Skip to Content
  • Language
  • End User
  • Educational Use
  • Time Required
(148)
(215)
(299)
(308)
(340)
(2)
(228)
(126)
(57)
(162)
(58)
(58)

Found 363 Collections

 

Seven Minutes of Terror: The Engineering Behind Landing on Other Planets

Rocket thrusters, giant airbags, and a sky crane: these are just a few ways we have landed on other planets. This episode of STEM in 30 will explore the engineering behind these different techniques and what is in store for future missions.

October 26, 2016

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
15
 

Oh, You're Just Full of Hot Air: Hot Air Balloons and Air Pressure

Has anyone ever told you that you're full of hot air? How is hot air different from cooler air? This fast-paced webcast will look at how hot air balloons float and how a change in air pressure affects them.

March 18, 2015

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
14
 

The Engineering Behind the World Record Skydive

On October 24, 2014, Alan Eustace set three world records when he jumped from the stratosphere, including highest exit altitude. Achieving this record took a lot of engineering. On this episode of STEM in 30, follow the path of the suit Eustace wore from concept to design and from production to execution.

April 11, 2018

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
9
 

Staying Safe is No Accident The Science of Safety

Do you feel safe when you travel in a car or plane? A lot of engineering and science goes into making sure that the vehicles we use every day are safe and secure. Join STEM in 30 as we take a look at the science of safety.

March 14, 2018

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
7
 

What Training Do I Need to Be an Astronaut?

Did you know that training for a spacewalk requires a 6.5 million gallon swimming pool, a team of divers, and a mock-up of the International Space Station? Astronauts have to train for a variety of different jobs they have to do in low Earth orbit. Once on the station, astronauts run science experiments (sometimes on themselves), fix toilets, and run the robotic arm. Do you think you have what takes to complete astronaut training? Find out on this STEM in 30.

February 28, 2018

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
11
 

The Airplane's Family Tree From the Wright Brothers to Today

Did you know that the parts of airplanes today can be traced directly back to the Wright Flyer and the work of Orville and Wilbur Wright? Join STEM in 30 as we trace the family tree of the airplane from that first flight on December 17, 1903, to today.

December 13, 2017

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
9
 

Meet Orion and SLS, America's Next Great Spacecraft

How are we going to get astronauts to Mars and back safely? How many crew will be making this trip? And how big will this rocket have to be? We will answer these questions and many more as STEM in 30 looks at the Orion, a spacecraft built to take humans farther than they have ever gone before.

November 15, 2017

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
7
 

The Psychology of Long Term Space Flight Music, Art and Creature Comforts

If you've ever taken a long trip, you know that bringing your favorite things along will help get you through the journey. The same goes for astronauts in space. Music and the arts entertain them and give them a chance to break away from their demanding schedules. In this episode of STEM in 30, we'll dive into how music, art, and creature comforts helps astronauts cope with long-term space travel.

Novermber 1, 2017

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
8
 

The Science and Stories of Flying Space Shuttle Discovery

The Space Shuttle Discovery is one of the National Air and Space Museum's key artifacts. The longest-serving orbiter, Discovery flew 39 times -- more missions than any of its sister ships. In this episode of STEM in 30, we will look at the science behind flying the space shuttle and explore the stories of those who flew on her.

October 18, 2017

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
12
 

Patent Office

Have you ever had a really great science fair project? Have you invented something? Have you had an idea that would be a great help to you or someone else? If so, you need to learn about patents. Patents help protect unique ideas, like the mousetrap. On this episode of STEM in 30, learn about patents, and how they are used.

September 20, 2017

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
7
 

Solar Eclipse Special: Live from the Path of Totality

A total solar eclipse will sweep across America on August 21, 2017. Tune in to STEM in 30 as we celebrate the Great American Eclipse live from Liberty, Missouri, which is on the Path of Totality. This means that the total solar eclipse will be viewable, weather permitting, and we’ll be there to show it as it happens. We will also be live from the Phoebe Waterman Haas Public Observatory at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC, answering FAQs about eclipses.

August 21, 2017

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
9
 

Structure & Function

Learn how animals have external structures that function to support survival and behavior.

SmithsonianScienceAshley
12
 

Access Series: Animals - Domestic and Wild!

