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Found 5,751 Collections

 

Shapes

Exploring shapes with preschoolers

Alix Fitzpatrick
18
 

chairs- form and function

Chair design is an excellent example of form and function working together. Some designs favor ergonomics, some favor aesthetics. The best marry the two. Students were challenged to create a chair for a client.

louise brady
45
 

Putting the A in STEAM. How can prototyping push your thinking?

Putting the "A" in STEAM.                                                                               Can you imagine what doesn't exist but could? Can you visually communicate your vision to others? How can prototyping be used as a tool for exploration, invention and communication. 

louise brady
22
 

Meaningful objects

Can objects have meaning? What is symbolically meaningful in your life?  Through photography and text, use aesthetic choices to make your meaning visually strong. 

The first image is from the Smithsonian collection. The other images are from students at Horace Greeley High School in Chappaqua, NY.

louise brady
9
 

Can art be used for social or political commentary?

What are contemporary issues in our world? What is your personal viewpoint on a contemporary issue? Can art be used as an agent of change?

louise brady
28
 

who am I

Search for your personal meaning in life. Who are you as an individual person? How do you connect as  a member of your community? your country? the world?

louise brady
11
 

I'm taking my ball and going HOME!

This collection will serve as the basis for a series of activities designed to promote global competence and to teach for understanding . Specifically, these activities focus on building competence in the domains of investigating the world and taking action. All of these experiences and tasks will use the concept of "HOME" as their point of nucleation or seed, and as a through-line to connect the students to the material and help them extend the material beyond the classroom. 

Resources in this learning lab include:

  1. A collection of global thinking routines to be applied during these encounters, as well as the rationales and goals for their use. 
  2. An example of thinking routines designed to foster global competence based on Homer's Odyssey (I use the Fagles translation) and the work of contemporary Korean-born artist, Do Ho Suh. 
  3. Suggestions for expansion, further interrogation, and fractal extension, including extension into further abstraction.
  4. A series of journal entries charting some of the thinking leading to the production of this learning lab. 
  5. A padlet including documentation of my thinking process and some photos of other pieces by Do Ho Suh: https://padlet.com/debic_mathieu/67572xigbcn 


Timeline:

  • This learning lab collection was originally conceived to be used in an English/Language Arts or composition class. As such, it favors written expression. These writing assignments could be altered, shortened, or dispensed with altogether. 
  • The timeline I had in mind when building this learning lab was about two or three weeks of class time. Obviously it could go longer or shorter, depending on the circumstances of teachers using it. 

#SAAMteach

Mathieu Debic
9
 

Women and Science

These resources are for the students in the Women and Science Honors Seminar at Rutgers, School of Environmental and Biological Sciences. Instructors; Distinguished Professor Joan Bennett and Visiting Professor Catherine Reid. The resources highlight women represented in different Smithsonian collections for their pioneering works in their respective fields.

Women faced challenges when they entered male dominant institutions, such as employment in the fields of science, technology, engineering and mathematics. They faced struggle for gender inclusion, and in some cases, added racial discrimination. In many cases, the accomplishments of women and people of color were rendered invisible in the official histories of institutions. With the pioneering works of feminist activists and gender scholars, counter narratives are now emerging to illuminate the ongoing project of racial and gender inclusion in the 21st  century. 

 For additional resources on women in science at Smithsonian, go to the site Women in Science.  Also the NASA site from Hidden Figures to Modern Figures celebrates the accomplishments of Katherine Johnson, Mary Jackson, and Dorothy Vaughan who contributed as researchers to NASA projects. 

#BecauseOfHerStory

Kayo Denda
17
 

1920s and 1930s Artifacts

This collection illustrates what happened in these years (1920-1930) that made this period of time so important and significant in United States History.

Anna Timmerman
10
 

Our Story (Carver Museum, Cultural and Genealogy Center History)

Our history begins in the modest building that housed Austin’s first library. Built in 1926, this small, wood-framed structure was soon overwhelmed by the demands of its patrons. During this time, the citizens of East Austin, along with the American Association of University Women, began to petition the city about the need for a library in their community. As a result, when a larger central library facility was built in 1933, the original building was moved to its current location on Angelina Street and later resurfaced in brick veneer.

