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A teacher at work in a school sponsored by the Gécamines, a state-owned mining company, Kolwezi, Congo (Democratic Republic), [slide]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.

This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for National Geographic and traveled to Africa from January 19, 1972 to mid April 1972.

A teacher at work in a school sponsored by the Gécamines, a state-owned mining company, Kolwezi, Congo (Democratic Republic), [slide]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.

This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for National Geographic and traveled to Africa from January 19, 1972 to mid April 1972.

A teacher at work in a school sponsored by the Gécamines, a state-owned mining company, Kolwezi, Congo (Democratic Republic), [slide]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.

This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for National Geographic and traveled to Africa from January 19, 1972 to mid April 1972.

A teacher at work in a school sponsored by the Gécamines, a state-owned mining company, Kolwezi, Congo (Democratic Republic), [slide]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.

This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for National Geographic and traveled to Africa from January 19, 1972 to mid April 1972.

A teacher at work in a school sponsored by the Gécamines, a state-owned mining company, Kolwezi, Congo (Democratic Republic), [slide]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.

This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for National Geographic and traveled to Africa from January 19, 1972 to mid April 1972.

A teacher at work in a school sponsored by the Gécamines, a state-owned mining company, Kolwezi, Congo (Democratic Republic), [slide]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.

This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for National Geographic and traveled to Africa from January 19, 1972 to mid April 1972.

A teacher at work in a school sponsored by the Gécamines, a state-owned mining company, Kolwezi, Congo (Democratic Republic), [slide]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.

This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for National Geographic and traveled to Africa from January 19, 1972 to mid April 1972.

A teacher at work in a school sponsored by the Gécamines, a state-owned mining company, Kolwezi, Congo (Democratic Republic), [slide]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.

This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for National Geographic and traveled to Africa from January 19, 1972 to mid April 1972.

A teacher at work in a school sponsored by the Gécamines, a state-owned mining company, Kolwezi, Congo (Democratic Republic), [slide]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.

This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for National Geographic and traveled to Africa from January 19, 1972 to mid April 1972.

A teacher at work in a school sponsored by the Gécamines, a state-owned mining company, Kolwezi, Congo (Democratic Republic), [slide]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.

This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for National Geographic and traveled to Africa from January 19, 1972 to mid April 1972.

A teacher at work in a school sponsored by the Gécamines, a state-owned mining company, Kolwezi, Congo (Democratic Republic), [slide]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.

This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for National Geographic and traveled to Africa from January 19, 1972 to mid April 1972.

A teacher at work in a school sponsored by the Gécamines, a state-owned mining company, Kolwezi, Congo (Democratic Republic), [slide]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.

This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for National Geographic and traveled to Africa from January 19, 1972 to mid April 1972.

A teacher at work in a school sponsored by the Gécamines, a state-owned mining company, Kolwezi, Congo (Democratic Republic), [slide]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.

This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for National Geographic and traveled to Africa from January 19, 1972 to mid April 1972.

A teacher at work in a school sponsored by the Gécamines, a state-owned mining company, Kolwezi, Congo (Democratic Republic), [slide]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.

This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for National Geographic and traveled to Africa from January 19, 1972 to mid April 1972.

A place at the park: LGBTQ+ inclusion and skateboarding

National Museum of American History

When you think about the culture around skateboarding, you might think about the laid-back vibe of acceptance and inclusion that the sport has come to foster. But skaters from the LGBTQ+ community haven’t always felt accepted and included. Violent anti-gay attacks in the early 1980s and 1990s within the male-dominated world of skate led many to hide their sexuality. Brian Anderson, a skater who rose to popularity in the 1990s, remembers regularly hearing gay slurs, which made him think at a young age that it was dangerous to talk about his sexuality.

Recently, however, skate has made great strides in its acceptance of LGBTQ+ skaters. To document this shift, the museum has collected from members of this diverse and fiercely dedicated community.

Brian Anderson

A black skateboard with a red logoThis skate deck was one of Brian Anderson’s first pro model decks issued when he skated for Toy Machine in the mid-1990s. Anderson would go on to skate for Girl Skateboards and found his own company, 3D Skateboards, in 2013.

Brian Anderson first gained notoriety in the skateboarding world in 1996 and quickly became one of the most popular skaters in the sport. In 2016 Anderson became the first high-profile professional skater to come out as gay, something he never thought he would do. Afraid to come out when he was younger, Anderson put his rage and frustration into his skating.

“I think a part of me was so irritated and angry from holding that in," Anderson told Vice, "so it made me more of an animal on my skateboard.”

Anderson’s skateboarding notoriety has made him a symbol for the LGBTQ+ community, leading him to take an active role in public awareness. Proceeds from sales of his Cave Homo zine, which explores Anderson’s journey as an openly gay man, are donated to the LGBTQ+ suicide prevention nonprofit The Trevor Project.

A magazine cover featuring a bare-chested man on a magazine cover with the text Cave Homo.This is the first issue of the zine Cave Homo, a collaboration with Anderson’s friends, designer Luke Williams and photographer Christian Trippe. Cave Homo became a venue for Anderson’s art, sketches, and photography, highlighting Anderson’s personal interests and his newfound freedom as an openly gay man.

Cher Strauberry

A skateboarder doing a trick with a pink skateboard.Cher Strauberry using her first signature skateboard.

Stevil Kinevil designed transgender skater Cher Strauberry’s first signature deck. Kinevil conveyed to me that he made the board “to celebrate [Strauberry] as a talented skateboarder, but additionally to recognize and honor the diversity of the community who frequents the parking lot where we first met, and spend time together on a weekly basis.”

That parking lot proved to be a safe haven with smooth blacktop, few people, and great curbs for grinds (or slappies, as they are known).

