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U.S. Army M-1879 junior officer's dress coat worn by John Hanks Alexander

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A navy blue wool U.S. Army M-1879 junior officer's dress uniform frock coat (a) worn by John Hanks Alexander of the 9th US Cavalry with two shoulder knots (b, c). The coat is made from a very dark navy blue wool broadcloth and features a double-breasted reverse-front that closes with seven (7) metal buttons on each front side featuring an embossed design of an eagle holding an olive branch in one talon and three arrows in the other with a shield in front of its chest having a "C" in the middle of it. The coat has a short standing collar that fastens at the center front neck with one (1) metal hook-and-eye. The full-length fitted sleeves close at the slit cuffs with three (3) metal buttons each featuring the same design as the breast buttons on each cuff. A fabric loop is sewn at each outer shoulder and a metal loop at each inner shoulder for attaching the shoulder knots (b, c) to the coat. The tail of the coat has one deep slit at the center back. There are two (2) metal eagle buttons sewn one at either side of the center back waist at the top of the pleated tail. Two (2) additional buttons are sewn one at the bottom of each decorative side placket tucked under the pleat of each tail. The body and tails are lined with a black half-silk satin. The interior breasts, shoulders, and underarms are padded and quilted in parallel lines. An interior waist belt made from the broadcloth is sewn to the interior back and sides, but left loose in the front and fastens with one (1) large flat hook-and-eye at the center front. There is one (1) welted pocket at the interior proper left breast oriented vertically and one (1) welted pocket at the interior proper right breast oriented horizontally. There are two (2) inset tail pockets, one in the lining of each back side tail near the center back slit. All of the pockets are lined with black glazed cotton. The sleeves are fully lined with a cream cotton and silk striped fabric. A black fabric label is sewn at the interior center back neck with copper machine-embroidered text reading "John G. Haas / Lancaster, Pa.".

The shoulder knots (b, c) are both alike with a loop of doubled thick gilded metal cord at the top, a length of braid made from the metal cord, and an oval pillow faced in yellow wool broadcloth and trimmed in three rows of the metal cord. Centered in the pillow is a number "9" made from tightly coiled metal wire, indicating the soldier's regiment. Inside the open loop at the top of the braid is one (1) metal button featuring an eagle behind a shield with a "C" in it. The button is attached to a peg that runs through a hole to the underside of the shoulder knot and is attached to a metal hook. The hook fastens around the metal loop on the shoulders of the coat (a) and is part of a larger fastening mechanism that includes a long hinged clip, which slides through the fabric loops on the shoulders of the coat and then secures around the outer sides of the hook portion. The reverse of the shoulder knots are faced in navy blue wool broadcloth. The yellow wool ground beneath the braided cord and the underside of the oval are covering stiff paper. The inside of the pillow is heavily stuffed with batting to maintain a raised shape.

Dress worn by Denyce Graves in Washington National Opera's production of Carmen

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This black corset and pink ruffled skirt were designed by Donna Langman and worn by Denyce Graves as the lead in the Washington National Opera's production of Carmen during the 1993-1994 season. The corset (a) is made from black silk satin and is sleeveless and strapless. A loop of black woven cotton tape is sewn at the top of both sides with black beaded decoration covering the tape and black beaded fringe hanging below it. These beaded pieces are worn draped across the upper arm, not over the shoulder. The corset closes at the center back with a black metal zipper and one (1) hook-and-eye at the top of the zipper. The interior of the corset is lined with a black silk and cotton floral brocade. The seams are pressed open and serged along the raw edges. Flexible boning covered in black ribbon with a woven floral design is hand sewn to the interior to provide stiff shaping. There are sixteen (16) long pieces of boning around the corset and two (2) shorter pieces of boning sewn one at each front side where the arm meets the chest. A cream fabric label is sewn at the interior proper left back with embroidered and handwritten black text reading "Donna Langman / Denyce Graves [handwritten] / new york". Hanger loops made from the black floral ribbon are sewn at each interior side.

The skirt (b) has tiers of pink iridescent silk taffeta ruffles cascading down the front. A single pink taffeta ruffle runs around the entire bottom of the skirt, which is longer in the back with a slight train. The waist and the back of the skirt are faced in a fuchsia synthetic satin fabric. This fabric is covered on the skirt by a black velvet overlay that wraps around the sides and ends in a v at the center front waist. The velvet is sewn to the skirt around the waist and is tacked around the length of the skirt where the fuchsia fabric meets the pink taffeta ruffle. A length of black lace is sewn around the top edge of the velvet overlay, which resembles a long scarf or shawl wrapped around the waist of a Spanish flamenco style skirt. The skirt closes at the center back using a pink plastic zipper with one (1) metal snap and one (1) metal hook-and-eye. An additional black metal invisible zipper is sewn at the center back of the black velvet overlay, covering the pink metal zipper when closed. Buckram is sewn inside the waistband and the hem of the skirt. The skirt is not lined. Two (2) hanger loops made from pink synthetic fabric are sewn one at each interior side waist.

