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Found 454 Resources

Nina Simone, 1977

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white photograph of singer Nina Simone performing in Coral Gables, FL. Simone is photographed in profile from the right. She holds a microphone in her right hand and her left hand is extended in front of her. She wears a light colored dress and large dangling earrings.

When I First Sought The Lord / Tell Him You Saw Me

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A 45 rpm record album with the songs “When I First Sought the Lord “and “Tell Him You Saw Me” recorded by Sister Rosetta Tharpe. The vinyl record has a black label at center with white text reading [DECCA] in large block letters at the top center. The album was recorded in Nashville, Tennessee on January 10, 1952.

Color photograph of Eubie Blake and The Reagans

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Color photograph of Eubie Blake, seated in a wheelchair, accompanied by Marion Blake, Eubie's wife and Lew Jacobs. Eubie is shaking hands with then President, Ronald and First Lady, Nancy Reagan. Blake was visiting the White House because on October 9, 1981, he was the recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom, awarded by President Ronald Reagan.

Jazz Hot No. 129

National Museum of African American History and Culture
An issue of the French magazine Jazz Hot from February 1958. The cover has a red background and features a black and white photographic image of Sister Rosetta Tharpe. She is shown in profile from the shoulders up, looking up and away from the camera. She is wearing a dark colored shirt and scarf and guitar shaped earrings. Above the image, at the top left of the magazine is the title [jazz] in large white block letters with [HOT] in smaller white letters against a black bar background. The magazine has 48 pages. An article on sister Rosetta Tharpe is on pages 16 and 17.

Photographic print of W.C. Handy

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black and white photograph of W.C. Handy playing the trumpet in front of a small audience. He stands next to a piano and plays directly into a ribbon microphone mounted on a mic stand. In the background, in what appears to be a round room, are two men and a woman seated in armchairs. The back of the photograph has a barcode sticker, a caption sticker, and a usage sticker.

Jazz Journal Vol. 10, No. 11

National Museum of African American History and Culture
An issue of the Jazz Journal from November 1957. The cover is orange and features a black and white photographic image of Sister Rosetta Tharpe at center. She is standing wearing a dark colored dress with a guitar strapped on her shoulder. Her hands are clenched in fists and are raised to chest height. She is looking up. The title [jazz journal] is printed in large white block letters at the top, followed by issue information and price in orange text against a black background, [NOVEMBER 1957 VOL 10 NO 11 / TWO SHILLINGS]. Beneath the image, in black text against a white background is printed “SISTER ROSETTA THARPE.” The magazine has 36 pages. An article on sister Rosetta Tharpe begins on page 3. The back cover features an advertisement for records.

Tom, The Blind Negro Boy Pianist, Only 10 Years Old

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Engraved sheet music, 5 pages. The front cover's title reads "TOM / The Blind Negro Boy Pianist / Only 10 Years Old" and has an illustration of a boy in dark jacket with white collar and cuffs, standing with his arm on a table. He holds his hat in the other hand.

Photograph of a female dancer in costume performing on stage

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A silver gelatin print depicting a black-and-white image of a female dancer in costume performing on stage. She is depicted in profile, facing a man who is hanging from the trunk of a partially depicted, fake, palm tree on the left side of the image. She is wearing a satiny bikini lined with sequins, elbow length white gloves, and a long feather plume in her hair. Her arms are raised above her head and her body is pushed up against the man’s proper left leg. The man is depicted with his arms wrapped around the trunk of the palm tree. His knees are raised, his feet are off of the ground, and the proper right side of his face is pressed against the tree trunk. He wears an expression of comical fear on his face. He is wearing a light collared shirt, medium toned tie, dark pants, and dark suspenders. In the mid-ground, on the right side of the image, is a man in a medium toned suit and tie, holding a microphone, and looking towards the dancer and the man hanging from the tree trunk. In the background are four bandstands with seated musicians behind them. The block text on each bandstand reads, [JOSE / CURBELO], with a graphic of a grand piano between the first and last names. An inscription in blue ink, written in the center of the image reads, [To my baby LaurE / All my love / (part of it anyway) / [---?]ni]. There are no inscriptions on the back of the photograph.

Letter to Mary Church Terrell from Joseph Douglass

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Letter to Mrs. Terrell from Joseph H. Douglass, grandson of Frederick Douglass, dated May 31, 1911. Single page written on Douglass' personal stationary. Black ink on tan paper. Letter head at the top reads [JOSEPH H. DOUGLASS / Solo Violinist / ENGAGEMENTS ACCEPTED / FOR RECITALS / CONCERTS AND CHURCH / SERVICES / NOW TOURING AMERICA]. Along the left side of the page is a text box containing five quotes from newspapers titled [PRESS COMMENTS]. The handwritten letter reads [1644 Fla. ave N. W. / Wash. D.C. May 31st 1911 / My dear Mrs Terrell: / Replying to your esteemed / favor just received, will say / that it is my pleasure to / accept the invitation to the present / and render a violin selection / on the occasion of the one hun- / dredth anniversary of Harriet / Beecher Stowe. / I thank you for the oppor- / tunity and honor which enables / me to add my little mite / in the celebration of that noble / woman's birth as well as to appear / before such a body of honored women. / I am proud of the fact that / among those mentioned in your / letter, none will be more represen- / tative or distinguished among the / speakers of the meeting than your / honored self. / Yours most sincerely / Joseph H. Douglass / (P.S. / I have carefully / noted the date June 14")]

