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Found 464 Collections

 

Hustle in Our Muscles

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring muscles. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about muscles, watch how animals use their muscles, and listen to the read aloud Sebastian's Roller Skates. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
43
 

Humans and the Footprints We Leave: Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship 2020 Opening Panel Resources

This collection serves as an introduction to the opening panel of the 2020 Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program. This year's theme is “Humans and the Footprints We Leave: Climate Change and Other Critical Challenges." Three Smithsonian staff members will present at the session, including Igor Krupnik (Curator of Arctic and Northern Ethnology collections and Head of the Ethnology Division at the National Museum of Natural History), Alison Cawood (Citizen Science Coordinator at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center), and Ashley Peery (Educator for the exhibition "Outbreak: Epidemics in a Connected World, " at the National Museum of Natural History). Their bios, presentation descriptions, and other resources are included inside.

As you explore these resources, be sure to jot down any questions you have for the presenters. It is sure to be a fascinating and fruitful seminar series!

#MCteach

Philippa Rappoport
17
 

How We See The Sun

This collection focuses on the Sun as the center of our Solar System and is central to people's lives around the world.  This collection includes art and science images that depict the Sun, and recommendations on how to explore these images using close looking. 

Keyword: #airandspace, National Air and Space Museum, NASM

National Air and Space Museum Smithsonian
78
 

How to Make a Ti Leaf Lei: Demonstration video, children's stories, dances, and contextual images

Lei making is an important part of Hawaiian culture. These twisted strands are worn on important occasions and given as gifts of welcome. In this collection you'll find a demonstration video by Mokihana Scalph, as well as performances of children's stories, dance performances, and images of leis and ti leaves, to give context to the performances.

Philippa Rappoport
9
 

How did World War II affect West Africa?

World War II was a global conflict affecting all regions of the world, including West Africa. Africans from British and French colonies fought all over the world in the militaries of their colonizers. When Germany invaded France in 1940, Africans in French colonies  were divided between the Vichy government in West Africa and the Free French resistance in Central Africa. The currencies issued by the two separate governments illustrate this divide. 

NMAH and London School of Economics
5
 

How did new African countries use money to show their independence?

Starting in the late 1950s, African nations became independent from European colonial powers. They used their new currencies to demonstrate their sovereignty by replacing European heads of state with national leaders.  The new national coins and banknotes also depicted indigenous currencies like cowrie shells in Ghana and kissi pennies in Liberia, celebrating African cultural heritage. 

NMAH and London School of Economics
8
 

How Did Mia Hamm Inspire More Women to Play Sports?

Mia Hamm helped popularize soccer in the U.S. and inspire a new generation of athletes.

Because of Her Story presents a YouTube miniseries where students speak with Smithsonian curators about four women who shaped American history and culture. In How Did Mia Hamm Inspire More Women to Play Sports?, Kamau, a student, speaks with Eric Jentsch, curator at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, about Hamm's legacy.

See more YouTube videos from the Smithsonian American Women's History Initiative, Because of Her Story. #BecauseOfHerStory

Because Of Her Story
12
 

How Did Kitty Cone Change Disability Rights?

In 1977, 13 years before the American with Disabilities Act, Kitty Cone and other disability rights activists occupied a federal building in San Francisco. They demanded the government protect their rights.

Because of Her Story presents a YouTube miniseries where students speak with Smithsonian curators about four women who shaped American history and culture. In How Did Kitty Cone Change Disability Rights?, Ren, a student, speaks with Katherine Ott, curator at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, about why Cone’s work matters.

See more YouTube videos from the Smithsonian American Women's History Initiative, Because of Her Story. #BecauseOfHerStory

Because Of Her Story
17
 

How did European colonization affect Native Americans?

#TeachingInquiry

Brandon Bates
11
 

How Did Angela Davis Inspire a Movement?

In 1970, activist Angela Davis was charged with murder. A movement arose to free her, and her time in jail Her time in jail inspired her to work to change the prison system. 

