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Oral history interview with W. McNeil Lowry, 1981 Oct. 19-1982 Apr. 12

Archives of American Art
Transcript (1981) 123 pages.

Transcript (1982) 106 pages.

An interview of W. McNeil Lowry conducted 1981 Oct. 19-1982 Apr. 12, by R. W. Daum, for the Archives of American Art.

Oral history interview with Mischa Richter, 1994 September 27-28

Archives of American Art
3 sound cassettes 2 hr., 43 min.) : analog.

Transcript: 54 pages

An interview with Mischa Richter conducted 1994 September 27-28, by Robert F. Brown, for the Archives of American Art.

Richter tells of his life as the only child of a prosperous Jewish family in Kharkov, Ukraine, where he showed early precocity in drawing. He remembers the Russian Revolution, being taken to Poland in 1921, and then in 1922 to New York and Boston. He discusses his education in Boston, including drawing lessons with Harold Zimmerman at which he got to know Hyman Bloom and Jack Levine; and classes at the Museum School in Boston from 1929 to 1930.

He speaks of his long-time friendship with Will Barnet, attending Yale School of Fine Arts, 1930-1934, and painting a WPA mural for the Boston Boys Club in 1935. He remembers meeting Will Steig, deciding to become a cartoonist, and selling enough drawings to leave the WPA to work as art editor for "The New Masses," where he became close friends with Ad Reinhardt. He discusses becoming a contract cartoonist in 1940 for "The New Yorker;" his avoidance of art dealers, because they demand steady production yet have no known goals, unlike a magazine; his abhorrence of taking himself, or others, too seriously; the perils of early success and the pettiness of many matters in the art community of Provincetown, Mass.; and the nature of his paintings.

Oral history interview with David Woodbury, 1977 July 1

Archives of American Art
1 sound file : digital, wav file

Transcript: 25 pages

An interview with David Woodbury conducted 1977 July 1, by Robert F. Brown, for the Archives of American Art. Woodbury speaks of his father, the painter Charles H. Woodbury.

Night Witches

National Air and Space Museum

Today (tonight?) we’re talking about a chilling chapter from flight history— Night Bomber Regiment 588. They were a group of about 80 Soviet women who flew combat missions during World War II. Led by famous Russian pilot Marina Raskova, these fearless aviatrixes would fly across German lines under cover of darkness and drop bombs from their WWII bi-planes, striking targets on the ground and terror in the hearts of their enemies. They became so feared by the German army that they were dubbed the die Nachthexen, or the Night Witches. This isn’t a lame Halloween story, this is badass history.

Adam Rippon's Olympic Mesh-capades

Smithsonian Institution

When professional athletes face the end of their career, many look ahead with uncertainty and wonder:
“What’s next?” But when Adam Rippon stood on the Olympic podium in 2018, making history as the first openly gay American to medal at the winter Olympics, he was sure about his next steps. Rippon was a darling of the American Olympic media, entering all of his interviews ready with a joke and a willingness to
speak candidly about his personal journey. In this episode, Rippon brings that same attitude to Sidedoor, talking about his Olympic costume, fame, and the male private part that we didn’t realize was private.

Costanoan Sound Recording OCT 1929

National Anthropological Archives
Digital audio file produced from 1/4" open reel tape copy.

FM SC CL

Disc Note:BAE Lr Harrington 07 Oct 1929

COS CT1, 6 MINS, 7.50IPS

Aluminum disc

Ventureño and Island Chumash Sound Recording

National Anthropological Archives
Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Shellac disc

Side 1: Man translating Ventureño into English; Side 2: Vocabulary with Santa Cruz dialect to English, given to man by Mr. Callenburg/Cowdenburg in employ of the Smithsonian Institute, to compare with Ventureño (audio speeds up throughout side)

Ventureño Sound Recording

National Anthropological Archives
Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Discs were originally housed in the National Archives as part of Record Group 106 (Records of the Smithsonian Institution, 1871-1952). On March 18, 2005, they were returned to the Smithsonian Institution as SIA Acc. 05-142 and in 2010 the records were transferred to the National Anthropological Archives and added to the J.P. Harrington Collection.

Shellac disc

Side 1: "First verse of Hiawatha in Chumash Dialect, translated by Candelaria from Spanish into Ventureno Indian dialect, written by Georgia Henley, December 15, 1912"; man translating Ventureño into English. Side 2: man translating Ventureño into English.