In its early years, the Angelina Street library was simply known as the “Colored Branch”. In 1947, however, it was christened the George Washington Carver Branch Library in honor of the inventor and scientist who brought so much pride to African-Americans. For decades, the Carver Library served the Central-East Austin community, and its patronage and book collection grew steadily.

As patrons increased and space became limited, the need for a larger Carver Branch Library became apparent. Through the efforts of the Central-East Austin Citizens for a New Carver Branch, this issue continued to have a voice. In 1979 a new facility was completed directly adjacent to the original Carver Library.

 

As for the original building – the community imagined a museum and community center that would promote African-American history and achievement in Austin, Travis County, and beyond. On October 24, 1980, their vision became a reality. What was once Austin’s first library, and then later became Austin’s first branch library, opened its doors as the George Washington Carver Museum and Cultural Center, the first African-American neighborhood museum in of Texas.

In a 1998 bond election, the citizens of Austin voted to further expand both the Carver Museum & Cultural Center and the Carver Branch Library. Today, the museum is housed in a 36,000 square-foot facility that includes four galleries, a conference room, classroom, darkroom, dance studio, 134-seat theatre, and archival space. The galleries feature a core exhibit on Juneteenth, a permanent exhibit on Austin African-American families, an Artists’ Gallery, and a children’s exhibit on African-American scientists and inventors.

The historic building now houses the genealogy center. The museum, cultural and genealogy center is owned and operated by the City of Austin Parks and Recreation Department, Division of Museums and Cultural Programs.

#ethnicstudies #africanamericanhistory #georgewashingtoncarver #austintxhistory

carvermuseumatx
4
 

Domingo Ulloa's "Bracero": and "Bittersweet Harvest": Using Art and Historical Documentation to Deepen Understanding

This teaching collection helps students to look closely and think critically by examining Domigo Ulloa's painting, Braceros, and historical documentation related to the bracero program, a series of short-term labor contracts from 1942-1964 in which an estimated two million Mexican men came to the US to work on farms and roads. The collection prompts students to consider the program from a variety of perspectives, including individual, collective, social, economic, and political.  

Included here are the painting, a bilingual video with Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM) curator E. Carmen Ramos, four suggested Thinking Routines - "See, Think, Wonder," "Step In, Step Out, Step Back," "The 3 Y's," and "Think, Feel, Care" - from Harvard's Project Zero Artful Thinking and Global Thinking materials, supporting digital content from the National Museum of American History, and a blogpost from SAAM of two DC student's written responses to the prompt, "What Domingo Ulloa's Braceros Means to Me." 

For use in Social Studies, Spanish, English, and American History classes

#LatinoHAC #EthnicStudies

This collection supports Unit 1: Intersectionality of Economics, Politics, and Policy, of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part B course.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center. 


Philippa Rappoport
10
 

Pioneers from the East: The Sing Family

This collection is comprised of archival content from the Austin History Center and KLRU's Austin Revealed: Pioneers from the East project. This collection features the Sing family, one of three of the first Chinese families in Austin. It explores topics of citizenship, migration, immigration, naturalization, interracial marriage, preserving history, and Asian American history.

#TCSAARC 

#EthnicStudies

Asian American Resource Center Austin, TX
26
 

Asian Americans with Disabilities in America

This collection was created by Mark Ferrer, a Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center intern. "My name is Mark Ferrer. I was the first deaf intern at APAC. I practically researched issues that I thought might help people with disabilities like me. I was resourceful and used the opportunities to create awareness for Asians with disabilities. I entitled my research as Asian Americans with Disabilities in America."


