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Found 2,026 Collections

 

Southern Identity: Contemporary Argentine Art

These bilingual (English/Spanish) resources feature activities related to Argentine culture through the lens of contemporary art for families, middle school, and high school students. 

This digital collection is from an exhibition with the same name, organized by the Smithsonian Latino Center with Argentina’s Secretariat of Culture. Southern Identity presented an overview of the major movements and trends in Argentina’s national art scene since 1948 and is organized in four sections featuring political art, landscapes, national identities and abstraction. It was the largest survey of Argentine contemporary art ever organized in the United States and included paintings, drawings, sculptures, video art, photography and prints representing the work of artists working in Buenos Aires and throughout Argentina’s provinces. 

Southern Identity was part of the public program and exhibition series Argentina at the Smithsonian 2010 that commemorated Argentina’s bicentennial.

Smithsonian Latino Center
9
 

"Piecing it Together: Austin Graffiti Art 1984-2004"

"Piecing It Together": Austin Graffiti Art 1984-2004 is an art exhibition focusing on the first three generations of Austin graffiti art, considered the foundation of what many call street art today. The show is organized by each decade which helped shape the backbone of Austin’s vibrant Graffiti Art culture. 1984-1989 is the dawning of Austin's hip-hop culture with high pressure Krylon cans and painting illegally in the streets. These originals were influenced by movies like Style Wars, Beat Street and WildStyle. This first generation understood the four elements of hip hop culture to be a community that embraced graffiti, break dancing, DJing and rapping. 1990-1998 saw a revival of graffiti art with crews forming such as NBK (No Boundaries Krew) which was seminal and a big influence around Texas and beyond. Moving into the 2000’s brought a whole new era of artists with evolving styles and perspective. Low pressure paint cans, a broader color palette, and the internet all allowed more production of and documentation of this previously mercurial art form. Masterpieces could be archived and styles shared with increased access to cameras and computers. Together this group of innovators laid the foundation for the inclusive, diverse, creative graffiti art scene we enjoy today. -Nathan Nordstrom

Nathan “SLOKE” Nordstrom is an Austin, Texas native who has been professionally producing graffiti art since the 1990s. Specializing in the use of spray paint, Sloke travels the world exhibiting and curating art shows, and producing murals for companies including: Apple, Facebook, Nike, Google, Red Bull, Tecate, Jose Cuervo, Pepsi, Scholtzsky’s, Nordstrom, Ray Ban, Pandora, Cartoon Network, Trouble Maker Studios, Univision, Time Warner, Vimeo, Fox Network, CNN, Reagan Outdoor Advertising, SXSW, Nikon, Toyota Scion, Ford Motors, F1 Circuit of the Americas, Rackspace, Tango, R.J. Reynolds, University of Texas at Austin, American Heart Association and many others.

Original gallery exhibit was at the Mexican American Cultural Center (ESB-MACC) in Austin, Texas from January 24, 2020 until March 28, 2020. 

Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center
40
 

Cerámica de los Ancestros: Central America's Past Revealed

This bilingual collection features activities, publications, and videos for middle and high school students as well as scholars and life-long learners on Central American archaeology and history through ceramics from 1000 BC to the present.

For thousands of years, Central America has been home to vibrant civilizations, each with unique, sophisticated ways of life, value systems, and arts. The ceramics these peoples left behind, combined with recent archaeological discoveries, help tell the stories of these dynamic cultures and their achievements. Cerámica de los Ancestros examines seven regions representing distinct Central American cultural areas that are today part of Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, and Panama. Spanning the period from 1000 BC to the present, the ceramics featured, selected from the National Museum of the American Indian's collection of more than 12,000 pieces from the region, are augmented with significant examples of work in gold, jade, shell, and stone. These objects illustrate the richness, complexity, and dynamic qualities of the Central American civilizations that were connected to peoples in South America, Mesoamerica, and the Caribbean through social and trade networks sharing knowledge, technology, artworks, and systems of status and political organization. 

This collection features the past exhibition, Cerámica de los Ancestros: Central America's Past Revealed, a collaboration of the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian and the Smithsonian Latino Center.

