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Found 541 Collections

 

Irish Music

This collection includes a wide range of Irish contemporary and traditional music in the Smithsonian collections, with two lesson plans for grades 3-5 from the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage.

#SmithsonianMusic

Philippa Rappoport
15
 

Irish Music

This collection includes a wide range of Irish contemporary and traditional music in the Smithsonian collections, with two lesson plans for grades 3-5 from the Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage.

#SmithsonianMusic

Robin McLaurin
15
 

Investigating the Life of Enslaved People Through Artifacts

In this collection, you will examine artifacts, paintings and text that gives you a window into the life of enslaved people of the US during 1700s and 1800s. I created this content as a way for my 4th grade students to dig deeper in their understanding of enslaved people beyond what our textbook provides. The students are asked to take meaningful analysis of the artifacts and to consider what further inquiries they have. 

#goglobal

While you navigate through this collection, consider:

See Think Wonder Thinking Routine

  • What do you see?
  • What do you think?
  • What do you wonder?

Main, Side, Hidden

  • What is the main story?
  • What is the side story?
  • What is the hidden story?

Unveiling Stories Thinking Routine

  • What is the main story?
  • What is the human story?
  • What is the world (issues) story?
  • What is the new story?
  • What is the untold story?
Ellen Rogers
27
 

Investigating Clean Water

In this collection, originally used with 4th graders, students investigate how people access clean water both globally and locally. Students will use Agency by Design thinking routines to explore watersheds as a system, focusing on the Anacostia Watershed & the larger Chesapeake Bay Watershed. They will then use observational drawings and make their own model watershed to deepen their understanding. 

Students will use Project Zero Thinking Routines to take the perspective of those who live in water scarce areas and be invited to conduct their own research of a region that faces physical or economic water scarcity. Students will be encouraged to take action by creating a public service announcement explaining an issue related to clean water or by designing their own solution.

This collection contains 10 images of showing the gathering, carrying, filtering of, and lack of clean water. It has maps that show water scarcity on a global scale, and maps and diagrams of local (to Washington, D.C.) watersheds. It contains several thinking routines that can be used to examine the works as well as guide students to notice complexity. It also contains links to several articles, videos and an interactive game that students can use to  conduct research on issues of water scarcity. 


#GoGlobal 


Marissa Werner
36
 

Inventing Scotland

What makes something Scottish and who decides this? Using the Smithsonian archives this collection features a range of objects and images, some traditionally Scottish and some less so, and asks students to consider how we represent countries and what problems that can present. See 'Information' button for lesson plans.

Amy Johnstone
35
 

Introduction to Primary and Secondary Sources

In this activity, students will learn about the differences between primary and secondary sources by comparing and analyzing different resources from the U.S. Civil Rights Movement

This collection provides ideas and strategies on how to spark discussions in the classroom about these types of resources, focusing primarily on students' interpretations of resources found here in Smithsonian Learning Lab.

Students will examine three different types of sources (documents, images, and objects). The activity consists of the following:

  •  In small groups, have your class examine the primary source, and have them summarize and report on its content, and discuss its strengths and limitations
  • For each primary source, review the groups' responses as a class.  
  • Then, have each group analyze the corresponding secondary source. Have them spot the differences between the primary and secondary source, and evaluate the reasons for using a primary source versus a secondary source. 
    • The primary and secondary sources in this collection focus on the same topic (the documents are about the Black Panther Party, the images feature Marian Anderson, and the objects relate to Rosa Parks)
  • Near the end of the collection is the students' task to sort through sources to identify which are primary vs. secondary sources.  
  • The final activity will call on students to reflect on the information that they have learned from the collection and ask them to think about how they would categorize digital resources  such as texts and tweets as either primary or secondary.

This collection and activity is based on the “Engaging Students with Primary Sources” guide from Smithsonian’s History Explorer, which can be found here: https://historyexplorer.si.edu/sites/default/files/PrimarySources.pdf. The guide is also included at the end of the collection, and can be used to develop other activities and/or collections on the topic of primary and secondary resources.