Green medical scrubs worn by Dr. Ben Carson

National Museum of African American History and Culture
These green medical scrubs were worn by Dr. Ben Carson. The shirt (a) is made from a seafoam green cotton and polyester blend fabric. It is a short sleeved, V-neck T-shirt with straight-cut sides. There is a white strip of fabric along the back collar area. The shirt is reversible, with seams finished on both sides. There is one (1) patch pocket on the proper left breast. One (1) additional patch pocket is sewn at the interior proper left breast. When the shirt is reversed this interior pocket becomes the exterior proper left pocket. A very faded manufacturer's label is sewn at the center back collar that reads "standardtextile / SOFTWEAVE / 55% COTTON / 45% POLYESTER" followed by size and care information.

The pants (b) are made from the same seafoam green cotton and polyester blend fabric. The legs are straight-cut and the pants tie at the waist with woven tape made from a synthetic fiber. The pants are reversible, with seams finished on both sides. There is one (1) patch pocket on the proper left back below the waist. One (1) additional patch pocket is sewn at the interior proper left below the waist. When the pants are reversed this interior pocket becomes the exterior back right pocket. A faded manufacturer's label is sewn at the center back waist that reads "standardtextile / SOFTWEAVE / 55% COTTON / 45% POLYESTER" followed by size and care information.

Ethiopia [Black Journal segment]

National Museum of African American History and Culture
This 16mm film was a special half-hour-long documentary produced by Kent Garrett for the National Educational Television program Black Journal. This documentary examines the cultural and historical life of Ethiopia.

Consists of: 16mm Film (a).

2012.79.1.49.1a: This 16mm film was a special half-hour-long documentary produced for the National Educational Television program Black Journal. This documentary examines the cultural and historical life of Ethiopia. The entire documentary is voiced-over by a male narrator who describes Ethiopia's intersecting political, religious, and social history. The first half of the documentary is spent telling the history of Christianity in Ethiopia, and its ties to and influence on ancient Ethiopia. There are shots of the Obelisk of Aksum in Ethiopia's Tirgay; a 1,700-year-old granite stele that stands 24 meters tall and weighs 160 metric tons. The narrator then describes the historical architecture and founding of the Church of St. George in the city of Lalibela, located in the Amhara Region of Ethiopia. One of eleven monolithic churches in the city of Lalibela, the narrator explains the importance of this group of rock-hewn churches that were built in the late 12th to early 13th century and serves as a pilgrimage for some. Next, there are scenes of the festival of Timket Holiday in Adis Abeba and footage of various Ethiopian tribes singing and dancing. Ethiopians are described as an African people, diverse in tribal association while sharing common African ancestry. The narrator states that it is a common mistake to racially identify Ethiopians as Middle Eastern.

It's The Same Old Game

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A 16mm color film that features interviews with children about their neighborhood, interviews with community activists, and planners that advocate for community involvement. Aimed at the local citizen, this film encourages citizen participation in the planning process. Footage shows problematic aspects of poor urban planning, including air pollution caused by trucks, water pollution, and other problems with industrial areas to close to residential areas. Footage also includes a contentious meeting on the construction of a new high school near Carroll Gardens in Brooklyn.

2012.79.1.52.1a: 16mm color film.

