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Found 473 Collections

 

Hawaiian Monarchs

This topical collection includes resources related to the eight monarchs of the Kingdom of Hawaii.  In order of succession, the monarchs are: Kamehameha I (r. 1810 - 1819); Kamehameha II (r. 1819 - 1824); Kamehameha III (r. 1825 -  1854); Kamehameha IV (r. 1855 - 1863); Kamehameha V (r. 1863 - 1872); Lunalilo (r. 1873 - 1874); Kalākaua (r. 1874 - 1891); and Liliʻuokalani (r. 1891 - 1893).  

The Kingdom of Hawaii was established as a constitutional monarchy in 1810 by King Kamehameha I.  In 1893, a coup led by American businessmen driven by sugar and pineapple business interests in the Hawaiian islands overthrew Queen Lili'uokalani.  Despite native protests and Lili'uokalani's efforts to reclaim the throne, the United States annexed Hawaii as a territory in 1898.  Hawaii became an American state in 1959.

This collection is not comprehensive but rather provides a launching point for further research and study.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.

Keywords: Kamamalu, Emma, Kapi'olani, Kapiolani, Kalakaua, Liliuokalani, Hawaiian, royals, royalty

#APA2018

Tess Porter
37
 

guns and stuff used in the American revolution

a collection of guns

David Marchant
10
 

Grace Hopper & The First Computer Bug

A collection about Grace Hopper to use with teaching about historic and inspiring women figures in Computer Science. 

macbetthh
6
 

Golden Spike Anniversary Topical Collection

This collection was created by Jared Tupuola, a Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center intern. Jared dove into the histories of Chinese laborers and the Golden Spike Anniversary, the 150th anniversary of the completion of the Transcontinental Railroad. 

"On May 10, 1869, the Central Pacific and Union Pacific rail lines were connected in a highly publicized ceremony attended by railroad laborers, major financial supporters and the press. Led by industrial tycoon, Leland Stanford, the event commemorated the birth of the First Transcontinental Railroad. The completion of the railroad made national news and was lauded as a great economic and cultural success for the U.S. 

Despite the attention given to the event, there remained one group of contributors who were almost entirely left out of being recognized for their integral work to the project; Chinese railroad laborers. Although making up the vast majority of the physical work force behind the railroad, Chinese labor contributions were largely disregarded. This instance was not unique to many early Chinese Americans who faced discrimination, animosity, and degradation not only in rail work, but in almost every industry and facet of life. The hardships for early Chinese in America were exacerbated by the passage of the Chinese Exclusion Act in 1882 which not only prevented further immigration from China to the U.S., it also birthed an impetus to drive out Chinese communities already established.

Through this collection, the work, lives, and experiences of Chinese laborers and migrants are presented as an opportunity to learn more about how some of America's earliest Chinese residents navigated America in the late 19th Century. This collection provides art, ceramics and information that expounds upon the realities of Chinese American life and the First Transcontinental Railroad while ensuring that the Chinese contributions are not forgotten.  By no means an exhaustive resource, this collection allows for an introduction into Chinese contributions to the Transcontinental Railroad and encourages further exploration into the topic."

Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center
77
 

Golden Spike Anniversary

On May 10, 1869, the Central Pacific and Union Pacific rail lines were connected in a highly publicized ceremony attended by railroad laborers, major financial supporters and the press. Led by industrial tycoon, Leland Stanford, the event commemorated the birth of the First Transcontinental Railroad. The completion of the railroad made national news and was lauded as a great economic and cultural success for the U.S. 

Despite the attention given to the event, there remained one group of contributors who were almost entirely left out of being recognized for their integral work to the project; Chinese railroad laborers. Although making up the vast majority of the physical work force behind the railroad, Chinese labor contributions were largely disregarded. This instance was not unique to many early Chinese Americans who faced discrimination, animosity, and degradation not only in rail work, but in almost every industry and facet of life. The hardships for early Chinese in America were exacerbated by the passage of the Chinese Exclusion Act in 1882 which not only prevented further immigration from China to the U.S., it also birthed an impetus to drive out Chinese communities already established.