Because of Her Story presents a YouTube miniseries where students speak with Smithsonian curators about four women who shaped American history and culture. In How Did Angela Davis Inspire a Movement?, Kemi, a student, talks with Kelly Elaine Navies, oral historian at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture.

See more YouTube videos from the Smithsonian American Women's History Initiative, Because of Her Story.#BecauseOfHerStory

Because Of Her Story
22
 

How Did Angela Davis Inspire a Movement?

In 1970, activist Angela Davis was charged with murder. A movement arose to free her, and her time in jail Her time in jail inspired her to work to change the prison system. 

Because of Her Story presents a YouTube miniseries where students speak with Smithsonian curators about four women who shaped American history and culture. In How Did Angela Davis Inspire a Movement?, Kemi, a student, talks with Kelly Elaine Navies, oral historian at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture.

See more YouTube videos from the Smithsonian American Women's History Initiative, Because of Her Story.#BecauseOfHerStory

Juliana Arechaga
22
 

Houses

Images support learning in first grade "Dream House for My Family" lesson. For architecture puzzle activity, print selected images and cut them into pieces that focus on parts of the building. Allow table groups to work together to reassemble the house image and name the parts of the house.

Discuss images of model houses to introduce the lesson challenge: Create a 3-dimensional model of a dream house for your family.

Jean-Marie Galing
11
 

Homo floresiensis: Teaching Resources

This topical collection gathers resources related to Homo floresiensis, commonly known as the Flores “Hobbit." H. floresiensis, was discovered in 2003, making it the second most recently discovered early human species. Contains a video, websites, a 3D interactive tour, and articles.

Tess Porter
7
 

Historical Empathy with Archival Documents

Sierra Green, archivist at the Senator John Heinz History Center's Detre Library & Archives, conducted an online session highlighting multiple perspectives throughout history using materials from archival collections.

Archival materials can illuminate viewpoints at times overlooked in historical study, as they persist as remnants of individuals' voices in history. Included in this collection are facsimiles of materials from three local Pittsburgh stories.

Teachers can use these examples to examine history from the experiences of people who directly participated in those events.

Sierra Green
9
 

Historical Chinese Apothecary Exhibit of California Gold Rush Mining Town, at Columbia State Historic Park.

The population of California grew from 14,000 to 223,000 between the years of 1848 to 1852. During the California Gold Rush, people from different cultures migrated from all over the world, all sharing the same hopes of creating better lives for themselves and their families. The rich cultural diversity we find in California today can be traced back to many families from the earliest days of the State of California, through cultural artifacts. Columbia State Historic Park has the largest collection of gold rush brick buildings in California. This collection of 1850s gold rush era brick buildings is a living museum of cultural artifacts dated back to the diverse merchant economy that once thrived in Columbia, CA. During the gold rush, Columbia became one of the fifth largest cities in California, with one hundred and fifty businesses during the peak of Columbia's success. The Chinese population in Columbia owned a variety of different businesses; such as dry goods, boarding houses, laundry services, restaurants, and more. Originally, the Chinese population was located on the Western edge of town. In the late 1850s and 1860s, the Chinese began purchasing buildings from French merchants. The town's history of destructive fires and the rise and fall of the merchant economy shaped the reduction of the architectural landscape visitors find today, at Columbia State Historic Park. Many of the brick buildings survived it all and have been restored for visitors to enjoy today. Visitors of Columbia State Historic Park may view the Chinese Store exhibit through windows that display a large collection of Chinese artifacts. This collection of photos provides a closer look at the inside of the Chinese exhibit. Fong Yue Po, from the Yee Phong Herb Company, Sacramento, CA, donated many artifacts used in this exhibit.

columbiastatehistoricpark
16
 

Highlights Collection: Traditional Dance Videos

This is a Smithsonian Learning Lab topical collection, which contains images, text, and other multimedia resources that may complement the Tween Tribune feature, Misty Copeland is bringing "Ballet Across America." Use these resources to introduce or augment your study of this topic. If you want to personalize this collection by changing or adding content, click the Sign Up link above to create a free account.  If you are already logged in, click the copy button to initiate your own version. Learn more here

