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Found 480 Collections

 

The Hero's Journey in Greek Mythology

This is an example of how to build teacher-made materials into a scripted curriculum. My school uses the curriculum, EngageNY, to teach middle school English language arts. In 6th grade, the students read The Lightning Thief by Rick Riordan to study the genre of mythology, elements of mythology and theme, allusion, and the archetype of The Hero's Journey. 

Resources created are shared through a living Google Doc in order to make it easier to make a copy and change to fit the needs of individual teachers and students. #SAAMteach

Faith Mariel Bejar
9
 

Flashcard Activity: See, Think, Wonder with Science-Related Images

This collection contains illustrations, sketches, paintings, sculpture and photographs representing a variety of science-related concepts, including animal adaptations, the invention process and climate change. 

They may be used for a variety of purposes; here, we use them as a catalyst for discussion.  In small groups or as a classroom, have students select one artwork they find meaningful or interesting and discuss the following:

  1. Why did you pick this image?  
  2. What do you see?  Name specific aspects of the image you notice.
  3. What do you think about what you see?
  4. What does this image make you wonder? 

This activity works equally well online or using printed flashcards (see the resource tile).  You may also replace or pair the above activity with a Project Zero Thinking Routine found in the final section of the collection. 

Keywords: printable, flash card, project zero visible thinking routine, New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association, NJPSA, arts integration, natural history, animals, invention, patent, portraits, weather

Ashley Naranjo
47
 

I've Fallen, and I Can't Get Up

This collection deals with individuals who were ordinary, rose to greatness, and then his/her life was reduced to less than ordinary. This collection will be used with the focus novel, Flowers for Algernon, as well as short stories, poems, and non fiction texts. The initial theme of the unit is FEAR and how we deal with it. These individuals were without fear or possessed the ability to mute that fear even though it cost all of them in the end.  This unit will be used to compare the character arc of Charley from the book to their choice of artwork and the subject's journey. This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2018 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute. #NPGteach

Lisa Byrd
27
 

Ideas to Solutions with Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

How do you help students test their ideas in your classroom? A critical step in the design process, prototyping and testing ideas helps problem-solvers learn from failures, experiment with materials, and visualize their solutions. Educators will dive into a case study from Michael Graves Architecture and Design and explore various techniques to experiment with ideas in the classroom with resources from professional designers and Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum.

#NTOY18 #CHEDUCATION #CHDESIGNTHINKING

#designthinking

Cooper Hewitt Education Department
43
 

Emotions: Expression

Ability to comprehend and express emotions via color -- journeys from the initial discovery and acceptance of multiple emotions to a various selection of emotions itself. People make conscious choices in the creation of art; colors can correlate to emotions and designers make these choices purposely. 

#designthinking


Cooper Hewitt Design Scholars
18
 

Fonts and Feelings - Ai Hashimoto

There's a lot you can get out of font design, one of those is feelings. As a reflection on the various design concepts I have explored at Cooper Hewitt with the Design Scholars, I created a Learning Lab on how the fonts in our everyday lives are connected to the feelings that we portray in our writing. I have pulled resources from designers I have met throughout the DesignPrep Program, including designs from Cooper Hewitt, the Smithsonian, and myself. Below you will see a collection of 10 images (each with a description on the connection to feelings) including a video "Wicked Problems in Type Design" that you can explore.

 ***The descriptions written by me may not depict what the actual designer intended their audience to feel, but they are my interpretation (except for my 2 pieces), so please feel free to build off of or have your own interpretation 

#designthinking

Cooper Hewitt Design Scholars
11
 

Liberty Bonds of World War I (WW1)

This collection presents three different liberty bonds primary sources dating from 1918: a postcard, sheet music/song, and a celebrity aviator's brochure. With these resources students will explore Liberty Bonds, also called war bonds or liberty loans, which were essentially loans from the American people to the U.S. government to fund the Allies' involvement in World War I. Many public campaigns presented purchasing bonds as the patriotic way to support the war from the home front. Carefully chosen words and imagery conveyed this message and persuaded Americans to act quickly, through both subtle and direct messaging. 

Essential questions: What role did Liberty Bonds play in financing the U.S. WWI effort? How did persuasive language techniques and visuals lead many Americans to see Liberty Bonds as part of their patriotic duty on the home front? 