Through this collection, the work, lives, and experiences of Chinese laborers and migrants are presented as an opportunity to learn more about how some of America's earliest Chinese residents navigated America in the late 19th Century. This collection provides art, ceramics and information that expounds upon the realities of Chinese American life and the First Transcontinental Railroad while ensuring that the Chinese contributions are not forgotten.  By no means an exhaustive resource, this collection allows for an introduction into Chinese contributions to the Transcontinental Railroad and encourages further exploration into the topic.

Jared Tupuola
78
 

Going for the Gold: The Olympics

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring the Olympics. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about the Olympics, the Special Olympics and athletes who competed. Families can also read articles about the Olympics, learn about the first Olympics, and explore the amazing athletes who have competed to be the best. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
58
 

Georgia O'Keeffe

Jean-Marie Galing
11
 

G is for Victory

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring gardens. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a videos about gardening, learn about victory gardens, learn about seeds, and listen to a Peter Rabbit read aloud. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
48
 

From Medieval to Modernism: The Impact of Classical Art & Architecture

This collection is intended to further educate viewers on the architecture and art in the Classical period using multiple resources as well as the Robert & DiYanni text, Arts and Culture, An Introduction to the Humanities (2012).

Throughout this collection readers will get a glimpse of the start of Classical architecture and how it came to be, how art lined the walls of these buildings and how art through architecture was developed. With that, readers will be able to engage and visualize today's architectural structures and how that culture influences today compared to those between the Medieval times to Modernism. They will also have the ability to recognize the true and inner beauty that lies in this architecture, amidst the chaos that regularly occurred there on a day to day basis. The truth will always remain beautiful even when it doesn't seem that way.

This collection is available for those wanting to see the beginnings of the classical art and it's influences from the medieval times up until modernism and will provide a better visual understanding that before the beauty of what architecture is today, there was once beauty at the start of it all and that remains throughout the years, just presented in different forms. 


#AHMCFall2019

Candi Tate
15
 

From Deer to Dance: How-to Demonstrations and Informational Videos

This collection comes from a family festival at the National Museum of the American Indian that explored uses of leather in Native communities - literally from the hunting and tanning of deer and their hides, to their use in ritual and everyday life. The collection includes demonstrations of deer-hide tanning, moccasin making, bead working, instructions to make a leather pouch and a daisy chain bracelet, and an interview and performance by Lawrence Baker and the White Oak Singers.

Philippa Rappoport
9
 

Frankenstein 200 RB copy

Collection on Frankenstein related resources for the 200th anniversary of the publication of the novel by Mary Shelley... as a sandbox for getting me acquainted with SLL and this project...

Rebecca Boggs
28
 

Frankenstein 200

Collection on Frankenstein related resources for the 200th anniversary of the publication of the novel by Mary Shelley. 

Joe Phelan
15
 

Four Women Who Made American History

Because of Her Story presents a YouTube miniseries where students speak with Smithsonian curators about four women who shaped American history and culture.

These videos were created for a middle school audience and above.

See more YouTube videos from the Smithsonian American Women's History Initiative, Because of Her Story. #BecauseOfHerStory

Because Of Her Story
11
 

Four Eyes are Better Than One

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring our eyes. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about our eyes as well as learn about animal vision. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
48
 

Found Poems and Social Justice: Using Rosa Parks and other sources to create found poems about social justice

This collection includes portraits from the National Portrait Gallery, websites, links to Smithsonian Magazine articles, and other news articles all relating to issues of social justice. #NPGteach

Jan Rubenstein
26
 

Fossils: Highlights Collection

This is a Smithsonian Learning Lab topical collection, which contains images, video, text, and multimedia resources that may complement the Tween Tribune feature, Giving fossils a facelift. Use these resources to introduce or augment your study of this topic. If you want to personalize this collection by changing or adding content, click the Sign Up link above to create a free account.  If you are already logged in, click the copy button to initiate your own version. Learn more here

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
33
 

Fort Tejon

The Native Americans who lived in this area prior to the establishment of Fort Tejon are generally referred to as the Emigdiano. They were an inland group of the Chumash people. Unlike their coastal relatives, however, the Emigdiano avoided contact with European explorers and settlers, and were never brought into one of the missions or even incorporated into the Sebastian Indian Reservation. Once Fort Tejon was established, the Emigdiano often worked as independent contractors for the army, providing guides for bear hunts and delivering fresh fruits from their fields for sale in officers row. 