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
42
 

Highlights Collection: Skyscraper Design

This is a Smithsonian Learning Lab topical collection, which contains images, text, and other multimedia resources that may complement the Tween Tribune feature, Move over, steel: The high rises of tomorrow are "plyscrapers." Use these resources to introduce or augment your study of this topic. If you want to personalize this collection by changing or adding content, click the Sign Up link above to create a free account.  If you are already logged in, click the copy button to initiate your own version. Learn more here


Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
30
 

Highlights Collection: National Oceans Month (June) Learning Resources

This is a Smithsonian Learning Lab topical collection, which contains images, text, and other multimedia resources that may complement the Tween Tribune feature, Coastal cities need to rethink how they deal with rising waters. Use these resources to introduce or augment your study of this topic. If you want to personalize this collection by changing or adding content, click the Sign Up link above to create a free account.  If you are already logged in, click the copy button to initiate your own version. Learn more here


Ashley Naranjo
26
 

Highlights Collection: Mystery Learning Resources

This is a Smithsonian Learning Lab topical collection, which contains images, text, and other multimedia resources that may complement the Tween Tribune feature, Without Edgar Allan Poe, we wouldn't have Sherlock Holmes. Use these resources to introduce or augment your study of this topic. If you want to personalize this collection by changing or adding content, click the Sign Up link above to create a free account.  If you are already logged in, click the copy button to initiate your own version. Learn more here

Ashley Naranjo
36
 

Highlights Collection: Invention and Innovation

This is a Smithsonian Learning Lab topical collection, which contains images, text, and other multimedia resources that may complement the Tween Tribune feature, How a children's toy could help fight malaria. Use these resources to introduce or augment your study of this topic. If you want to personalize this collection by changing or adding content, click the Sign Up link above to create a free account.  If you are already logged in, click the copy button to initiate your own version. Learn more here

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
33
 

Highlights Collection: Bird and Insect Habitat Videos

This is a Smithsonian Learning Lab topical collection, which may contain images, text, and other multimedia resources created to complement this Tween Tribune issue. Use these resources to introduce or augment your study of this topic. If you want to personalize this collection, visit the Learning Lab homepage (learninglab.si.edu) and sign up for a free account. This will allow you to copy the collection and adapt it for your own purposes. Learn more here: https://learninglab.si.edu/create


Michelle Smith
11
 

Highlights Collection: Astronomy Learning Resources

This is a Smithsonian Learning Lab topical collection, which contains images, text, and other multimedia resources that may complement the Tween Tribune feature, Barns are painted red because of the physics of dying stars. Use these resources to introduce or augment your study of this topic. If you want to personalize this collection by changing or adding content, click the Sign Up link above to create a free account.  If you are already logged in, click the copy button to initiate your own version. Learn more here


Ashley Naranjo
30
 

Hawaiian Monarchs

This topical collection includes resources related to the eight monarchs of the Kingdom of Hawaii.  In order of succession, the monarchs are: Kamehameha I (r. 1810 - 1819); Kamehameha II (r. 1819 - 1824); Kamehameha III (r. 1825 -  1854); Kamehameha IV (r. 1855 - 1863); Kamehameha V (r. 1863 - 1872); Lunalilo (r. 1873 - 1874); Kalākaua (r. 1874 - 1891); and Liliʻuokalani (r. 1891 - 1893).  

The Kingdom of Hawaii was established as a constitutional monarchy in 1810 by King Kamehameha I.  In 1893, a coup led by American businessmen driven by sugar and pineapple business interests in the Hawaiian islands overthrew Queen Lili'uokalani.  Despite native protests and Lili'uokalani's efforts to reclaim the throne, the United States annexed Hawaii as a territory in 1898.  Hawaii became an American state in 1959.

This collection is not comprehensive but rather provides a launching point for further research and study.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.

Keywords: Kamamalu, Emma, Kapi'olani, Kapiolani, Kalakaua, Liliuokalani, Hawaiian, royals, royalty

#APA2018

Tess Porter
37
 

guns and stuff used in the American revolution

a collection of guns

David Marchant
10
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