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Found 595 Collections

 

Lighter, Stronger, Better: Composites

What makes the Boeing 787 Dreamliner so dreamy? Composites. These engineered materials allow aircraft to be lighter and stronger. Explore composites in this fast-paced webcast: learn what they are, how they are made and how they are used in the aerospace industry.

January 28, 2015

National Air and Space Museum
12
 

Lions and Tigers Oh My

This Collection Introduces The Children to Lions and Tigers and how they are in the wild to children and encourages them to start collections of their own based on the Book "Have You Seen My Cat" by Eric Carle

Mary Alexander
18
 

Liquid Gold: The Discovery of Oil in Pennsylvania

Oil existed in shallow pools and was discovered both oozing from the soil and as a contaminent in salt wells.
Arthur Glaser
19
 

Live Downlink with the International Space Station & Astronaut Randy "Komrade" Bresnik - STEM in 30

Watch STEM in 30's live downlink with the International Space Station. Students from around the country got to ask questions live to NASA astronaut Randy “Komrade” Bresnik as he was orbiting 250 miles above the Earth.

National Air and Space Museum
13
 

Lives of Stars

Explore the life cycle of stars and learn about the connection between elements and space through real-world sources and data and meet Smithsonian experts in the field. This collection includes instructional strategy, student activities, assessment, and extension ideas. Organization is made visible by divider tabs indicating such components as concept understanding, Project Zero thinking routines, and calls to action.

This collection was developed by Sandra Vilevac, STEAM Specialist, Washington International School. See Sandra's other collections.

Keywords: supernova, electromagnetic spectrum, nuclear fusion, space, planetary science


Thank you to our sponsor, the Smithsonian Women’s Committee.

#SmithsonianSTEAM


Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
28
 

Living and Working in Space

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to go into space? How about living and working in there? In this program we will explore those questions as well as the benefits and challenges of living and working in space.

May 20, 2015

National Air and Space Museum
17
 

Living Systems

Diverse living organisms fill our planet with beauty and wonder.  Plants, animals and many other creatures may seem to exist on their own, when in reality they are interdependent with the world that surrounds them, living and non-living.  Co-existing with other plants, animals, and man, each living organism is part of a grand, intricately woven web and system that allows for the flow of energy, food and life. Producers, consumers, predators and prey play vital roles in sustaining life on Earth.  This collection provides the opportunity to consider how each organism affects others. A Harvard University Project Zero routine has been included.

Nancy Butler
27
 

Looking at the Moon

Talk with Me!

Having conversations with young children contributes to their thinking and language development. All conversations are good, but research shows that the quality of words children hear matters more than the quantity. Further, what’s best is an exchange; in other words, talk with children, not at them.

The Talk with Me Toolkits give parents and caregivers thematically organized high-quality, authentic materials to make children their conversational partners in discussions that matter. Each online toolkit features captivating videos and real-world photographs, as well as intriguing paintings and other artworks to observe and discuss through conversation prompts.  Hands-on activities and books complete each toolkit. Simple instructions appear right in the toolkits, so you can jump right in. See what interests your child and get started. There’s a lot to talk about!

To read more, see, from the Harvard Graduate School of Education’s Usable Knowledge site, The Brain-Changing Power of Conversation.


Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center
19
 

Looking at the Moon

Talk with Me!

Having conversations with young children contributes to their thinking and language development. All conversations are good, but research shows that the quality of words children hear matters more than the quantity. Further, what’s best is an exchange; in other words, talk with children, not at them.

The Talk with Me Toolkits give parents and caregivers thematically organized high-quality, authentic materials to make children their conversational partners in discussions that matter. Each online toolkit features captivating videos and real-world photographs, as well as intriguing paintings and other artworks to observe and discuss through conversation prompts.  Hands-on activities and books complete each toolkit. Simple instructions appear right in the toolkits, so you can jump right in. See what interests your child and get started. There’s a lot to talk about!

To read more, see, from the Harvard Graduate School of Education’s Usable Knowledge site, The Brain-Changing Power of Conversation.


Talk With Me Toolkit
19
 

M.C. Chang - Worcester Foundation

Famous scientist who developed the birth control pill.


#tcslowell

#APA2018

Mary Frances Levasseur
3
 

Make a COLLAGASAURUS!

What: Learn about history, art, culture and science while creating a fantastic creature with the Smithsonian's Open Access collections.

