Skip to Content
  • Language
  • End User
  • Educational Use
  • Time Required
(158)
(261)
(350)
(344)
(395)
(2)
(257)
(146)
(66)
(184)
(72)
(69)

Found 419 Collections

 

Astrophotography: Student Activity in STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics)

In this student activity, you’ll use specialized image processing software to bring out visual details from images of objects like the Moon, Sun, star clusters, nebulas, and galaxies. After you analyze your own image(s), you’ll have an opportunity to research related astronomy information and to share your scientific and artistic interpretations of your telescope data.
Ashley Naranjo
15
 

Alcoholic Beverages in the 1700s

Throughout history alcohol is something that has been equally loved and hated, and there hasn't been a clear answer as to whether it is better or worse for society. This collection is showing the versatility of alcohol's uses prior to the mid-19th century. In this time period alcohol was consistently used as a medicine and I have included multiple variants of the medical purposes of these alcoholic beverages and mixtures. Also included in this collection is alcohol being used for medicinal purposes for the first president of the United States of America; George Washington. While the descriptions given for these pharmaceutical mixtures may not have been completely accurate they were obviously in some way effective or perceived to be so during this time period prior to major medical advancements that have been made today.

The secondary aspects of this collection features articles that include descriptions of different aspects of alcohol in society then and today. One of the examples is a chart from the 1790s that is condemning alcohol use and shows that even back in that time period many people understood that alcohol had many downsides and should be taken seriously, although depending on your perspective they were likely being a bit too strict about the use of it. Another article details a genetic feature known as the "Tipsy Gene" which is present in 10%-20% of the human population and drastically decreases the chances of alcoholism in the people that contain it. With such a small number of people that have a natural predisposition against alcoholism it is no surprise that is has been so prevalent in society up until today.


Brandon Salahuddin
10
 

John James Audubon

Collection of works created by or related to John James Audubon, naturalist and artist.

Pamela Curtin
16
 

Exploring Identity: How can portraiture conceal or reveal?

What is identity? How is it constructed? These activities investigate how portraits can conceal or reveal aspects of identity. How does the artist choose to portray an individual? How does the sitter choose to be shown?

This collection includes a three-part activity that can be modified by choosing to spend more or less time sharing out as a group. It begins with a discussion about identity, using the Chalk Talk Thinking Routine and a comparison of two portraits to further push students' thinking on how portraiture can both conceal and reveal aspects of identity. In the next parts of the activity, students are able to choose from a variety of portraits for individual reflection and then come together as a group to discuss a larger work to about culture and identity. Several Project Zero Thinking Routines can be used to stimulate and record thinking. 


Part I: Chalk Talk and comparing portraits

Students participate in the Chalk Talk Thinking Routine using the questions provided. A quick gallery walk where students circulate and read all responses can allow the class to get a feel for the many (or singular) perspective(s) of identity. Using the See-Think-Wonder Thinking Routine, students compare and contrast two portraits: LL Cool J by Kehinde Wiley and John D. Rockefeller by John Singer Sargent. Students can share with a neighbor and then out to the larger group or simply share out as a large group depending on class size, etc. 

 

Part II: Portraiture and Identity

Using the Individual Exploration of Portraiture worksheet, students can choose one image from the fifteen provided and spend some time exploring their selected portrait. Students can be given 5-10 minutes to interact with their chosen image. Using one of Roger Shimomura’s portraits, students will use the Unveiling Stories Thinking Routine to better understand the many layers to this work of art. Again, students can share out in pairs first or simply share out to the whole group depending on class size, etc.

 

Part III: Returning to chosen portrait and final reflection

Students will once again return to their selected portrait and complete the "second look" section of the Individual Exploration of Portraiture worksheet. A final reflection about identity and portraiture can be completed either as a group or individually using the I Used to think…; But Now I Think… Thinking Routine.

#NPGteach

Emily Veres
23
 

Climate Change Online Conference Series: Archive and Related Teaching Resources

This online conference series invites educators and students to explore Smithsonian research and collections related to the evidence, impact, and response to climate change. Smithsonian curators and researchers explore the evidence of climate change, as well as the impact of climate change on the environment, wildlife, biodiversity, and human populations. Smithsonian experts also lead discussions on how people are responding to the threats posed by climate change. Includes the archive of each session, with teacher-created suggested lessons that utilize Visual Thinking Strategies. Original Airdates: Fall 2009

Ashley Naranjo
25
 

Express Yourself: Creating a Visual Journal with the Portrait Gallery

This collection was created in conjunction with a professional development workshop for teachers held at the National Portrait Gallery in 2017.