Alexander Graves
18
 

Introducing Hokusai: Mad about Painting

This Learning Lab Collection introduces three themes from the Hokusai:  Mad about Painting exhibition and provides works of art, classroom activities, and discussion questions associated with each theme. 

Tags:  #AsiaTeachers; Be a Reporter; customs; daily life; dragons; Edo; Great Wave; Hokusai; Japan; nature; New Year; personification; poetry; power; Project Zero; Mount Fuji; See Think Wonder; Step Inside; symbols; thunder; woodblock print

About the exhibition:

Hokusai:  Mad about Painting
November 23, 2019–November 8, 2020
Freer Gallery of Art, galleries 5–8

The Japanese artist Katsushika Hokusai (1760–1849) is widely recognized for a single image—Great Wave Off the Coast of Kanagawa, an icon of global art—yet he produced thousands of works throughout his long life. Charles Lang Freer recognized the artist’s vast abilities before many other collectors, and he assembled the world’s largest collection of paintings, sketches, and drawings by Hokusai. In commemoration of the centennial of Freer’s death in 1919, and in celebration of the Summer Olympics in Tokyo in 2020, the Freer Gallery presents a yearlong exploration of the prolific career of Katsushika Hokusai. Works large and small are on view, from six-panel folding screens and hanging scrolls to paintings and drawings. Also included are rare hanshita-e, drawings for woodblock prints that were adhered to the wood and frequently destroyed in the process of carving the block prior to printing. Among the many featured works are Hokusai’s manga, his often-humorous renderings of everyday life in Japan. Together, these works reveal an artistic genius who thought he might finally achieve true mastery in painting—if he lived to the age of 110.


Freer and Sackler Galleries
25
 

Interacting with Our Environment: Whose Home Is It?

Photos and paintings of Algonquin Provincial Park are grouped with Tom Uttech's "Mamakadendagwad."  What is the impact when someone or something enters an environment or ecosystem?  Lesson could be an introduction for multiple content areas.  In science, students could study mammals, birds, and insects of Ontario, Canada; ecosystems; and invasive species. In history, what is the wilderness? It could be paired with Charle C. Mann's argument about Native American and European impact on land in Jamestown.  It could also be paired with Juane Quick-to-See Smith's painting "State Names" to consider how humans name places they settle.  English students could extend the discussion by reading Iroquois creation myths and Joseph Bruchac's "Snapping Turtle."  #SAAMteach

Deborah Howe
13
 

Intangible Heritage through Material Culture: The Journey of an Ecuadorian Boat Seat

This teaching collection helps students to look closely and think critically by exploring an Ecuadorian boat seat, the first object donated to the National Museum of African History and Culture, and how this tangible object represents the survival and transmission of intangible cultural heritage in the African diaspora. The seat belonged to Débora Nazareno, a descendant of enslaved Africans in Ecuador, and is engraved with Anansi, a popular spider figure in West African folklore. The boat seat was gifted to the museum by her grandson, Juan Garcia Salazar, a renowned Esmeraldan historian. 

Included here are the objects itself, a bilingual video with curator Ariana Curtis, two suggested Thinking Routines - "See, Think, Wonder" and "Unveiling Stories" - from Harvard's Project Zero Thinking and Global Thinking materials, and supporting digital content about the museum display, Maroon communities, Anansi, the oral tradition.

For use in Social Studies, Spanish, English, and American History classes

#LatinoHAC 

Philippa Rappoport
19
 

Industry, Technology, and Progress in the 19th Century

Integrating portraiture can be a great way to activate what students have learned about a person, an event, or a moment in time. This collection explores the second industrial revolution (circa 1865-1915) which brought forth new ideas for manufacturing and technology. Below is a brief snapshot of the businesspeople and thought leaders who shaped the economy and redefined economic and social class conditions in the mid-late 19th century. 

Guiding questions:

Who are the notable businesspeople and inventors of the second industrial revolution?

How did the second industrial revolution pave the way for entrepreneurs in the early 20th century?

What were some of the socio-economic impacts of the second industrial revolution? 