The film begins with a voiceover narration and a soft music soundtrack. The narration explains that without citizen involvement in the planning process, then planning will be, as the title suggests, "the same old game." The film then shows three men standing over a table with a model of a city plan on it. The next scene features Leroy Bowser standing with a pole over a large floor model of New York City. As he discusses housing in the city, he moves around the model and points to different neighborhoods. The next scenes show houses and streets in Jamaica, Queens. Children are interviewed, and they discuss problems with crime and sanitation. The next interview is with Dan De Vore, and he talk about problems with housing that shares neighborhood space with industrial businesses. The footage then shows more street scenes and interviews with the same group of children from earlier in the film. The next scene features a group of planners looking at plans on a table. The next interview is with Max Bond, and he discusses the importance of community power. An unidentified woman joins in and remarks about the "game," and the struggle to figure out how to leverage it to the community's advantage. Max Bond agrees and suggests one way to change the "game" is to that elect people from the neighborhood onto planning commissions and into other offices. The next person to speak is Art Symes, and he remarks that even with getting community people involved in planning commissions, the old methods require change as well. The next scene shows street scenes in Harlem, and then an aerial view of the streets from the top of a building. The next interview is with Paul Davidoff, and he discusses the problems with white professional planners making decisions on planning without working with people on the street and understanding what they need and the problems to fix. The next scenes show various problems with housing near industrial districts. In particular, the film shows the problems in Red Hook, Brooklyn, such as the air pollution close to recreation areas for children. The film continues to show a variety of industrial blight mixed in with housing in south Brooklyn. The next interview is with José Flores, and he discusses how to improve neighborhood aesthetics and the problems with heavy trucks traveling through the neighborhood. The next scenes show the problem with a highway cutting through a neighborhood. The next scene shows a community meeting about a planned high school for Carroll Gardens, Brooklyn. About a half dozen residents speak out about the planning process and how decisions are made. The main issue appears to be black and white children attending the high school together. There are also many shots of the audience at the meeting. The next interview is with Francisco A. Román as he is in the process of moving his mother out of her apartment because of his concerns about rising crime in the Red Hook neighborhood. The next interview is with Dr. J.D. Carroll, and he talks about the planning in a broader sense of how all of the smaller parts fit together across the entire region and the problems with competing interests. The next scene features Greenburg, New York, where low density, low income housing exists away from industrial areas. There are several shots of children walking around and playing basketball. The final scenes area a montage of clips from the film. The film ends with a shot of traffic coming towards the camera as the film credits are displayed.

2012.79.1.52.1b: Original metal film reel.

2012.79.1.52.1c: Original metal film can. On the film can, there is a label with information that reads [Sterling/ Educational Films/ 241 East 34th Street New York 16, N.Y./ Title: Same Old Game/ Print No. I].

Olympics credentials badge for Gabby Douglas

National Museum of African American History and Culture
All-Access Olympic credentials badge. The badge is white with a gold top. On the gold section there is a white silhouette of the London skyline. There is also a [HILTON WORLDWIDE {TM}] logo in grey, gold, and black.

The name [GABBY] is typed in bold in the center or the white portion of the badge. The name [DOUGLAS] is underneath and the word [OLYMPIAN] is in the center towards the bottom. There is a very faint wavy gold design in the background, fading out towards the top.

On the proper right corner there is a [HILTON HHONORS {TM}] logo in grey, gold, and black and a USA logo in red with the Olympic rings underneath. The words [Official Hotel Sponsor] are below the two logos. On there proper left right corner there is a [HILTON HHONORS {TM}] logo with Chinese characters underneath. There is also a Chinese logo with the Olympic rings. The words [Chinese Olympic Committee Official Parter] and some Chinese characters are below the two logos.

The back of the badge is blank and solid white.

The lanyard is red with a black plastic fastener at the top and a silver metal keychain at the bottom.

Samsonite hat box suitcase from Mae's Millinery Shop

National Museum of African American History and Culture
Light brown hard plastic Samsonite hat box suitcase with pale green synthetic fabric lining. The suitcase closes with two (2) metal spring-action latches on either side of the handle. The handle is made from a loop of brown plastic attached to the body of the suitcase with a metal bracket. A metal locking mechanism is above the handle and a metal plaque reading "Samsonite" is below the handle. There are four metal feet on the flat-bottomed edge of the suitcase. The lid opens with a single hinge on the flat-bottomed edge to reveal an open area on the bottom section of the suitcase with five (5) pockets with elastic top openings sewn along the upper side of the case. There is one (1) additional large pocket with an elastic top opening on the interior lid of the case. Two lengths of grosgrain ribbon can be attached to two additional lengths of ribbon with metal buckle loops on their ends, creating two straps for securing items in the open interior area of the case. There is a cream fabric manufacturer's label with burgundy embroidered text glued to the lining of the lid that reads "Samsonite / Luggage / STYLE 4620 / SHWAYDER BROS., INC. DENVER". A square sticker is adhered to the exterior lid of the case depicting a waving man standing under a gazebo in front of a large building with text along the bottom reading "HILTON / Bermuda". A clear plastic luggage tag is looped around the handle with a paper label inside that reads on one side "AA / American / Airlines" and on the other side "Mae Reeves / 41 N. 60th St. / Phila / P.A. 19139". An orange paper freight tag is looped around the handle with elastic string that reads on one side "DELTA AIR LINES / PHL / Philadelphia, Pennsylvania" and on the other side "PHL / Philadelphia, Pennsylvania / FLIGHT 1788 TO PHL / 299a / 298-491".

Model, Static, Davis-Douglas Cloudster

National Air and Space Museum
Wood, fabric and metal exhibit model of a Davis-Douglas Cloudster airliner in blue fuselage with silver wings, cowling, and tail color scheme; with detailed cockpit. 1/16 scale. Circa 1949.

Magnum Paperweight

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Untitled

Smithsonian American Art Museum

George W. Bush Presidential Inaugural Medal

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Portrait of Jeff Donaldson

Archives of American Art
1 photographic print : b&w ; 9 x 7 cm.