Keywords: primary source, secondary source, soldiers, World War I, Great War, Ruth Law, "What are you going to do to help the boys?", army, military, Uncle Sam, WWI, persuasion, advertising

This collection was created in conjunction with the National Postal Museum's "My Fellow Soldiers: Letters from World War I" teacher workshop (July 19, 2017). It focuses on one of the many postcards from this topical collection to demonstrate its use in the secondary classroom. #NPMTeacherPrograms

#historicalthinking


Ashley Naranjo
6
 

Japanese Internment through Art and Documents

These resources can be used in an activity that introduces a lesson on Japanese-American Internment during World War II.

1. To begin, show students Roger Shimomura's painting entitled Diary: December 12, 1941. Without providing any background information, use the "Claim, Support, Question" routine to have students make claims about what they think is going on in the artwork, identify visual support for their claims, and share the questions they have about the painting. Document responses in three columns on large chart paper or a whiteboard.

2. Following this initial conversation, share the title, artist's name, and date of the painting. Ask students to consider the date in the title, and discuss what significance this date might have. If they don't figure out that this date was five days after the Japanese bombing of Pearl Harbor, share that information. Share with students that this painting is part of a series Roger Shimomura created based on the wartime diary entries of his grandmother, Toku, who was born in Japan and immigrated to Seattle, Washington in 1912. Along with thousands of other people of Japanese ancestry living on the West Coast during World War II , Toku and her family were forcibly relocated to an internment camp after the attack on Pearl Harbor. Roger was a young boy during World War II, and remembers spending his third birthday in the Puyallup Assembly Center on the Washington state fairgrounds, where his family was sent before being transferred to Minidoka Reservation in Idaho for the duration of the war.

3. Jigsaw Activity, Pt. 1. After sharing this context, tell students they will each be receiving a primary source document that relates to the painting in some way. Distribute copies of "Woman at Writing Table," the Superman comic, the Instructions to All Persons of Japanese Ancestry, and Toku Shimomura's diary entries. Divide students into four groups, one per document. Give students time to analyze their document as a group and discuss how it affects their interpretation of the painting.

4. Jigsaw Activity, Pt. 2. Next, create new groups so that each group includes students who received each of the four sources. Ask students to briefly report on their document and what their original group discussed as its possible meaning and relation to Roger Shimomura's painting.

5. Return to the painting as a large group, and discuss how the primary source documents have influenced students' reading of the artwork.

6. Optional additional resource: If time allows, have students watch excerpts from Roger Shimomura's artist talk at the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

#APA2018

#visiblethinking

Phoebe Hillemann
8
 

Multi-cultural Voices: Examining Culture and Identity

 Amy Heishman

The Madeira School, Mclean, VA

11th grade, Native American and Asian American Voices

Lesson Time: 60 minutes

 

Resources:

            “Electronic Highway” by Nam June Paik

            “I Hate Tonto (Still Do)” by Sherman Alexie

            Excerpts from Tommy Orange's  There, There 

           “Diary: December 12, 1941” by Roger Shimomura (optional)

           Vocabulary List for Alexie and Paik

Lesson Objectives:

  • Demonstrate the collective understanding of cultural identity and its role in different media.
  • Introduce the novel There, There by Tommy Orange as well as Woman Warrior by Maxine Kingston.
  • Understand the role of allusion and metaphor in a work of literature.
  • Develop a multi-dimensional, complex understanding of identity in relation to the individual and society.

Lesson Rationale:

            By including Paik’s “Electronic Highway” and Shimomura’s “Diary: December 12, 1941”, students will preview lesson concepts for There, There and Woman Warrior.  These art works also work as introductory pieces for other multicultural texts that explore identity and place; both works conceptualize the idea of national, state, and individual identities and the complex relationship among those intersections.  Moreover, the thinking routine, “Connect, Extend, Challenge,” allows students to examine art in relation to their own identity.  This particular routine invites personal anecdote and cultural connections; the responses to “Challenge” may help students conceptualize the theme of either unit novel.