#NPGTeach 

Ashleigh Coren
38
 

Industrial Revolution

  • Industrial Revolution, in modern history, the process of change from an agrarian and handicraft economy to one dominated by industry and machine manufacturing. This process began in Britain in the 18th century and from there spread to other parts of the world. Although used earlier by French writers, the term Industrial Revolution was first popularized by the English economic historian Arnold Toynbee (1852–83) to describe Britain’s economic development from 1760 to 1840. Since Toynbee’s time the term has been more broadly applied.
Alejandra Diaz
2
 

Impressionism

Impressionism, an art movement that began in France and was most prevalent from approximately 1872-1892, was an innovative and important precursor to several different art styles. It focused on capturing everyday scenes, changing light, and moments of motion. Forerunners of this movement include artists such as Édouard Manet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Claude Monet, and Edgar Degas.

Characteristics of Impressionism include quick and non-blended brush strokes, occasional unmixed colors, and an overall appearance of the "impression" of a situation-- not necessarily a fully rendered, academic image.

[All images in this collection have been personally uploaded from and credited to Wikimedia Commons.]

Alexander Falone
42
 

Immigration & The Face of American Identity

This collection provides resources that can be used to introduce and discuss the following essential questions, as part of a larger "American Identity" literature-based unit:  

1) In what ways do immigrants change America?

2) What would America be like without immigrants?

3) How do immigrants' experiences contribute to a complex and multifaceted American Identity?

#SAAMteach

Joanna Dickinson
13
 

Immigrant Literature

art used for 12th grade literature class

Katie Belanger
3
 

Imagery and Causes of the American Revolution

Essential Questions:

  1. How can we learn about history through a political cartoon or artifact?
  2. What were the causes and events leading up to the American Revolution?

This lesson is designed as an introduction to the causes of the American Revolution. Students will use primary sources (political cartoons, historical artwork, etc.) to identify some key historical events and the feelings of both the colonists and the British during and as a result of these events. 

Anticipatory set:

Choose either the Claim, Support, Question or the See, Think, Wonder thinking routine to begin the discussion of the "Join or Die" political cartoon. Once students have taken the time to look closely at the image, discuss the symbolism, the creator, and the implications of the French and Indian War on the American Revolution. 

Looking Closely:

Explain that students will break into groups to look closely at an image that has to do with an event leading up to the beginning of the American Revolution. Students can either continue to use the thinking routine you modeled in the anticipatory set, or they can use the Reporter's Notebook routine. Give students ample time to look closely at the image and notice the details, looking specifically for clues in titles and symbolism. Alternatively, the students could use the Cartoon Analysis Worksheet developed by the National Archives to notice and name some of the details in the images. If students are using the Reporter's Notebook thinking routine, have them complete only the facts and feelings section at this point. 

Once students have had time to explore their image, create a timeline of events with the images as a class, reading about and discussing each one. Once students have additional information about the event, the should complete the report at the bottom of the Reporter's Notebook organizer using additional details from the text. 

Closing/Assessment:

Students will complete a gallery walk of the images with the reports written by the students. After reading the reports and looking again at each image, students will create a headline for the report, capturing the most important aspect of the event.

Lara Grogan
16
 

Image Analysis: "Girl at Gee's Bend, Alabama" by Arthur Rothstein

Developing an inquiry-based strategy to support students can allow them to investigate objects and images as historians do. In this example, students try to reveal the story behind the image. They raise questions for their own further research. Because the image has only a title, the photographer's name, the "sitter"'s name, the place and the date, students have to rely on their own analysis of evidence in the image, rather than someone else's interpretation. When they read the expert's analysis, they will have already considered many of the elements that the expert highlights and can compare their interpretations.

"Girl at Gee's Bend, Alabama" is a provocative photograph that can be used in discussions ranging from history of the South during the Great Depression, to social justice.

Ashley Naranjo
3
 

Identity and Community--The Brownstone, Harvey Dinnerstein, 1958-1960

Harvey Dinnerstein’s The Brownstone depicts multicultural individuals who come together to form a community in New York during the 1950s.

