is more than just taking a quick snap of a face. It requires thoughtful contemplation and a variety of choices by the photographer. We'll examine a collection of photographs that illustrate various principles of portrait photography and that will help students to understand the parts of a digital artifact. 

LENS 1 | One lens to consider when looking at an artifact is its context and the impression it gives you. Using "see, think, wonder" strategies, we consider:

  • What do you see?
  • What do you think about it?
  • What makes you say that -- what evidence is there for that - on what are you basing your opinion?
  • What does it make you wonder?
  • Why does something look the way it does or the way it is?


LENS 2 | Analyzing great photographs to provide inspiration for your own photography pursuits 

What makes a strong image?

  • angles (eye-level, high angle, low angle, and bird's eye);
  • light and shadow;
  • framing;
  • shot length (long-shot, medium-shot, close-up, & extreme close-up);
  • mood--capturing a feeling or emotion in a photograph; 
  • scale--how big or small subjects look; and
  • sense of place--capturing the feeling of a place. 

Click into each photo and on the "paper clip" annotation icon to read more information (metadata!)

We will then discuss publishing guidelines and other policies that will help students make their best collections.

Tags: portrait photography, decision-making, self-determination, student empowerment, Project Zero


Tracie Spinale
43
 

Vaccines and History of Science

#Teaching Inquiry

This is my first attempt at a collection to use with my microbiology students

Susan Bender
14
 

Vernon Bailey Naturalist

Collection of information by and about Vernon Orlando Bailey
Siobhan Leachman
9
 

Visionary Concept Tire, 2016-2019

Cooper Hewitt Education Department
4
 

Voyage of Discovery: Lewis & Clark explore Louisiana.

Images related to the Corps of Discovery. Most people think of the Lewis and Clark Expedition as one of geographic exploration. However, President Jefferson charged them to study ethnography, biology, zoology, meteorology, botany and geology. They were required to make detailed maps of their travels and keep a journal about their experiences. Sculptures, paintings and other forms of artwork have been included to illustrate the many interpretations of Lewis and Clark.
Arthur Glaser
38
 

War of Currents

Would alternating current (AC) or direct current (DC) become the dominant power?
This Collection includes images and texts that depict the "War of Currents" that occurred between Thomas Alva Edison and George Westinghouse.
Linda Muller
14
 

Water, Art and Greek Mythology: Achelous and Hercules

A teacher's guide to the painting Achelous and Hercules, by Thomas Hart Benton. This 1947 mural retells an Ancient Greek myth in the context of the American Midwest. Includes the painting, a pdf of the myth "Achelous and Hercules", a supplemental picture guide to the story, a non-fiction article about fresh water from Readworks, and a supplemental worksheet.


Tags: greece, #SAAMTeach , water

Taylor Hummell
6
 

Water-Related Hazards: Flooding

This topical collection includes resources about a water-related hazard, namely flooding. Includes global examples in images and video, including Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates; Al Uqsur, Egypt; Herkimer, NY; Manila; and Venice, Italy. The effects of the Great Flood of 1927 and the US Army Corps of Engineers' response with the Mississippi River are also included.
Ashley Naranjo
11
 

Water-Related Hazards: Hurricanes

This topical collection includes resources about water-related hazards and natural disasters, namely hurricanes. Includes examples from around the world and over time, including Hurricane Ike in Texas and the Greater Antilles, Hurricane Katrina in the Gulf Coast, and Hurricane Sandy in the Northeastern region of the United States. Finally, a lesson plan asking students to design a post-hurricane revitalization plan is included.
Ashley Naranjo
11
 

Water-Related Hazards: Tsunamis

This topical collection includes resources about water-related hazards and natural disasters, namely tsunamis. It includes videos and images of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and the 2011 Japanese tsunami, as well as the 1755 Portugese tsunami that coincided with an earthquake and firestorm all at once.
Ashley Naranjo
6
 

Weather and Climate (Earth and Space Systems)-- Lesson Plans and Information

What does the weather do to the ocean currents?

Ocean water and currents affect the climate. It takes a greater amount of energy to change the temperature of water than land or air; water warms up and cools off much slower than land or air does. As a result, inland climates are subject to more extreme temperature ranges than coastal climates, which are insulated by nearby water. Over half the heat that reaches the earth from the sun is absorbed by the ocean's surface layer, so surface currents move a lot of heat. Currents that originate near the equator are warm; currents that flow from the poles are cold.

The Great Ocean Conveyor Belt

The great ocean conveyor belt is an example of a density-driven current. These are also called thermohaline currents, because they are forced by differences in temperature or salinity, which affect the density of the water.

The great ocean conveyor belt begins as the coolest of all currents - literally. At the beginning of the conveyor belt:

The Gulf Stream delivers warm, and relatively salty, surface waters north to the Norwegian Sea. There the water gives up its heat to the atmosphere, especially during the frigidly cold winters. The surface waters cool to near freezing temperatures, at which time they become denser than the waters below them and sink. This process continues making cold water so dense that it sinks all the way to the bottom of the ocean.

During this time, the Gulf Stream continues to deliver warm water to the Norwegian Sea on the surface. The water can't very well pile up in the Norwegian Sea, so the deep cold water flows southward. It continues to flow southward, passing the Equator, until it enters the bottom of the Antarctic Circumpolar current. It then drifts around Africa and Australia, until it seeps northward into the bottom of the Pacific.


Jamie Mauldin
10
 

Weather and Climate (Earth and Space Systems)-- Lesson Plans and Information

What does the weather do to the ocean currents?

Ocean water and currents affect the climate. It takes a greater amount of energy to change the temperature of water than land or air; water warms up and cools off much slower than land or air does. As a result, inland climates are subject to more extreme temperature ranges than coastal climates, which are insulated by nearby water. Over half the heat that reaches the earth from the sun is absorbed by the ocean's surface layer, so surface currents move a lot of heat. Currents that originate near the equator are warm; currents that flow from the poles are cold.

The Great Ocean Conveyor Belt

The great ocean conveyor belt is an example of a density-driven current. These are also called thermohaline currents, because they are forced by differences in temperature or salinity, which affect the density of the water.

The great ocean conveyor belt begins as the coolest of all currents - literally. At the beginning of the conveyor belt:

The Gulf Stream delivers warm, and relatively salty, surface waters north to the Norwegian Sea. There the water gives up its heat to the atmosphere, especially during the frigidly cold winters. The surface waters cool to near freezing temperatures, at which time they become denser than the waters below them and sink. This process continues making cold water so dense that it sinks all the way to the bottom of the ocean.

During this time, the Gulf Stream continues to deliver warm water to the Norwegian Sea on the surface. The water can't very well pile up in the Norwegian Sea, so the deep cold water flows southward. It continues to flow southward, passing the Equator, until it enters the bottom of the Antarctic Circumpolar current. It then drifts around Africa and Australia, until it seeps northward into the bottom of the Pacific.


Michele Hubert
10
385-408 of 431 Collections