Procedure:

  • Project “Electonic Superhighway” by Nam June Paik using the Smithsonian Learning Lab Collection, “Multicultural Voices.”  Direct students to examine the piece for at least one minute, writing down any thoughts or reactions they might have.
  • Begin thinking routine, “Connect/Extend/Challenge.”  [1]  Encourage students to examine and discuss the piece in relation to identity or cultural knowledge.
  • Have students read the quote from There, There  and respond.  The teacher should connect the quote to Nam June Paik’s piece.
    • Guiding Questions: how might you connect the artwork to the quote?  What might they agree on? How might they differ?
  • Have students read and define the vocabulary for Alexie and Paik.  
  • Read and annotate the poem, “I Hate Tonto (Still Do)” by Sherman Alexie. 
    • Guiding vocabulary: culture, heritage, identity.
  • Discuss the poem using the essential question(s) below.
    • How is identity associated with culture and/or heritage?
    • What are some ways that mainstream culture celebrates or oppresses certain kinds of identity?
    • What does it mean to be multi-cultural?  Can individuals claim multiple cultural identities?  If so, how?
    • How is identity connected to geographical location? To stereotype? To history?
  • Return to Paik's work.  Ask students to make connections between Paik and Alexie. 
  • Introduce novel as an exploration of identity in memoir form.

NCTE Standards:

  • 1.Students read a wide range of print and non-print texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new information; to respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for personal fulfillment. Among these texts are fiction and nonfiction, classic and contemporary works.
  • 6. Students apply knowledge of language structure, language conventions (e.g., spelling and punctuation), media techniques, figurative language, and genre to create, critique, and discuss print and nonprint texts.
  • 11. Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative, and critical members of a variety of literacy communities.
  1. 12. Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).

 #SAAMteach

 

[1] See quiz attached to “Electronic Superhighway” in the collection.

 

Amy Heishman
8
 

The Preamble to the Constitution of the United States

The Preamble to the Constitution of the United States is a collection of resources for educators to refer to when introducing  the Constitution of the United States with a specific emphasis on the preamble. Mike Wilkins Preamble is used as a featured piece of artwork to give students an initial introduction to the text of the primary source document. #SAAMteach

Laurence Denizard
7
 

Alphabet Soup: Rural America and the New Deal

This lesson explores three different New Deal programs, with a specific eye towards their impact on rural America. As well, it focuses on student engagement with a variety of types of primary sources.  This lesson is designed as a self-contained class activity, which requires no supplementary teaching beyond the MoMS exhibition Crossroads. It is designed to be done in class following a visit to that exhibition, or within an after-school setting following a similar visit.

Age Levels Intermediate (9 to 12 years old), Middle School (12 to 15 years old)


Why are primary sources important?

  1. Direct engagement with artifacts and records of the past encourages deeper content exploration, active analysis, and thoughtful response.
  2. Analysis of primary sources helps develop critical thinking skills by examining meaning, context, bias, purpose, point of view, etc.
  3.  Primary source analysis fosters learner-led inquiry as students construct knowledge by interacting with a variety of sources that represent different accounts of the past.
  4. Students realize that history exists through interpretation that reflects the view points and biases of those doing the interpreting. 

This lesson aims to:

  • Introduce students to New Deal programs that affected rural life and agriculture during the Great Depression.
  • Encourage discussion of the experience of those programs in the context of the Museum on Main Street (MoMS) exhibition Crossroads.
  • Help students practice using different types of sources as research material.

Students should be able to:

  • Identify different types of sources as primary and secondary sources, as well as differentiate between objective and subjective sources.
  • Interrogate textual, video, and visual sources to build a picture of how different programs affected ordinary people.
  • Be able to translate their research into a presentation, and teach it to other students.

See notes for lesson plan instructions.

Mary Byrne
21
 

Cultivating Communication: Famous Gardeners & Garden-Lovers

Featuring postage stamps from the National Postal Museum's collection, Cultivating Communication: Famous Gardeners was created in conjunction with Smithsonian Gardens. Each stamp relates to either a historic or fictional famous gardener, or garden-lover. Teacher participants in the professional development seminar, "Cultivating Communication" (July 10, 2018) were encouraged to use this collection as a launching pad for a classroom activity related to the Smithsonian Gardens' program, Community of Gardens. #NPMteacherprograms 

Keywords: gardener, garden, garden-lover, nature-lover, naturalist, botany, botanist, horticulture, landscape architect, outdoor adventurer, wilderness explorer, national parks, environmentalist, American artist, American author, American poet, children's literature, pop culture, Hollywood icon, American president, First Lady.

National Postal Museum
34
 

How has our view of Thomas Jefferson changed over time?

Thomas Jefferson is remembered for his contributions to the ideals of natural rights and democratic principles.  Yet, as a slave owner,  Jefferson personally lived in contradiction of those  principles. In this Learning Lab you'll explore how Thomas Jefferson is viewed at different times in history through portraiture. Using evidence from his portraits you'll answer the question, "How has our view of Thomas Jefferson changed over time."