“Transgender skaters haven’t been a visible component in our community until recently,” Kinevil told me, and he wanted to celebrate that shift through this board.

A pink skateboard, broken in half.Strauberry broke her first signature skateboard while doing a backside heelflip down six big steps.
“I was filming my best friend Mae after and she broke her ankle on the same stairs," Strauberry revealed to me. "The rest of the day was spent in the ER, her with her broken foot and me holding what was left of the first Cher board.”
The art on the board was drawn and designed by Olivia Gibb.

Unity Skateboards

A white skateboard with an orange design.This Unity Skateboarding deck is a wood maple laminate construction with a red deck surface. The bottom of the deck has a white ground with an original drawing from Unity Skateboarding founder Jeff Cheung.

Unity Skateboarding is the creation of Jeffrey Cheung, a California-based artist who wanted to provide a safe environment for queer skaters who might otherwise face ridicule and shame in their local skate parks. Unity Skateboarding started with the Unity Press zines Cheung would publish. They spread the word throughout the LGBTQ+ skateboarding community. This led to opportunities for sponsorship and eventually the start of Unity Skateboarding’s own skate team.

“Unity Skateboards will be for queer youth and queer people out there: an encouraging and positive force,” Cheung told Vice. “I am hoping that by being an all-inclusive project, it could be a bigger idea than a gay skate company—and that we can break down barriers together.”

Pave The Way Skateboards

A green and black skateboardThis Pave the Way skate deck is a maple wood laminate with a green top surface. The bottom has a green and black checkerboard design throughout with well-known LGBTQ+ performers, athletes, and activists drawn by company co-founder Miriam Stahl.

Pave the Way skateboards, created by writer and performer Tara Jepsen and graphic artist and teacher Miriam Klein Stahl, celebrates being queer and living life through skate without fear of self-expression. Jepsen and Stahl’s board depicts LGBTQ+ icons who modeled an ethos of acceptance reflected in their impact on skate culture.

Lacey Baker

A collage of the front and back of a skateboard. The front shows Lady Gaga. The back is a torn up board.Skateboards allow for a skater’s personal expression to shine through. Lacey Baker affixed a photograph of their idol, Lady Gaga, to the top surface of her board. The bottom includes sponsor stickers—and depicts the use and abuse a skateboard used by a professional skateboarder experiences.

Lacey Baker began skating at an early age, winning bronze at the 2006 X-Games at 15. It took eight years to finally win gold but when they did, it was on their own terms, as a queer skater.

“That’s really important for me, because for a long time the industry wanted to shape me in a way that wasn’t me," Baker told Huck magazine. "To be unapologetic about my image and who I am and then to have people acknowledge how important that is in the skate industry. . . . I can’t even describe how that feels. To bring together girls who skate, queers who skate . . . and let those worlds collide. I’m lucky to be here.”

Skate is still working on its acceptance of gay and queer skaters, but Baker has hope for inclusion.

“I would love to just carve out a bigger space for women who skate, and queer people who skate and gender non-conforming people," Baker told Hypebae.com, "and just like, really open up that space for people like me, and people that understand what it’s like to experience life this way.”

Jane Rogers is a curator in the Division of Cultural and Community Life.

Posted Date: 
Wednesday, August 21, 2019 - 09:30
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A life drawing class taught by Giacomo Patri at the California Labor School

Archives of American Art
1 photographic print : b&w ; 21 x 26 cm.

A hypothetical analysis of the twinkle in stars : (as told by a child to a teacher)

Smithsonian Libraries
An artist's book, with a structure based on the wishing stars (lucky stars) from Hong Kong.

Cover title.

Publisher and date of copyright from colophon; possible place of publication from label on box.

Consists of one continuous strip of paper (5 x 64 cm.) printed on both sides in black and gold and folded into a pentagonal shape (9 cm.), inside which five small colored paper wishing stars (1-2 cm.) are hidden.

"Handset in Centaur, letterpress printed on Mohawk and written and designed by Katherine Ng ..." --Colophon.

A class portrait at Julius Penn's Art Academy in Vitebsk

Archives of American Art
1 photographic print : b&w ; 9 x 12 cm.

A photograph of Leon Gaspard and fellow classmates, with instructor Julius Penn, at the Art Academy in Vitebsk, Russia.

A World of Lines: A Resource Kit Using Children's Literature, Objects and Art

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Teaching kit employing the approach of the Smithsonian's museum lab school includes art prints, children's literature, objects, and lesson plans with activities. Lesson begins with Harold and the Purple Crayon by Crockett Johnson, leading to an exploration of the many types of lines that make up the world through simple objects such as yarn, string, and pipe cleaners. Reproductions of famous artworks broaden the exploration. Purchase required.

A Visual Journey: Photographs by Lisa Law 1965-1971

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Online photo exhibit of Lisa Law's photographs, which provide glimpses into the folk and rock music scenes of the 1960s, California's blossoming counterculture, and the family-centered and spiritual world of commune life in New Mexico. Examine themes of the 1960's counterculture through the eyes of someone who lived, witnessed, and recorded life on the frontier of cultural change. Also included is a 'What Else Was Happening' timeline of pivotal events in American history and popular culture from 1963 to 1973.

A Treasure at Our Doorstep

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Lesson plan encourages students to explore a nearby historic landmark, documenting their sensory experiences for writing a descriptive essay. Clarifies the difference between primary and secondary resources.

A Teacher and his pupils

Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery

A Tall Ship and a Star to Steer Her By

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Lesson explores transportation past and present, and addresses the use of inexhaustible power sources. Students design their own water transportation using inexhaustible power sources such as solar or wind power.
3457-3480 of 3,562 Resources