Throughout the year, themes in literature come back to identity and community. Using The Brownstone, students will complete a variety of activities to explore these two ideas. After the first introductory activity, subsequent activities focus on literary concepts such as perspective, characterization, poetry, theme, purpose, and setting. These activities will include additional art and literary works. Ideas are explored through discussion and writing. 

#SAAMteach 

Helene Redmond
11
 

Ideas to Solutions with Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

How do you help students test their ideas in your classroom? A critical step in the design process, prototyping and testing ideas helps problem-solvers learn from failures, experiment with materials, and visualize their solutions. Educators will dive into a case study from Michael Graves Architecture and Design and explore various techniques to experiment with ideas in the classroom with resources from professional designers and Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum.

#NTOY18 #CHEDUCATION #CHDESIGNTHINKING

#designthinking

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
43
 

Iconic Pittsburgh Images, Paired with Project Zero Routines

Includes iconic people, places, and things associated with Pittsburgh. 

Prior to the workshop series, select one resource from this collection and conduct an adapted See-Wonder-Connect routine (What do you see in the resource that's worth noticing? What do you wonder about? What connections do you make to it?). You may consider sharing with a partner, using the Think-Pair-Share routine. Finally, Imagine if... you were using one of these resources in your own practice, what would you have students do with it? 

This collection was created for the Smithsonian Learning Lab workshops in Pittsburgh and the surrounding school districts. Funded by the Grable Foundation and in partnership with the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, the Quaker Valley School district and the Washington International School. 

#PZPGH

Ashley Naranjo
45
 

IB Biology Topic 1

Images in this collection represent the Nature of Science (NOS) learning statements found in each of the Topic 1 (cell biology) subtopics of the IB Biology curriculum (2016).   The images and descriptions can be used as an introductory activity to illustrate the depth, variation and cultural relevancy of biological discovery and technological advancement that is part of the IB Biology course.  Or, the images could serve as a revision activity before the end of course exam; students pair the image to the corresponding NOS learning statement. 

Gretel von Bargen
8
 

I've Fallen, and I Can't Get Up

This collection deals with individuals who were ordinary, rose to greatness, and then his/her life was reduced to less than ordinary. This collection will be used with the focus novel, Flowers for Algernon, as well as short stories, poems, and non fiction texts. The initial theme of the unit is FEAR and how we deal with it. These individuals were without fear or possessed the ability to mute that fear even though it cost all of them in the end.  This unit will be used to compare the character arc of Charley from the book to their choice of artwork and the subject's journey. This collection was created in conjunction with the National Portrait Gallery's 2018 Learning to Look Summer Teacher Institute. #NPGteach

Lisa Byrd
27
 

How Planes Fly

This is an introduction to the lesson series to Canvas vs. Aluminum planes. In this collection, students will be looking at different types of planes and how planes fly. The first resource is a video with Peter Jackson and learning how to fly a WWI airplane. The next four slides are different types of planes. The first two are planes from WWI and the second two are planes from WWII. The last resource is an external link to NASA's resource on the importance of the Forces of Flight meaning drag, lift, thrust, and weight. It also talks about the different dynamics of flight.  

Kaitlin Kim
6
 

How has our view of Thomas Jefferson changed over time?

Thomas Jefferson is remembered for his contributions to the ideals of natural rights and democratic principles.  Yet, as a slave owner,  Jefferson personally lived in contradiction of those  principles. In this Learning Lab you'll explore how Thomas Jefferson is viewed at different times in history through portraiture. Using evidence from his portraits you'll answer the question, "How has our view of Thomas Jefferson changed over time."

Dave Klippel
3
 

How has our view of Thomas Jefferson changed over time?

Thomas Jefferson is remembered for his contributions to the ideals of natural rights and democratic principles.  Yet, as a slave owner,  Jefferson personally lived in contradiction of those  principles. In this Learning Lab you'll explore how Thomas Jefferson is viewed at different times in history through portraiture. Using evidence from his portraits you'll answer the question, "How has our view of Thomas Jefferson changed over time."

Laura Nicosia
3
265-288 of 541 Collections