In 1852, President Millard Fillmore appointed Edward F. Beale to the position of Superintendent of Indian Affairs for California and Nevada, and sent him to California to head off further confrontation between the Indians and the many gold seekers and other settlers who were pouring into California. After studying the situation, Beale decided that the best approach was to set up a large Indian reservation at the southern end of the San Joaquin Valley and to invite displaced Indian groups to settle there. 

In order to implement his plan, Beale requested a federal appropriation of $500,000 and military support for the 75,000 acre reservation he had selected at the foot of Tejon Pass. Colonel Ethan Allen Hitchcock, commander of the Pacific Division of the U.S. Army, supported Beale's plan and agreed to set up a military post on or near the Indian reservation. The army was eager, in any case, to abandon Fort Miller (near Fresno, California) in favor of a more strategically advantageous site in California's southern San Joaquin Valley. 

In August 1854, Major J.L. Donaldson, a quartermaster officer, chose the present site in Canada de las Uvas. The site was handsome and promised adequate wood and water. It was just 17 miles southwest of the Sebastian Indian Reservation, and it was right on what Major Donaldson was convinced would become the main route between the Central Valley and Southern California. 

For almost ten years, Fort Tejon was the center of activity in the region between Stockton and Los Angeles. The soldiers, known as Dragoons, garrisoned at Fort Tejon patrolled most of central and southern California and sometimes as far as Utah. Dragoons from Fort Tejon provided protection and policed the settlers, travelers and Indians in the region. People from all over the area looked to Fort Tejon for employment, safety, social activities and the latest news from back east. 

Lori Wear
64
 

Foreign Help During the American Revolution

 #TeachingInquiry

Marquis de Lafayette, Thaddeus (Tadeusz) Kosciuszko, Bernardo de Galvez, and Wilhelm von Steuben 

Teresa Graham
4
 

Food Podcasting Resources

Resources for lessons on the culture and storytelling elements of food, specifically for the YAG Podcasting project. 

Hazel Arroyo
6
 

Fonts and Feelings - Ai Hashimoto

There's a lot you can get out of font design, one of those is feelings. As a reflection on the various design concepts I have explored at Cooper Hewitt with the Design Scholars, I created a Learning Lab on how the fonts in our everyday lives are connected to the feelings that we portray in our writing. I have pulled resources from designers I have met throughout the DesignPrep Program, including designs from Cooper Hewitt, the Smithsonian, and myself. Below you will see a collection of 10 images (each with a description on the connection to feelings) including a video "Wicked Problems in Type Design" that you can explore.

 ***The descriptions written by me may not depict what the actual designer intended their audience to feel, but they are my interpretation (except for my 2 pieces), so please feel free to build off of or have your own interpretation 

#designthinking

Cooper Hewitt Design Scholars
11
 

Focusing Our Mind and Bodies

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring focusing our minds and bodies. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can learn about yoga, meditation and mindfulness. There are artifacts to explore and videos to watch. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
22
 

Family Helper

Images of children performing tasks that help their family. How are these children helping others? 

What do you do to help out at home? Draw a picture of yourself being a helper.

Jean-Marie Galing
7
 

Fabulous Feathered Friends

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring birds. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about birds as well as explore birds you can see from your window. Families can  watch science videos and read articles about birds. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
61
 

Fabulous Fabrics

Use images to introduce a stamp-printing lesson with primary students. Observe selected images and discuss. . . 

  • What shapes or lines do you see?
  • Which fabrics have repeat patterns?
  • Which fabrics have alternating patterns?
  • What could the fabric be used for?

Play a sorting game with images printed on cards. Categories for sorting could include stripes, plaid, checkerboard, floral, polka dot, etc.

ART MAKING CHALLENGE: 

  • Students will stamp print on paper with cardboard edges, stampers, or found objects to create patterns. 
  • Printed paper will then be cut into clothing for collage self portraits.

Jean-Marie Galing
23
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