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Found 454 Collections

 

Charles Messier: Comet Ferret

Charles Messier was an eighteenth century astronomer whose specialty was searching for comets. He observed at an observatory atop the Hotel Cluny which was financed by the French Navy.

Arthur Glaser
24
 

Activity Collection: 3D Modeling Bugs!

Go through the character sketches and renders from the animated feature "Bugs!" and guess what personalities the characters portray based on pose, shape, and expression. Then, using scientific illustrations from the National Museum of Natural History as reference, create your very own insect character in the Sculptris software.


This is one of 5 activities used in the Lenovo Week of Service event.

Cody Coltharp
20
 

Quilt Quest

Did you know that quilts are also historical artifacts? Use this collection to learn more about how curators investigate quilts to learn about their origins, and then explore a variety of different quilts that tell us important things about the time in which they were made and the crafters who made them. Finally, make your own quilt depicting an important historical moment.

tags: quilt, craft, activity, review

Kate Harris
19
 

History of Mormons in America

This collection of artifacts, photographs, texts, and historical markers is intended to help students explore the history of the Mormon religion in America.

Each of these items is intended to spark inquiry, following the process below:

  1. Students should choose one artifact on which to focus.
  2. Have them use the artifact analysis PDF (last resource) to begin their study of the artifact.
  3. Next, have students generate questions about the artifact? What do they wonder about? What does it tell them about the Mormon religion or its history within the United States?
  4. Have students complete some general research on their artifact that will help their classmates piece together the story of the Mormon experience.

As a collaborative project, students should use the PBS Forced Migrations map/timeline as a model for a class map/timeline of their own.

  1. Project an image of the map on a class whiteboard or create your own basic outline using large paper.
  2. Have each student present their research findings. The main questions they should answer are: What does it represent about the Mormon experience? Where would the artifact they chose be placed (geographically and in terms of chronology)?
  3. Students should then place place their image on the map with significant dates noted.
  4. After all groups have presented, review the narrative of the Mormon experience with the class. What would they identify as critical moments in Mormon history? What questions do they still have?
Tags: religion, Moroni, Joseph Smith, Brigham Young, Mormon, New York, Utah, Illinois, gold plates, inquiry
Kate Harris
18
 

3rd Grade- Culture

Themes: culture, ethnicity, holidays, celebrations, animal vessels, still life (especially table settings)

Ancient Cultures: Egypt, China, Greece, Rome, Mali

ladyinn
69
 

Carlisle Indian Industrial School

Perhaps the most famous of the Indian boarding schools created in the late 19th century, the Carlisle Indian Industrial School in Pennsylvania was founded by Captain Richard Henry Pratt (with funding and support from the United States government), with the purpose of assimilating (or Americanizing) Indian students.

Student will use archival materials to explore student life at Carlisle Indian School and to evaluate assimilation policy as practiced through the school. What was gained and lost through the process of assimilation?

Using these resources as a starting point, users should research one former Indian student or one aspect of student life using the Carlisle Indian School Digital Resource Center. Many student files record not only experiences that occurred while at the school, but information about occupations and life after the boarding school experience. Were students and families able to shape positive experiences despite the intended consequences of boarding school policy?

Students should create a writing or artwork that reflects information learned about that particular student or activity and that shares the learner's opinions on assimilation policy and the response of Native Americans. How should the Carlisle Indian School be remembered?

Tags: Native American, Indian, boarding school, assimilation, Pratt, Dawes Act, Jim Thorpe, allotment

Kate Harris
32
 

Allensworth

Allensworth, CA. founded in 1908, represents the only all black township in California; founded, built, governed and populated by African Americans. Located in the great central valley (southern San Joaquin), it was founded to be a agricultural community and center of learning. Where, African Americans only 50 years out of slavery could become economically free. Due to lack of a dependable water supply, the untimely death of the Colonel and other factors the town's future was bleak. By 1918 the town began its demise struggling to survive. The historic portions of the town became a state historic park in the 1970's. It is formally listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is a California Historic Landmark.

Steven Ptomey
22
 

Political Cartoons - Imperialism

Collection of Political Cartoons from the late 1800s/early 1900s (Mostly Imperialism)

Wendy Moore
9
 

Immigration

Why do people immigrate to the US today?