Photograph of Dizzy Gillespie playing the trumpet in Karachi, Pakistan

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black and white photograph of a group Dizzy Gillespie and seven other men on a stage with instruments. Gillespie is playing a trumpet on the left side of the photograph as the other members of the band look on. At the center of photograph are two music stands one of which reads “RHYTHM / SWINGTETTE,” while the other has R and S in overlapping, decorative lettering. Handwritten in ink near the top left corner of the image is “To, Dizzy - One & only / Here's Looking / at you. Sincerely, / Ray Baldwin / Karachi / Pakistan / 1956.” On the left side of the photograph a man is standing in front of a microphone. He is watching Gillespie play the trumpet. An illegible handwritten signature covers the man’s waist. Written in orange marker at bottom center is “637[illegible].” On the back of the photograph handwritten in orange marker at center right is “#59,” “D12,” and “59e.” Taped to the back of the photograph with masking tape is a white piece of paper with black type. The text on the piece of paper reads “DOUBLEDAY & CO., INC./ 245 PARK AVENUE / NEW YORK, N.Y. / TITLE:” Handwritten in black ink at the bottom of the piece of paper is “to Be or not to Bop-Auto- / biogr. of Dizzy Gillespie.”

Mr. & Mrs. Louis Armstrong pose in front of his Bop City mural

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This black and white photograph depicts Louis Armstrong and his wife Lucille Wilson. They stand in front of a mural of Louis Armstrong, wearing a dark suit and bowtie, playing his trumpet. Louis Armstrong standing in front of his image wears a dark suit with a light colored bowtie. He points with his left thumb at his image. To his left is Lucille Wilson, wearing a dark coat dress, a fur wrap and fur hat. She carries a large black handbag. Over her head on the wall is a sign with text that reads “Cousin/ Jimbo/ for Mayor." On the back of the photograph is a green sticker with handwritten text "#10."

Photographic slide of the Poor People's Campaign

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This image depicts the Reverend Frederick Douglass Kirkpatrick holding a guitar. Wearing a dark blue denim shirt with brass buttons, he is viewed from below, giving him a monumental aspect. He holds the guitar against his torso and strums with his right hand. He gazes straight ahead, over the head of the photographer.The slide mount has text on the reverse that reads "processed by/ rogers color lab corp. / new york."

Bass guitar used by Robert "Kool" Bell of Kool & the Gang

National Museum of African American History and Culture
2015.212a: An electric bass guitar used by Robert “Kool” Bell of Kool and the Gang. The bass guitar is made of light colored wood and has brass tuning pegs. It has two pickups in black. The strings are attached to an oval shaped metal tailpiece with four smaller tuners. The bass also has four volume and tone controls on the left side of the lower front body. Two switches for pick-ups are also on the lower left side of the front body. On the headstock is gold inlay with the bass name running vertically down the center that reads “O / A / S / I / S.” The top of the headstock has an inlaid gold design. Imprinted into the wood on the back of the headstock at the top is “37 57 / USA.” On the back of the body on the lower left side is an oval-shaped black electronics cavity plate. Also on the back at the top near of the neck is a strap button.

2015.212b: Guitar is housed in a guitar case.

Photographic slide of the Poor People's Campaign

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This color slide depicts a large crowd listening to a drummer in front of the Lincoln Memorial. A drummer is seated on a folding chair on a wooden stage set up in front of the Memorial. The drummer, wearing a dark shirt and pants, sits with his back to the viewer. Two large drums are set up in front of him. A drum set is set up on his left. A second individual in a grey shirt and brown pants stands behind the drummer. The audience is sitting and standing on steps in front of the Memorial.

Photographic slide of the Poor People's Campaign

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This photographic slide depicts Dizzy Gillespie standing on a stage with a band. Wearing a navy blue shirt and red pants, he holds his trumpet in his right hand. To his right is a man dressed in a grey suit and tie, seated behind a drum set. Behind him are a group of men, four wearing suit, one in a brown shirt. One of the men is seated and wears a fedora. There is a reflection of the Washington Monument in the water behind the men. The slide mount has text on the reverse that reads "processed by/ rogers color lab corp./ new york."

Gelatin silver print of Paul Monday playing the piano

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black and White photograph of Paul Monday at the piano.

Paul is wearing a light colored suit with buttons on the sleeves. He has curly dark hair. His hands are on the piano keys. The piano is black and reads [CARLETON] on the front. There is a silver microphone to the right side of his face. There is a mirror behind the piano. His back is facing the camera and is face can be seen in the mirror.

Below the image is typed black text on the right side, which reads [PAUL MONDAY, Pianist / PEACOCK RECORDING ARTIST] and the left side, which reads [MANAGEMENT / PEACOCK AGENCY / 4104 LYONS AVE. / HOUSTON, TEXAS]. There are many creases on the photograph. The back of the photograph has several small brown spots and there is text handwritten in graphite on the top left side.