About the Asian Americans with Disabilities in America, Asian is one of the fastest-growing racial groups in the U.S. and the growth rate of Asians with disabilities progressively swelling (worsening). They were being categorized and called the handicapped, the disabled and the feeble-minded. The language barriers, not enough support, being the model minority and confusion between two cultures were only a few of the many challenges they faced. It was during the 19th and 20th centuries that they suffer from discrimination but became beneficiaries when ADA was passed in 1990. It is truly remarkable that this collection will give you information and awareness about the status of the Asians and disabled in America.

Mark Ferrer
20
 

Anasazi

This collection is help my students understand the geographical area the Anasazi were located, and artwork created to further help them understand a piece of music dedicated to the Anasazi.
Melissa Gilbert
9
 

Ancient Greek Vases

Resources and directions for middle school Greek vase art project.


Directions:

  1. On a piece of orange construction paper draw an outline of a Greek vase, (or vessel, pot, jar)
  2. Cut out your vase.
  3. Choose a story or image from ancient Greece. Examples include greek myths, Olympics, and battle stories.
  4. In the center of the vase use a black sharpie marker to illustrate your story.
  5. On the neck and base of your vase use at least 5  of the patterns to decorate. (2+ on neck,3+ on base)
  6. Finally, glue your orange vase onto a piece of black construction paper
  7. Save the extra orange paper that you cut away for decorating the edges like a mosaic alternating with white.


Tracey Barhorst
19
 

Influential Americans

Abigail Burnett
98
 

Photosynthesis

Please watch the video and take the quize right after it!

Sofia Estrada
1
 

Demeter and Persephone: A feminist reading

This collection demonstrates a feminist reading of the Greek fertility myth "Demeter and Persephone." In this myth, we can see how patriarchy supplanted matriarchy and worship of a great goddess. Persephone's fate is in the hands of her father, Zeus, who, while acknowledging that Demeter has power, is able to suppress that power and bestow his daughter onto Hades. With the help of Rhea, the women are able to partially undo Zeus and Hades' plan, so they still maintain some power, but they remain unable to completely overthrow the mens' desires. Instead of using her own power to regain her daughter, Demeter has to use her anger to persuade Zeus to help her recover the daughter he gave away. #MCteach

Megan Howard
6
 

Telling Myth with art

An in-class activity for a college level Intro to Mythology course that has students consider how mythology is not only passed on through oral or written word, but also through art.  #MCteach

Megan Howard
7
 

US History 5th Grade

Unit 4 Unrest and Rebellion Fight for Independence 

US History 

Isabel Garza3
43
 

Mexican American Family Stories through Art

Student activity collection analyzing the work of two very different Mexican American artists, identifying aspects of culture and exploring expressions about Latino experiences in art. Included in this collection, are five paintings highlighting Latino families, paired with observation and analysis questions and interviews with the artists, Carmen Lomas Garza and Jesse Treviño, as well as podcast analyses of the paintings from the museum's director. As a supplement, students could read a book by Garza depicting her childhood memories of growing up in a traditional Mexican American community, or lead a discussion comparing this artwork with other images of Latino families. #ethnicstudies

Lanette Aguero
20
 

Latino Immigration to US #ethnicstudies

Images that tell a story on Latino Immigration to the USA. #ethnicstudies

Lynda Harkins
14
 

Project Zero Thinking Routines

This introductory collection includes the Understanding Map and several of Harvard University’s Project Zero routines. Workshop participants will select a routine(s) based on the type of thinking and understanding they are trying to encourage. The routine(s) can be paired with museum resource(s) (visuals, audio, texts) that (1) align to a topic or theme that will be taught this semester and (2) provide engaging stimuli to prompt discussion. 

#PZPGH #LatinoHAC #APA2018 #TWUtech #WISSIT #EthnicStudies #Docenttips

Cindy Perreira
48
 

Once Upon a Moon

Discovery Theater is a pan-institutional museum theater dedicated to bringing theatre to young audiences and general visitors on and off the Mall since 1969. Let’s go to the moon! In this exciting, interactive show for our youngest audiences, performers and puppets spin new and old stories about the moon’s magic, introducing the magical science that brought rockets to its surface. What new worlds can we dream about next? 

Discovery Theater
66
265-288 of 5,751 Collections