Dave Klippel
3
 

World War 2: Frankiln Roosevelt and Yalta

This activity will be an opener for our Module on World War 2: Franklin Roosevelt and Yalta. Students will analyze a portrait using the 'puzzle activity' strategy to observe, describe, create questions and piece together the portrait. After the original portrait is revealed students will read informational text about the artist and portrait and answer the questions they generated during their activity. We will also be looking at Winston Churchill's portrait by the same artist. 

Karmalita (Rose) Williams
4
 

Columbus

Columbus as explorer. Contains activity for focusing on and finding details that tell a story, a formative assessment using a portrait, and a summative assessment for the end of unit.

NPGTEACH 

Lisa Lynch
5
 

"Home and Away": Using museum objects to prompt stories and explore sense of place and belonging

"Home and Away" is a digital storytelling workshop that enhances the 4Cs (Creativity, Critical thinking, Collaboration, Communication) and improves literacy in second-language learners.  In this three-day workshop participants from Spain coming to Washington DC for an international exchange program with Oyster-Adams Bilingual School, supported by American students, will use museum objects as prompts to create videos of personal stories. No technical experience is necessary, but participants of all levels will:

  • learn about the variety of resources available in the Smithsonian Learning Lab.
  • experiment with storyboarding techniques for creative writing.
  • learn how to record and edit an audio file.
  • be supported in the selection of images and the production of a short video.
  • reflect on the Digital Storytelling 5-steps process
  • practice oral and written English language skills
  • enhance identity through personal stories
  • increase visual literacy through close looking at art

This workshop has been organised by the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access (SCLDA) in collaboration with Oyster-Adams Bilingual School.

Workshop facilitators are Antonia Liguori (Loughborough University, UK) and Philippa Rappoport (SCLDA).

This activity is part of  “Storying” the Cultural Heritage: Digital Storytelling as a tool to enhance the 4Cs in formal and informal learning, a research project led by Dr Antonia Liguori, appointed as a Smithsonian Fellow with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access (SCLDA) from March 1 to June 30 2018, and is funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council UK under the International Placement Scheme.

Antonia Liguori
18
 

"Pertenecer": Using Museum Objects to Prompt Stories and Explore Sense of Place and Belonging

Pertenecer is a digital storytelling workshop that enhances the 4Cs (Creativity, Critical thinking, Collaboration, Communication) and improves digital literacy.  In this three-day workshop participants attending Fairfax County Public School Family Literacy and/or the Parent Leadership programs will use museum objects as prompts to create videos of personal stories. No technical experience is necessary, but participants of all levels will:

  • learn about the variety of resources available in the Smithsonian Learning Lab.
  • experiment with story-boarding techniques for creative writing.
  • learn how to record and edit an audio file.
  • be supported in the selection of images and the production of a short video.
  • reflect on the Digital Storytelling 5-steps process
  • practice oral and written English language skills
  • enhance identity through personal stories
  • strengthen intergenerational family bond
  • increase visual literacy through close looking at art

_______________________________________________________________

This workshop is part of the research project "Storying the Cultural Heritage: Digital Storytelling as a tool to enhance the 4Cs in formal and informal learning" led by Dr Antonia Liguori, appointed as a Smithsonian Fellow with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access (SCLDA) from March 1 to June 30 2018, and is funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council UK under the International Placement Scheme. Over the next months, Dr Antonia Liguori, in collaboration with Dr Philippa Rappoportwho has agreed to serve as principal mentor/advisor during Dr Liguori’s appointment – will work with Fairfax County Public School Family Literacy and Parent Leadership Programs to explore the use of Digital Storytelling in combination with the digital resources of the Smithsonian Learning Lab. 

Antonia Liguori
35
 

Cambodian New Year

Cambodian New Year (Khmer: បុណ្យចូលឆ្នាំថ្មី) or Choul Chnam Thmey in the Khmer language, literally "Enter New Year", is the name of the Cambodian holiday that celebrates the traditional Lunar New Year. The holiday lasts for three days beginning on NewYear's Day, which usually falls on April 13th or 14th, which is the end of the harvesting season, when farmers enjoy the fruits of their labor before the rainy season begins.