How can journaling transform the way your students experience museums and individual artworks? Sean Murphy, the art teacher at Samuel Tucker Elementary School in Alexandria, VA and the Portrait Gallery teamed up to introduce ways of incorporate journaling into your classroom. Participants explored the metacognitive benefits of using art journals in both the classroom and the museum. This workshop included both gallery and studio experiences. 

#NPGteach

Gayle Kraus
15
 

Express Yourself: Creating a Visual Journal with the Portrait Gallery

This collection was created in conjunction with a professional development workshop for teachers held at the National Portrait Gallery in 2017.

How can journaling transform the way your students experience museums and individual artworks? Sean Murphy, the art teacher at Samuel Tucker Elementary School in Alexandria, VA and the Portrait Gallery teamed up to introduce ways of incorporate journaling into your classroom. Participants explored the metacognitive benefits of using art journals in both the classroom and the museum. This workshop included both gallery and studio experiences. 

#NPGteach

Briana White
15
 

Strange and Curious Smithsonian Jobs I

This collection features articles and images on two Smithsonian experts, Carla Dove and Chris Crowe, who will be speaking at the Smithsonian Associates' Ripley Center on Tuesday, February 27, 2018. For more information and to buy tickets online, go to: http://bit.ly/2AMP8Ae.


Carla Dove is a forensic ornithologist at the Natural History Museum who focuses on snarge, which is the remains of dead birds. She will be speaking about her unusual job, and describing some of her more uncommon discoveries and the difficulties in identifying them.


While working as a bird keeper at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, Chris Crowe met Walnut, an aggressive white-naped female crane who responded violently to potential mates. Walnut took an instant liking to Crowe, and the two have been great friends ever since.

Ryan Camire
10
 

A Plane's Purpose

This learning lab will help aid the unit plan based on engineering and design. The learning lab "A Plane's Purpose" will be used during the first of three lessons in the unit plan. 

The first lesson is where the students will learn all about the functions and purposes of certain planes. This lab can be used during and after the lesson. When used during the lesson, the instructor can use it to provide information about the planes. After the lesson, students can refer back to it on their own to help them with research, details, or ideas. 

When using the learning lab during the lesson, make sure to go over each plane and what is was used for. The last plane in the learning lab should specifically be the Douglas C-47 because it is a plane that had a variety of uses. Emphasize that the way that the C-47 was designed, allowed it to be versatile, which is why design is important when the students begin their own. With the different images of the C-47, you can show how it is used differently in each mission. At the end of the lesson, go back and review the different aircrafts and what they were used for. You can also introduce other aircrafts that have other uses that were not mentioned in the lab.

 The purpose of the lab is to help students identify details that they might want to incorporate when designing their plane. 

Samantha Tufaga
6
 

How Planes Fly

This is an introduction to the lesson series to Canvas vs. Aluminum planes. In this collection, students will be looking at different types of planes and how planes fly. The first resource is a video with Peter Jackson and learning how to fly a WWI airplane. The next four slides are different types of planes. The first two are planes from WWI and the second two are planes from WWII. The last resource is an external link to NASA's resource on the importance of the Forces of Flight meaning drag, lift, thrust, and weight. It also talks about the different dynamics of flight.  

Kaitlin Kim
6
 

Destination Moon: Suiting Up for Space

How did the space suit come to look the way it does? From the United States Navy's Mark IV pressure suit to the Apollo AL7 model, this collection explores its evolution. Investigate the hotspots in each image, and watch the videos included. Try to put yourself in the place of an astronaut - what are their needs, and wants? 

Next, investigate the roadmap for the developing Mars One mission. How will a Mars mission differ from the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo programs?

After exploring the collection, see if you can redefine the "space suit" problem for the next generation of space explorers - specifically those going to Mars.  Will astronauts need more mobility? More protection? What insights did you gain from looking at this collection? Write down the problem and any critical information gained. 

Additional Activities: 

1. Come up with as many solutions as you can to the defined problem. Don't worry about testing them all - let your imagination run wild - and challenge yourself to come up with lots of different solutions. 

2. Talk with a partner to see which solution has the most merit between you both. Refine your idea based on this conversation. 

Finally, prototype! Use simple, inexpensive materials to model your design. 

Christina Ferwerda
7
 

Space race

This collection is supporting my research paper on the History of the Space Race and how it lead to the US successfully putting a man on the moon, a feat they have not repeated in over 40 years.