Head and shoulders, black and white portrait of Jeff Donaldson.

Photograph of the Wall of Respect

Archives of American Art
1 photographic print on board : b&w ; 19 x 25 cm. Black and white photograph on board showing the Wall of Respect, an outdoor mural created in 1967 on a building at 43rd and Langley in the South Side of Chicago. The mural was conceived and executed by the Organization of Black American Culture (OBAC). The wall features "Black Heroes" of African American history and culture.

Invitation to the OBAC Inaugural Program

Archives of American Art
Invitation : 1 folded sheet : typescript ; 21 x 22 cm. Invitation from the Organization of Black American Culture, Chicago, Illinois to the OBAC Inaugural Program, May 28, 1967.
Invitation is one folded sheet, typescript.
Inscribed (handwritten) on recto are arrows connecting members listed in the OBAC Council and the word "educators."

Memo to OBAC members about the 19 March 1967 OBAC meeting

Archives of American Art
Note : 1 p. : typescript ; 28 x 22 cm.

One page typescript memorandum to OBAC members about the 19 March 1967 meeting. Written by Joe Simpson and dated 23 March 1967.

Notes on the Wall of Respect and the Mural Movement

Archives of American Art
Note : 12 p. : handwritten ; 28 x 21 cm.

Postcard for AFRICOBRA: the First Twenty Years at Nexus Contemporary Art Center, Atlanta, GA

Archives of American Art
1 postcard ; 16 x 23 cm. Postcard for AFRICOBRA: the First Twenty Years, Nexus Contemporary Art Center, Atlanta, GA, sent July 9, 1990. Pictured are artists in the AfriCOBRA group.
Typescript identification on front: Standing left to right: Adger W. Cowans, Michael D. Harris, Jeff Donaldson, Murray DePillars and James Phillips; Seated left to right: Napoleon James Henderson, Wadsworth Jarrell, Akili Ron Anderson, Frank Smith, and Nelson Stevens.
On verso, postcard is addressed to James Phillips in care of Jeff Donaldson.
Handwritten on verso: Jeff- please pass this on to; Mr. Phillips. Isn't; he at Howard; [signature illegible].

AFRI-COBRA III exhibition catalog

Archives of American Art
1 exhibition catalog ; 18 x 26 cm. Exhibition catalog for AFRI-COBRA III at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, 33 pages. Contains writings and black and white reproductions of photographs of artists and works of art.

Gay Pop letter to Jeff Donaldson, Washington, DC

Archives of American Art
Letter : 1 p. : typescript ; 27 x 21 cm. One page typescript letter, signed: "Yours in the Struggle, Gay Pop." Pop, a student at Howard University, expresses praise to Donaldson for the exhibition Africobra.

Flyer for AFRICOBRA I: Ten in Search of a Nation at the Studio Museum in Harlem

Archives of American Art
1 flyer ; 11 x 22 cm. One page color flyer for the AFRICOBRA I: Ten in Search of a Nation exhibition at the Studio Museum in Harlem, 1968-1973.

Lease documents for scaffolding equipment used to work on the Wall of Respect

Archives of American Art
Lease : 3 p. ; 28 x 22 cm. Typescript documents, three pages, regarding the lease of scaffolding equipment from Gilco Scaffolding Company for use in OBAC's Wall of Respect project. Includes return receipt, lease, and order invoice, dated 1967 August 11 to 1967 August 28.
Page one stamped: Return receipt.
Page one and two recto both signed for delivery and receipt, including signature of Jeff Donaldson and unidentified individuals, likely of Gilco Scaffolding Company.

Article from the Chicago Sunday Sun-Times about murals, including the Wall of Respect

Archives of American Art
Clipping : 2 p. ; 34 x 30 cm. Two page article from the Showcase section of the Chicago Sunday Sun-Times titled "People's art: 'More than a distant vision.'"

Regenia A. Perry, Richmond, Va. letter to Jeff Donaldson, Washington, D.C.

Archives of American Art
Letter : 1 p. : typescript ; 28 x 22 cm.

One page typescript letter, signed Regenia A. Perry, Associate Professor, History of Art, of Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, to Jeff Donaldson, Howard University, Washington DC. Perry praises AfriCOBRA and their exhibition at Howard University.

Regenia A. Perry, Richmond, Va. letter to Jeff Donaldson, Washington, D.C.

Archives of American Art
Letter : 1 p. : typescript ; 28 x 22 cm.

One page typescript letter, signed Regenia A. Perry, Associate Professor, History of Art, of Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia, to Jeff Donaldson, Howard University, Washington DC. Perry inquires about including AfriCOBRA and Jeff Donaldson in her book.
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