This topical collection of artworks is all about animals—domestic pets, and wild, untamed beasts. Horses, elephants, dinosaurs, zebras, pandas...cats, hogs, frogs, dogs, lions, tigers, and bears; fish and fowl, monkeys that howl - you'll find all of them here. This collections was originally used in a collage art activity (printed out; using paper, glue, and art materials), and as a discussion prompt in an informal learning activity with a group of teens with cognitive disabilities during a summer camp program. Other suggested uses beyond collage and discussion prompts would be a writing exercise, "Which animals have you seen before and where did you see them? If you could have any one of these animals as a pet, which would you choose and why?" Use the visible thinking routine, "See|Think|Wonder" as a starting point for the writing prompt, and the images for inspiration.


Tags: Decision Making, Disabilities, Self-Determination, Self-Efficacy, Student Empowerment, All Access Digital Arts Program

Debra Ray
278
 

Social Justice: National Portrait Gallery Resources

This collection previews the fifth and final seminar of the 2017 Montgomery College / Smithsonian Institution Fellowship seminar series, The Struggle for Justice. Two National Portrait Gallery staff members will lead this event: David Ward and Briana Zavadil White.

Resources and questions included in this collection have been chosen by the presenters for participants to explore and consider before the seminar itself.

#MCSI

David Bedar
24
 

Apollo

One small step for man, one giant leap for mankind, but in order to take those small steps, it took thousands of people from around the country to develop the tools and technology that got us to the Moon and back. In this episode of STEM in 30 learn about why we went to the Moon, what we accomplished, and what's next.

October 1, 2017

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
9
 

World War I: Legacy, Letters, and Belgian War Lace

In this STEAM (science, technology, engineering, art, math) inspired STEM in 30, we will look at some of the technological advances of World War I that solidified the airplane's legacy as a fighting machine. In conjunction with the Embassy of Belgium, we'll also dive deep into how the war affected the lives of children in an occupied country and how lace makers helped feed a nation. The episode will also look at present works of art by artist soldiers on display in the Artist Soldiers: Artistic Expression in the First World War exhibition.

April 26, 2017

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
14
 

Taking the fast lane to orbit: The technology of rockets and racecars

Many of the technologies used in NASCAR are the same as those used in space travel, and many of the forces that keep a plane in the air also keep a racecar on the road. Join us as we broadcast STEM in 30 live from the NASCAR Hall of Fame in Charlotte, North Carolina and look at the crossover between these forces and technologies.

February 22, 2017

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
19
 

The Biology of Long Term Spaceflight

Since the first humans launched into space in 1961, there have been questions about how the human body would react to being beyond Earth's atmosphere. While most of the basic questions have been answered, many remain, and are the basis for continued research on the International Space Station. Finding answers to these questions is an important step toward sending humans to Mars. Join STEM in 30 as we explore this research and the impact of long-term space travel on the human body.

January 25, 2017

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
12
 

Moon Rocks

Twelve men have walked on the Moon. While the rest of us remain Earth-bound, we've been able to learn about the Moon from the rocks these 12 astronauts brought back for scientific study. We have also found lunar meteorites here on Earth—meteorites produced by impacts hitting the Moon.

May 25, 2016

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
31
 

Helicopters the science of vertical flight

The idea of vertical flight has been around for a long time. As early as 400 BC Chinese kids were playing with bamboo flying toys. In the 1480s Leonardo da Vinci made the first recorded advancement in vertical flight when he sketched his aerial screw. We have come a long way since then! This episode of STEM in 30 will explore helicopters: their design, how they work, and the functions they play in our society.

May 11, 2016

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
22
 

WWI: How History Shaped Technology

98 years ago this week, the United States entered World War I. The Wright brothers had only taken to the sky 14 years before, but airplanes still played a vital role in the war effort. Because of the events of WWI, airplane technology developed at an incredible rate. This fast-paced webcast will look at how airplanes changed in this short timeframe, how other technology advanced, and how airplanes were used throughout WWI.

April 8, 2015

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
11
 

Earth Day: A View from Above

The people of Earth didn't see a photo of our planet until the late 1960s. Photos of Earth changed the way we think about our planet. This fast-paced webcast will look at the beginnings of Earth Day and how a better understanding of our place in the universe has evolved through photographic scientific discoveries.

April 22, 2015

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
11
 

Living and Working in Space

Have you ever wondered what it would be like to go into space? How about living and working in there? In this program we will explore those questions as well as the benefits and challenges of living and working in space.

May 20, 2015

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
14
 

Time and Navigation

If you want to know where you are, you need a good clock. For centuries sailors have used clocks to locate where they are out at sea. Today we use synchronized clocks and orbiting satellites for location. In this episode of STEM in 30, we'll take a look at the challenges of navigating at sea, in the sky, and even in space.

August 26, 2015

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
11
265-288 of 363 Collections