Cambodians also use Buddhist Era to count the year based on the Buddhist calendar.
    Maha Sangkran, derived from Sanskrit Maha Sangkranta, is the name of the first day of the new year celebration. It is the end of the year and the beginning of a new one. People dress up and light candles and burn incense sticks at shrines, where the members of each family pay homage to offer thanks for the Buddha's teachings by bowing, kneeling and prostrating themselves three times before his image. For good luck, people wash their face with holy water in the morning, their chests at noon, and their feet in the evening before they go to bed.

    Vireak Vanabat is the name of the second day of the new year celebration. People contribute charity to the less fortunate by helping the poor, servants, homeless, and low-income families. Families attend a dedication ceremony to their ancestors at monasteries.

    T'ngai Loeng Sak in Khmer is the name of the third day of the new year celebration. Buddhists wash the Buddha statues and their elders with perfumed water. Bathing the Buddha images is a symbolic practice to wash bad actions away like water clean dirt from household items. It is also thought to be a kind deed that will bring longevity, good luck, happiness and prosperity in life. By washing their grandparents and parents, the children can obtain from them best wishes and good pieces of advice to live the life for the rest of the year.

#APA2018  #TCSLowell

Siobhan Melville
38
 

Who Belongs in Massachusetts? The Story of Immigration

This collection is to support our 4th grade unit on immigration. 

Our unit makes use of the Massachusetts Department of Education's lesson "America's Salad: The Story of Immigration to Massachusetts" and includes trips to the Tsongas Industrial History Center in Lowell for their program "Yankees and Immigrants" and to the Edward Kennedy Institute for the American Senate for their program "Pathways to Citizenship"

In class, we will explore why people leave their country, where they choose to settle (with a particular focus on Lowell, Massachusetts), and how they are welcomed. Students will explore how

#tcslowell

#APA2018

#immigration #Massachusetts

Laura Lamarre Anderson
28
 

iSpy: Storytelling in Presidential Portaiture

iSpy: Storytelling in Presidential Portraiture 

 

Objective: Students will explore how elements of a portrait tell the story of the subject’s identity by comparing portraits of Presidents Washington and Obama.

 

Procedure:

  1. Instruct students to look carefully at each portrait. They should read through the information for each portrait; follow the highlight instructions; and answer the quiz questions.
  2. Lead a discussion about the symbols included each portrait. What story is the artist trying to tell? What do they leave out? How does an artist contribute to our understanding of Washington and Obama’s identity? How does art help to shape our historical understanding of their subjects?
  3. Have students create a self-portrait and write an artist’s introduction explaining how they intentionally included/excluded/highlighted symbols to tell their story of identity. If making art isn’t possible, have students write a description of what their portrait would look like.

 

 

 

For more information and context:

http://www.georgewashington.si...

https://www.newyorker.com/cult...

 #NPGteach

Christy Ting
3
 

Movement of Life Initiative: Discover What Makes Sharks Move

Our knowledge about animal movement and the processes that regulate it only begins to scratch the surface! Join the Smithsonian's Movement of Life (MoL) Initiative in their mission to advance the understanding of how all living things, big and small, move across land and seascapes to better sustain a biodiverse planet. This is the first of the MoL collections focused on discovering shark movement along the Atlantic Coast of the United States. What makes sharks move? Dive in to find out!

**Lesson plan included (with teacher strategies) that follows NGSS for 4th graders where students are the scientists, they map and analyze shark movement!

Contact Smithsonian scientist Dr. Matt Ogburn at ogburnm@si.edu for inquiries about the shark tagging project or visit his lab's website for more information! 

Cosette Larash
51
 

Activity Collection: ArtBots!

In this activity collection, you'll learn how to create your very own art-making robot--an ArtBot! 



Special thanks to Lenovo

Cody Coltharp
23
 

Impressionism

Impressionism, an art movement that began in France and was most prevalent from approximately 1872-1892, was an innovative and important precursor to several different art styles. It focused on capturing everyday scenes, changing light, and moments of motion. Forerunners of this movement include artists such as Édouard Manet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Claude Monet, and Edgar Degas.

Characteristics of Impressionism include quick and non-blended brush strokes, occasional unmixed colors, and an overall appearance of the "impression" of a situation-- not necessarily a fully rendered, academic image.

[All images in this collection have been personally uploaded from and credited to Wikimedia Commons.]

Alexander Falone
42
 

Education 131 Final Project - Recycling

Here is a collection of works and resources that demonstrate examples of the beginnings of Recycling, as well as the various ways in which this practice is being utilized today.

Ivan Murillo
5
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