Richard Duffy
21
 

Shelley's "Ozymandias" Poem: Museum Objects and Inspired Art

How have museum objects and antiquities inspired arts and literature? Read and listen to a famous poem written two hundred years ago by English author Percy Bysshe Shelley, "Ozymandias." Then, view artworks which in turn were inspired by the poem. View the environmental landscapes and settings in ancient Egypt which inspired the original poem about the colossal sculpture of a famous ruler from over three thousand years ago. The collection concludes with a link to view a draft of the poem. Will Shelley's work inspire the creation of your own poem or artwork about a place you've traveled, or an object you've seen in a museum?

keywords: sonnet, Ancient Egypt, Ramesses II, Thebes, impermanence, cultural patrimony

Tracie Spinale
14
 

Did the Black Panther Party Help or Hurt the Civil Rights Movement?

#TeachingInquiry

1. What did members of the Black Panther Party look like?
2. How did the Black Panther Party help their communities?
3. How was the Black Panther Party viewed by those outside the group?

Richard Duffy
30
 

Creative Questions about the Great Wall

This collection highlights the Creative Questioning thinking routine from Project Zero. Students will watch a video clip about the Great Wall of China and generate questions they have about the topic. Then, they will use the question starters to improve and expand upon their questions. Finally, they will choose one of their questions as the starting point for further research.

tag: Great Wall, China, military, inquiry

Kate Harris
6
 

Charles Russell: Art of the American West

Charles Russell brought the west alive with his paintings and sculptures of western life. His authentic depictions of Native Americans allow the viewer to appreciate the dress and life of the plains Indians. Also skilled in sculpture, Russell depicts cowboys and wildlife in action settings. This lab provides samples of Russell's best work.

Arthur Glaser
17
 

Native American Musical Instruments

Music was an important element in the life of Native Americans. It was created through voice and instruments. The combination of voice and sound was quite elaborate and was created to be used for ceremonies, entertainment, relaxation, and healing. Featured within this collection are musical instruments of several Native American groups. The groups featured are the Cheyenne, Seneca, Hopi, Sioux, and Iroquois. The instruments span from the 18th-20th century. Three different classifications of instruments are featured within the collection. The classifications are idiophones(rattles), Membranophones(drums), and aerophones (flutes) and are organized respectively. The purpose of this collection is to provide a visual comparison of similar instruments among tribes in different geographical regions. The instruments display the similarities in craftsmanship and use of natural material among the various groups. Most of the materials are organic in origin (composed of carbon) and include seeds, wood and animal components. The instruments vary to some degree as far as adornment, but the instruments within their classification serve a similar function and produce a similar sound. As previously mentioned, the music produced by these instruments in combination with voice was intricate. Although the sounds created with the instruments were similar, each of the Native Americans groups created a sound that was unique to their region.

Logan Downs
10
 

Historical Representation of Pocahontas in North America from 1614-2010

Pocahontas is a name well known to many due to her vast representation in everyday culture and society. She is the daughter of the chief of the Powhatan tribe and is well known for her relationship with John Smith and the early settlers of Virginia.This is a collection showing how Pocahontas has been depicted by different people across the time period 0f 1614-2010. These different depictions show how various cultures viewed Native American society and specifically Pocahontas. Through these various depictions one can see how the traditional view of Pocahontas evolved over time. Differences can also be seen in the depiction across different cultures and different mediums. Particularly the contrasting images of Pocahontas in native clothing and Pocahontas in Colonial-style clothing. The representation of Pocahontas is important because she is a crucial figure in the development of early Colonial America, specifically Jamestown in Virgina. Although, her name is known throughout the United States today in connection with John Smith and the Establishment of the Virginian colony of Jamestown.

Kelly Northcraft
10
 

How a Bill becomes a Law

How can ideas become legislation? This student activity reviews the process of how a bill becomes a law. Students may choose from two videos to watch, and then can read through the collection and investigate the resources. They may want to take notes on the process. Finally, a sorting activity assesses whether or not students truly understand the process of creating new legislation in the United States.

Kate Harris
12
 

Responses to Immigration: Then and Now

This collection will prompt thinking about attitudes towards new immigrants throughout our nation's history. What has changed and what has stayed the same?

It is also designed to allow users to explore the range of technical features and content resources available in the Smithsonian Learning Lab.

tags: immigrant, America, assimilate, nativism, stereotypes

Kate Harris
10
 

Should President Truman have dropped the Atomic Bomb(s) on Japan during World War II?