Raymond Turner
13
 

Destination Moon: NASA Art

Established in 1962, the NASA Artists Cooperation Program gave several artists unrestricted access to several NASA facilities. The goal was to communicate the emotional tone and the cultural significance of space exploration.

This collection uses the "Connect Extend Challenge" visible thinking strategy developed by Project Zero at Harvard University. This strategy encourages students to make connections between new ideas and prior knowledge. It also encourages them to make a personal connection to an artwork or topic.

This lesson helps teachers create connections between works of art and the study of space exploration, and to help teachers use art as a force for developing students’ critical thinking.  

Observe and discuss the first image as a class. Use the "Connect Extend Challenge" to discuss the image as a class. Ask the following: 

  • How is the artwork or object connected to something you know about?
  • What new ideas or impressions do you have that extended your thinking in new directions?
  • What is challenging or confusing? What do you wonder about?

Provide any background knowledge that enhances the conversation, using the metadata information about the NASA Artists Cooperation Program. 

Next, divide the students into 4 groups. Have them use the same questions to discuss one of the 4 images that deals the Apollo 11 launch. Wrap-up the discussion by having each group share out key thoughts and responses. Repeat the same process with the 4 images that represent Mission Control (note, Mission Control Images are from a selection of Apollo missions). 

Finally, students should choose one of the final 4 images to investigate, using the "Connect Extend Challenge" to guide their exploration. Their work could be shared verbally in a paired group, or written as a personal essay. 


Christina Ferwerda
13
 

Strange and Curious Smithsonian Jobs I

This collection features articles and images on two Smithsonian experts, Carla Dove and Chris Crowe, who will be speaking at the Smithsonian Associates' Ripley Center on Tuesday, February 27, 2018. For more information and to buy tickets online, go to: http://bit.ly/2AMP8Ae.


Carla Dove is a forensic ornithologist at the Natural History Museum who focuses on snarge, which is the remains of dead birds. She will be speaking about her unusual job, and describing some of her more uncommon discoveries and the difficulties in identifying them.


While working as a bird keeper at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, Chris Crowe met Walnut, an aggressive white-naped female crane who responded violently to potential mates. Walnut took an instant liking to Crowe, and the two have been great friends ever since.

Katie Lee
10
 

Lions and Tigers Oh My

This Collection Introduces The Children to Lions and Tigers and how they are in the wild to children and encourages them to start collections of their own based on the Book "Have You Seen My Cat" by Eric Carle

Mary Alexander
18
 

Robots

Lesson Prompt: Look at each robot and imagine what it can do. How can it help people? If you were to design your own robot, what would you want it to do to help your family? Sketch your ideas and then draw your robot design.

Jean-Marie Galing
7
 

Animals in Nature

Look at each scene of animals in nature and think about what they could be doing. What do you see? What do you think is happening or is going to happen? What does it make you wonder?

Katie Grywczynski
4
 

Hurricanes

Students will use the See/Think/Wonder strategy to make inferences about Hurricanes. 

Danielle Friend
5
 

Exploring Scientific Innovation: Process, Product and Impact.

This collection consists of  three activities exploring different aspects of invention.  Students are invited to examine how inventions are linked, the impact of innovation on society, and the ethical implications of innovation.  Although designed to work as a unit, the lessons can be used individually.

Guiding Questions: What factors influence innovation in science? How do humans use science ? To what extent is science a group or individual process? Are all discoveries good or can they have a potentially negative effect?

In the first activity, students consider the process of invention by looking closely at images of inventions and exploring the connections between them. Students might consider which object was invented first, the microscope or the spectacles or investigate the relationship between glass, the telephone and the computer.

Students then view the short video on the manufacture of fiberglass, which looks at the process of innovating the glass manufacturing industry and the social and economic factors that propelled the invention of fiberglass. 

Time: 50 minutes.

Building on the student’s earlier thinking about innovation, in this activity they explore how new inventions shape our understanding of our world and their impact on our daily life.  Students are invited to explore images from artwork, advertisements, and leaflets and explain what each reveals about our changing world in both positive and negative ways.

This activity can be done individually, in pairs or in small groups followed by whole class sharing.

Time: 50 minutes, depending on the number of images explored.

The final activity delves into the ethics of invention and innovation, taking a broader look at the purposes and intended/unintended consequences of progress. This activity could also form  the basis for further research into other inventions and their implications.