Smithsonian Latino Center
17
 

Cultural Expressions: Art for Social Change

This collection features civic engagement, language arts, and visual arts activities using posters from the Division of Community Education of Puerto Rico (DIVEDCO). This Puerto Rican Poster Art was inspired by works created during Works Progress Administration (WPA). Scaled bilingual activities for grades 2-5, 6-8, and 9-12.

Smithsonian Latino Center
6
 

Harlem Heroes

These selections offer a glimpse of the cultural richness and breadth of the Harlem Renaissance, and the contributions each figure made in shaping issues of identity and articulating black culture. 

Shantelle Jones-Williams
15
 

A House Divided: Reconstruction

Political leaders and parties in the tense time after the Civil War proposed various plans for Reconstruction. By observing artwork of this period, students will learn how these plans affected the South (and North) and relationships between people of different races and geographic regions.

You will find guiding questions included in the additional text section of each artwork.

Shantelle Jones-Williams
5
 

Mexican Art & U.S. History: Carmen Lomas Garza

This collection will provide an opportunity for students to analyze artwork, read background information, and connect art with historical events. At the heart of this activity is artwork created by Latino artist Carmen Lomas Garza. These paintings reflect the experiences of Garza's family and Latino life in 1980s America. In addition to image analysis, teachers could extend an opportunity for students to identify and discuss connections between Garza's art and the Mexican American experience from the 1960s to the present. This collection includes:

  • A timeline of U.S.-Mexican American relations
  • Video/audio of Reagan signing the 1986 Immigration Reform Control Act
  • And an overview of immigration reform via ABC-CLIO (requires subscription). 

#ethnicstudies #LISDSS

24A describe how the characteristics of and issues in U.S. history have been reflected in various genres of art, music, film, and literature;

Amanda Blake
24
 

Labor Organizing in the US

This playlist on Labor Organizing in the U.S. is designed for self-guided learning with intermittent check-ins for high school age students. The learning tasks are divided over five days, designed for 30-35 minutes per day, and build on each other. However, students are able to work on this playlist at their own pace. They will engage with primary and secondary sources as well as visual, video, written, and audio texts. Students have the option to complete the tasks online by connecting through Google classroom or print PDF versions of each formative and summative assessments for work offline. By the end of the week, students will create work of art that represents work people are doing today to create change in a current social issue.

  • Formative assessments are represented by a chevron (Learning Check In, Tasks, and Guides).
  • Summative assessments are respresented by a circle (Quiz and Final Task).
  • PDF versions of all formative and summative assessments are in the tiles immediately after the digital versions. 


National Museum of American History
66
 

Libraries From Your Couch

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring libraries. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about research as well as listen to the read aloud Library Lion. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
36
 

New Almaden quicksilver mine

This collection is a resource for those interested in the history and science of mercury mining at New Almaden quicksilver mine. (more to come)

Daniel LaFlash
10
 

Industry, Technology, and Progress in the 19th Century

Integrating portraiture can be a great way to activate what students have learned about a person, an event, or a moment in time. This collection explores the second industrial revolution (circa 1865-1915) which brought forth new ideas for manufacturing and technology. Below is a brief snapshot of the businesspeople and thought leaders who shaped the economy and redefined economic and social class conditions in the mid-late 19th century. 

Guiding questions:

Who are the notable businesspeople and inventors of the second industrial revolution?

How did the second industrial revolution pave the way for entrepreneurs in the early 20th century?

What were some of the socio-economic impacts of the second industrial revolution? 


#NPGTeach 

Ashleigh Coren
38
 

Circular Objects

Circular objects for viewing and inspiration

Heather Hammond
15
 

Art as Argument: Dust Bowl to Climate Change

How have American artists used visuals to bring attention to the pressing issues of their time? Compare and contrast a 1930s painting about the Dust Bowl with one addressing climate change made seventy years later, interpreting them in context to discover continuity and change over time. 

Possible thinking questions for students to use with one or both paintings:

  • Are these artworks primary sources? Does your answer depend on the context in which they are used?
  • What is "truthful" about these artworks? How might we use other sources to corroborate or check their truthfulness?
  • What do you think are the most effective media for making a compelling argument? Why? Student might consider speeches, photographs, newspaper op-eds, data visualizations like charts and graphs, videos/films, music, and visual art.