The following pieces in this collection look at the Pacific Theater of World War II and President Truman's decision to use the world's first atomic weapons on Japan. As students work through this collection, they should take their outside knowledge to form an opinion on whether the decision to drop the atomic bombs were justifiable with military necessitiy.

Matthew Stagl
13
 

Human management of natural resources and why it is important.

What resources do humans use in their every day lives? Why do we need to limit and protect the resources that we use, both renewable and nonrenewable? What effects are there when resources are not managed correctly? How are people protecting resources and finding solutions today? #TeachingInquiry

Naomi Warf
17
 

APUSH WWI Propaganda

This student activity includes a variety of types of propaganda related to World War I. The United States government took great action when it came to World War I—they helped organize workers, recruit military members, and regulate the economy so that American could have a successful impact on the war. The Committee of Public Information formed by George Creel and other propaganda-producers used advertising techniques from businesses to make appeals to the average citizen and encourage them to make a difference. This assignment will ask you to connect each piece of propaganda to one of four major goals of the U.S. government during the war and to analyze a few specific pieces for author, audience, purpose, and even the medium/form.

Essential questions include:

  • What are the four main goals of the government during World War I?
  • Why and how did propaganda creators target specific audiences with their messages?
  • What are the effects of changing the medium or form of propaganda on how it might be received?

Tags: World War I, WWI, selective service, draft, liberty bonds, propaganda, music, Uncle Sam, persuasive writing, cause effect

Molly Chester
14
 

WWI Propaganda

This student activity includes a variety of types of propaganda related to World War I. The United States government took great action when it came to World War I—they helped organize workers, recruit military members, and regulate the economy so that American could have a successful impact on the war. The Committee of Public Information formed by George Creel and other propaganda-producers used advertising techniques from businesses to make appeals to the average citizen and encourage them to make a difference. This assignment will ask you to connect each piece of propaganda to one of four major goals of the U.S. government during the war and to analyze a few specific pieces for author, audience, purpose, and even the medium/form.

Essential questions include:

  • What are the four main goals of the government during World War I?
  • Why and how did propaganda creators target specific audiences with their messages?
  • What are the effects of changing the medium or form of propaganda on how it might be received?

Tags: World War I, WWI, selective service, draft, liberty bonds, propaganda, music, Uncle Sam, persuasive writing, cause effect

Lisa Major
32
 

Portraits of James Baldwin

This student activity begins with an analysis of two portraits of James Baldwin by different artists. Then, students are asked to create their own portrait of Baldwin by remixing source material from this collection. Student portraits should answer the following questions:

1. How do you think James Baldwin should be remembered?

2. What are Baldwin's contributions to American life and culture?

Students may need to do additional research on Baldwin and his life in order to complete this assessment. This is an opportunity for students to learn about and explore the life of a revolutionary writer who presents a unique view of the civil rights movement and status of African-Americans in the United States.

Kate Harris
25
 

WWI Propaganda

This student activity includes a variety of types of propaganda related to World War I. The United States government took great action when it came to World War I—they helped organize workers, recruit military members, and regulate the economy so that American could have a successful impact on the war. The Committee of Public Information formed by George Creel and other propaganda-producers used advertising techniques from businesses to make appeals to the average citizen and encourage them to make a difference. This assignment will ask you to connect each piece of propaganda to one of four major goals of the U.S. government during the war and to analyze a few specific pieces for author, audience, purpose, and even the medium/form.

Essential questions include:

  • What are the four main goals of the government during World War I?
  • Why and how did propaganda creators target specific audiences with their messages?
  • What are the effects of changing the medium or form of propaganda on how it might be received?

Tags: World War I, WWI, selective service, draft, liberty bonds, propaganda, music, Uncle Sam, persuasive writing, cause effect

Edward Elbel
30
 

What's in a name?

This collection is based on a lesson in Bruce Lesh's "Why Won't You Just Tell Us the Answer?" and on a Smithsonian National Museum of American History lesson (both cited fully below). In this lesson, students will evaluate primary source material in order to develop an appropriate name for the site of the 1876 battle at Little Bighorn River. This collection allows students to explore the following questions:

  • Why do different interpretations of history develop? How do they change over time?
  • When thinking about conflicts in history, whose perspectives are valued and remembered?

tags: Custer, Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse, Little Big Horn, continuity, change over time, perspective, historiography, point of view, Native American, indigenous, American Indian, Sioux, Greasy Grass

Kate Harris
18
361-384 of 454 Collections