 Time: 30-minutes

 

 

 

Lisa Holden
28
 

Food Chain -- Lesson Plans and Information

How does fishing, pollution and human activity affect the energy balance in the ocean?

The oceans are an important resource for much of humanity. In the United States alone, about one in six jobs has something to do with the ocean. Unfortunately, while humans depend on the ocean for many different things, their activities can also have a negative effect on the ocean and its wildlife.

OVERFISHING OF SPECIES

One of the biggest effects humans have on the ocean is through fishing. An increasing demand for protein has led to an increase in large-scale fishing operations, and throughout the 20th century, many countries failed to put safeguards into place to prevent overfishing. As a result, the populations of a number of large fish species have dropped by as much as 90 percent from their preindustrial populations. This depletion has led to disruptions in ocean food chains, removing predators and allowing other populations to grow unchecked. As the populations of targeted fish decline, many operations move down the food chain to other species, and over time this can cause significant alterations to marine ecosystems.

POLLUTION AND DUMPING

Human pollution also has a significant effect on the oceans. In the 1980s, travelers passing through the Pacific Ocean began to notice areas containing a high concentration of plastic trash, apparently collected by the ocean's natural currents into one area. The so-called Pacific Trash Vortex may contain up to 1.9 million pieces of trash per square mile, and a similar patch of garbage exists in the northern Atlantic. In addition, oil spills such as the one resulting from the Deepwater Horizon fire in 2010 can contaminate large stretches of the ocean, wiping out entire populations of fish and other species and affecting the regional ecosystem for decades.

CARBON EMISSONS

Air pollution also affects the oceans. As the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere increases, the ocean absorbs some of the excess. The gas reacts with seawater and reduces its pH, increasing the acidity of the water. Since the industrial revolution, the pH of the ocean has decreased by 0.1 pH, representing a 30 percent increase in the acidity of seawater. This affects the growth of animals and plants in the ocean, weakening coral and shellfish.

ORGANIC WASTE

Organic waste dumped into the oceans can have a devastating effect on ecosystems. Excess nutrients from fertilizers and sewage runoff flow into the ocean via rivers, and this sudden abundance of organic material can disrupt the balance of life in affected areas. Organic pollution can cause algae blooms, a rapid increase in certain species of microorganisms that may produce toxins or consume the free oxygen in the region, killing off or driving away other species.

 


Michele Hubert
10
 

Migration - Lesson Plans and Information

How was migration affected by the use of canoes/boats?

The earliest human migrations and expansions of archaic and modern humans across continents began 2 million years ago with the migration out of Africa of Homo erectus. This was followed by the migrations of other pre-modern humans including Homo heidelbergensis, the likely ancestor of both modern humans and Neanderthals.

Michele Hubert
6
 

Weather and Climate (Earth and Space Systems)-- Lesson Plans and Information

What does the weather do to the ocean currents?

Ocean water and currents affect the climate. It takes a greater amount of energy to change the temperature of water than land or air; water warms up and cools off much slower than land or air does. As a result, inland climates are subject to more extreme temperature ranges than coastal climates, which are insulated by nearby water. Over half the heat that reaches the earth from the sun is absorbed by the ocean's surface layer, so surface currents move a lot of heat. Currents that originate near the equator are warm; currents that flow from the poles are cold.

The Great Ocean Conveyor Belt

The great ocean conveyor belt is an example of a density-driven current. These are also called thermohaline currents, because they are forced by differences in temperature or salinity, which affect the density of the water.

The great ocean conveyor belt begins as the coolest of all currents - literally. At the beginning of the conveyor belt:

The Gulf Stream delivers warm, and relatively salty, surface waters north to the Norwegian Sea. There the water gives up its heat to the atmosphere, especially during the frigidly cold winters. The surface waters cool to near freezing temperatures, at which time they become denser than the waters below them and sink. This process continues making cold water so dense that it sinks all the way to the bottom of the ocean.

During this time, the Gulf Stream continues to deliver warm water to the Norwegian Sea on the surface. The water can't very well pile up in the Norwegian Sea, so the deep cold water flows southward. It continues to flow southward, passing the Equator, until it enters the bottom of the Antarctic Circumpolar current. It then drifts around Africa and Australia, until it seeps northward into the bottom of the Pacific.


Michele Hubert
10
 
 

Nile River

The Nile River is a the longest river in the world, and is a north flowing river in Northeastern Africa. 

Ani Flandreau i3
7
265-288 of 419 Collections