Age: 2-9

How:
1. Download the COLLAGASAURUS! how-to book created by author/illustrator of the "Astronuts", Jon Scieszka and Steven Weinberg: https://learninglab.si.edu/cab...
2. Use some of the images in this set to make your own creature!
a. For younger children, review body parts they need to make a creature; print out images and have kiddos work on scissor and glue skills. Once their creature is complete, ask them how it would move, how it would eat, where it would live.
b. For older kids, either do the analog method used for younger kids (see 2a.) or use it as an opportunity to work on computer skills using imaging software. Talk with them about the collections they chose; how old they are, where they are from, etc. Discuss how the creature would move and interact with the world given the body parts that were chosen.

3. Afterwards, get a behind-the-scenes peek at how Steven and Jon collage Smithsonian Open Access images -

https://www.youtube.com/watch?reload=9&v=z_-LVBQsXG8


Effie Kapsalis
97
 

Maps and Globes

Maps, Globes, and a story

Linda Jaeger
18
 

Marine ecosystems

cameron harris
5
 

Marine Science Concepts Review

You can use this site to review for the common final exam that you will take at the end of the year. 

Ellen Doyle
1
 

Mars

A current elementary or middle school student will most likely be the first human to step foot on Mars. In this episode of STEM in 30, we will investigate the plans to send humans to Mars and the ongoing research into water and the possibility of life on the Red Planet.

October 21, 2015


This collection was created to support the 2016 CCSSO Teachers of the Year Day at the Smithsonian.

National Air and Space Museum
28
 

Mars

Let's learn about the red planet, Mars!

Jillian Johnston Zillig
1
 

Mars

A current elementary or middle school student will most likely be the first human to step foot on Mars. In this episode of STEM in 30, we will investigate the plans to send humans to Mars and the ongoing research into water and the possibility of life on the Red Planet.

October 21, 2015


This collection was created to support the 2016 CCSSO Teachers of the Year Day at the Smithsonian.

Katelyn Schmidt
28
 

Math: Unstacked

UNSTACKED is a wonderful way to spark inquiry, analysis, and discussion. By visually exploring our images, you can bring the Smithsonian Libraries' collections into your classroom. Use UNSTACKED as a morning exercise, a way to introduce a new topic, or to discover your students' interests. Picture your world, dive into the stacks! 

The research and creation of this project was funded by the Gates Foundation Youth Access Grant.

Jamie Mauldin
10
 

Math: Unstacked

UNSTACKED is a wonderful way to spark inquiry, analysis, and discussion. By visually exploring our images, you can bring the Smithsonian Libraries' collections into your classroom. Use UNSTACKED as a morning exercise, a way to introduce a new topic, or to discover your students' interests. Picture your world, dive into the stacks! 

The research and creation of this project was funded by the Gates Foundation Youth Access Grant.

Smithsonian Libraries
10
 

May the Road Rise Up to Meet You: St. Patty's Day Fun

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring St. Patrick's Day. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about St. Patrick's Day, read articles about magic folk, and listen to the read aloud Rainbow Fish. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
40
 

May the 4th Be With You

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring Star Wars. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also listen to Star Wars Music as well as exploring the stamps made about the movies. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
35
 

Mayor Myers-Design A City!

Follow the steps to design a streetscape. 

Alyssa Myers
19
 

Me and Marvin Gardens and the Effect of Plastic Garbage in Our Water

This collection is created to introduce and enhance the novel study lessons of Me and Marvin Gardens by Amy S. King. The resources will supplement environmental messages and dire warnings found in the book about the pollution of our waterways because of plastic. The collection includes artwork and photographs. 

Monica Bullock
8
 

Medince

         Medicine has be changing lives for centuries.In the early 1700's to the late 1800's  they were not as advance as we are now. They has lots of problems when it came to medicine and surgical procedures.For example they were not as sanitary as we are now.In fact in the 1800's they used herbs such as calomel which they thought  we make their patients feel better but actually caused them to get worst. Around the 1700 they came up with vaccination that will protect them from small pox.In the beginning of the 1800's they invented blood transfusion. Around 1846 they made anesthetic for patients so they will be unconscious during the operation and make it easier for the surgeons to do their operation on the patient with out them being in pain.

             As we go further into the the 1800's you see them become more advance in the technology of medicine and see them make more medical tools to help surgeons and doctors.In 1828, their was an Act that prevented unskilled doctors from being able to practice surgery or other health-related practices. This act left many communities without a doctor, making it hard for people to receive fast medical care. During the 1800's Surgery killed as many as it cured, mostly due to a disease or an infection.Also another thing during this time was that male doctors were not allowed to look at a naked women due to modesty  which  is where we got our midwives from. Their jobs were to help the women during birth or help them with abortions. Midwives were used as medicine because they did a lot more than just deliver babies, they gave support to the soon to be mothers and acted or distracted them from their pain. In the 1800's they haired black women slaves because they were immune to many diseases 

Jocelyn Romero
10
289-312 of 595 Collections