Piano bench from Pilgrim Baptist Church used by Thomas Dorsey

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Wood and vinyl piano bench with the seat as a lid for a storage compartment contained within the bench. Bench seat is covered in a bright orange vinyl material. The bench has four (4) legs that taper down and are capped with metal. The storage compartment inside the bench is divided in half by a small wood rib. The lid of the bench is attached by two (2) hinges on the inside. A small orange paper with a lot number attached to the PL front leg on the outside.

Photograph of Sally Cathrell, Paul Brown, and a group of men and women

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A silver gelatin print depicting a black-and-white image of Sally Cathrell, Paul Brown, and a group of three (3) men and three (3) women seated at two (2) tables covered in gingham tablecloths. Cathrell is depicted on the far left, seated on wooden back chair. She is wearing a black short sleeve blouse, a medium toned skirt and a matching hat with a black bow. Brown is depicted seated in a wooden chair to the right, and slightly in front of Cathrell. He is seated with his back slightly to the viewer and looking over his proper right shoulder. He is wearing a black tuxedo with a white bow tie. Also in the foreground, on the right side of the image is a woman seated in a wooden chair. Her body is turned in profile, towards the left edge of the image, with her face turned towards the viewer. The woman is wearing a long, light colored dress with puffed, elbow-length sleeves and she has flowers tucked into her hair. The man on the far right is depicted wearing a dark toned, double breasted suit, a white collared shirt, and a dark tie. To the right of Cathrell is a woman seated and facing the viewer. She is wearing a medium toned, crochet dress. She is also wearing a light colored, wide brimmed hat, perched on the proper right side of her head. Next to her is a man seated between the two tables. The man is wearing a black tuxedo with tails, white vest, and a white bow tie. There is a boutonniere attached to his proper left lapel and a white pocket square in his proper left breast pocket. The man depicted in the center of the image is wearing a plaid three-piece suit, a white collared shirt, and a medium toned tie. He holds a trumpet in his proper right hand. To his right is a woman wearing a medium toned suit jacket over a black blouse with a pin at the front of the collar. She holds a cigarette in her proper right hand. On the tables in front of them are liquor bottles and glasses. The floor is covered in black and white tiles in a diamond pattern. The photographer's mark, printed in the negative, on the left side of the photograph reads, [H. BAttELLE / N.Y.C.]. There are notations in pencil on the back of the photograph. There are no inscriptions on the front of the photograph.

Festa De João Baptista, Brockton

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white photograph of an outdoor celebration depicting a woman reacting with outstretched hands while facing a man who is playing a drum. Another man, also carrying a drum, stands in a group of people just behind them.

Drum Beats

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This black-and-white photograph depicts a man sitting on the grass playing a traditional African drum. The man is wearing a fedora, dark shirt, jacket, and pants. He is seated with his legs drawn up and the drum held between his knees. Eyes focused on the instrument, he is beating the drum with his bare hands. Behind him is visible the legs and drum of a second man.

Trombone played by Fred Wesley

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A trombone and case, including the mouthpiece, innerslide, and outerslide. The trombone is a Stradivarius Model 36 made by the Vincent Bach Corporation. On the horn, at the top, is an engraving with the model number and manufacturer: [Stradivarius / Model / 36 / Vincent Bach / ELKHART, IN. / USA]. There is a serial number at the bottom on the cylinder where all the tubes converge: [28892].

Photograph of a performance with a band, dancers, and singer

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A silver gelatin print depicting a black-and-white image of a stage performance with a band, dancers, and singer against a large backdrop. The backdrop features several, large caricatured instrumentalists playing brass instruments, stringed instruments, and a woodwind instrument, along a long checkered hallway that has been painted in linear perspective. The band is arranged along the back of the stage, with most members sitting behind individual music stands. Front and center on the stage is a male singer standing at a microphone. He is depicted wearing a light colored suit. Three (3) female dancers, in matching short dress costumes with large bows on their heads, are depicted on each side of the singer. All six (6) of the dancers are posed with their hands held towards the right edge of the image. The dancers’ proper left legs are crossed over their right legs. There are six (6) signatures in blue ink on the front of the image, scattered throughout the lower portion of the image. There are no inscriptions on the back.

King Joe Part I (Joe Louis Blues) / King Joe Part II (Joe Louis Blues)

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A 78 rpm black vinyl record (a) with worn Okeh Records paper sleeve (b). The record has a purple label at the center with gold type. OKeh Logo at the top of the label, with title reading [KING JOE PART I / (Joe Louis Blues) Blues Fox Trot / -Wright-Basie- / PAUL ROBESON with / COUNT BASIE and his ORCH.] on side A, with [KING JOE PART II] on side B. Held in extremely worn Okeh paper sleeve.

Yellow and black leather costume worn by Bootsy Collins

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A yellow and black leather costume worn by Bootsy Collins that consists of a jacket(.1abc), pants (.2), a hat (.3), and a pair of black platform boots (.4ab).
361-384 of 454 Resources