Resources compiled for a March 2020 National Council for History Education (NCHE) conference session.

Phoebe Hillemann
11
 

The American Story - Thankgiving, Pocahontas, Little Bighorn

Resources to virtually accompany "Telling the American Story", an exhibit of the Museum of the American Indian. Three events are explored: the first Thankgiving, Pocahantas, and the Battle of Little Big Horn.

#TUTEACH

Carey Churchill
10
 

The Great Inca Civilization

This collection gathers teaching resources on Inca architecture and civilization.

#TUTeach

jwaggo1
27
 

Fascinating Wampanoag Artifacts

A collection of interesting artifacts from the Wampanoag culture aligned with the 4th grade Social Studies curriculum. #TUTeach

Dominic Orino
11
 

Mosquito! Podcasting Module

In this modular, multi-part lesson, learners will focus on a Sidedoor podcast discussing mosquitoes. Learners will focus on the content the podcast is delivering and then analyze the podcast for production techniques. The content of the podcast will give the team a base understanding for the focus of their own podcast.

#YAGSidedoor2019

Smithsonian Science Education Center
7
 

May the Road Rise Up to Meet You: St. Patty's Day Fun

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring St. Patrick's Day. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about St. Patrick's Day, read articles about magic folk, and listen to the read aloud Rainbow Fish. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
40
 

All That Jazz: An Introduction

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring Jazz. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about jazz, read articles about Jazz, and listen to the read aloud Rent Party Jazz. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
30
 

Circles of Fun: Hula Hooping

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring hula hoops. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about Oprah (the reader), read articles about hula hoop history, and watch hoop dances performed by native people. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
21
 

Community activists

How did these people improve their communities?
Rebecca West
5
 

Asian Art at Home: Explore Japanese Art

Let the wonder and the beauty of the museum come to you!  Explore Japanese art with educators from the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery with these three lessons.  Each lesson features guided looking at Japanese art and an art-making component.  Each lesson can stand alone; complete one, two, or all three lessons as time allows.  The content needed for each lesson is divided by an arrow; look to the right of each arrow to view the information you need for each lesson.  The lessons are designed for students in 1st through 5th grades.

Did you give one of these lessons a try?  Tag us using #FreerSackler or @FreerSackler on FacebookInstagram, or Twitter.  Email us at AsiaTeachers@si.edu and we will post your work in the Art Gallery section of this page.

Lesson One: Japan and DC Landscapes

  • Explore the landscapes of Japan! Young learners will see, think, and wonder about Japanese landscape paintings as they think about their favorite landscapes of DC.  After seeing and wondering about the landscapes of Japan, learners will sketch their favorite DC landscape. This lesson will take 30-60 minutes to complete depending on skill level and supplies available at home.  For grades 1st through 4th.  Especially designed for the DCPS 3rd grade spring ELA unit on DC landmarks:  Students learn about various monuments, historical and cultural landmarks, and neighborhoods in Washington, D.C. They deepen their understanding of D.C.’s famous cultural and historical landmarks. 

Lesson Two:  Exploring Japanese Landscapes

  • Young learners will zoom in and explore two works of art by the Japanese artist Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1839).  Learners will be invited to make two sketches:  a symbol to represent themselves and a sketch of their favorite month or season.  This lesson will take 20-60 minutes to complete depending on skill level and supplies available at home.  For grades 1st through 3rd.  Especially designed for the DCPS 1st grade spring ELA unit on symbols:  Students learn about common American symbols [...]. Things and figures can be symbolic and have meaning to people. They make connections to the texts [works of art] by thinking about their values and what symbols best represent them.

Lesson Three:  Make a Mini Japanese Folding Screen

  • Daydream and get crafty!  Learners will create a landscape of their dreams.  After a guided meditation, learners will use collage to create a miniature Japanese folding screen using a cereal box or other items found around the home.  The lesson includes modifications if supplies are limited.  Time needed:  40 minutes - 2 hours, depending on supplies on hand and skill level.  For 1st grade through 5th grade.

Freer and Sackler Galleries
21
265-288 of 2,026 Collections