Ventureño Sound Recording

National Anthropological Archives
Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Shellac disc

Sides 1 and 2: Translating Ventureño into English.

Ventureño Sound Recording

National Anthropological Archives
Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Shellac disc

Sides 1 and 2: Translating Ventureño into English.

Oral history interview with Irving Marantz, 1968 August 31

Archives of American Art
1 sound file (50 min.); digital, wav

Transcript: 23 pages

An interview with Irving Marantz conducted 1968 August 31, by Dorothy Seckler, for the Archives of American Art.

Oral history interview with Virginia Cuthbert, 1995 August 28

Archives of American Art
1 sound cassette (90 min.) : analog.

Transcript: 40 pages

An interview of Virginia Cuthbert conducted 1995 August 28, by Robert F. Brown, for the Archives of American Art, in Cuthbert's home, Buffalo, New York.

Virginia Cuthbert discusses her family background in the Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania area; and her father's love of art and acquaintance with Homer Saint-Gaudens, Director of the Carnegie Museum of Art; her very early art education and, later, her study in Europe on a Syracuse University fellowship; her brief study with Felice Carena in Florence and critiques of her work in London by Augustus John and Colin Gill; her study and friendship in New York with George Luks and the beginning of a long friendship with the composer, Virgil Thompson; graduate study in fine arts at the University of Pittsburgh; her engagement to the future museum director, Andrew Ritchie, its breaking-off, and her marriage to Philip Elliott; her further study at the Carnegie Institute with Alexander Kostellow; and a sketching trip to France and Spain.

Oral history interview with John Coolidge, 1989 March 7-29

Archives of American Art
21 sound files : digital, wav file

Transcript: 148 pages

An interview with John Coolidge conducted 1989 March 7-29, by Robert F. Brown, for the Archives of American Art.

Volta Laboratory Experimental Recording

National Museum of American History
This is an experimental sound recording made in the Volta Laboratory, Washington, D.C., on 11 March 1885. The recording process involved focusing a beam of light, projecting it through a liquid, and causing sound waves to interrupt both the light and the liquid to expose a prepared photographic plate. The recording, which starts at the center and spirals outward, is of variable density, that is the areas of exposure vary in density according to volume and pitch of the sound recorded. Process is described in U.S. Patent 341,213 awarded Alexander Graham Bell, Chichester A. Bell, and Charles Sumner Tainter on 4 May 1886. Sound was recovered from this recording in 2011. Content summary: “Mary had a little lamb” Content transcript (37 seconds): “ [?]…Sumner Tainter and H. G. Rogers. This eleventh day of March, eighteen hundred and eighty-five. [trilled r sound] [indistinct phrase] Mary had a little lamb, and its fleece was white as snow [alternatively, black as soot?] . And wherever Mary went…Oh [indistinct word]. Mary had a little lamb, and its fleece was white as snow [alternatively, black as soot?]. And wherever Mary went, the little lamb was sure to go. How is this for high? [trill]” References: Patrick Feaster, “A Discography of Volta Laboratory Recordings at the National Museum of American History” Leslie J. Newville, “Development of the Phonograph at Alexander Graham Bell's Volta Laboratory,” in Contributions from the Museum of History and Technology, United States National Museum Bulletin 218, Paper 5 (1959): 69-79. Steven E. Schoenherr, “Charles Sumner Tainter and the Graphophone,” Wile, Raymond R. "The Development of Sound Recording at the Volta Laboratory," Association for Recorded Sound Collections Journal 21, No. 2, 1990, pp. 208-225.

Experimental Sound Recording, Disc Layers of Cardboard, Plaster and Foil

National Museum of American History
This is an experimental sound recording made in the Volta Laboratory, Washington, D.C. In a ring around the center, it is marked with the initials for Sumner Tainter, one of the Volta Laboratory Associates, and a date: “S.T. Dec. 29th 1881.” This recording was copied from an 1881 master at an unknown later date. Sound was recovered from this recording in 2013. Content transcript: “…[indistinct] I am a magnetical graphophone. What are you? To be, or not to be: that is the question. [trilled r sounds] How is that for high?” References: Patrick Feaster, “A Discography of Volta Laboratory Recordings at the National Museum of American History” Leslie J. Newville, “Development of the Phonograph at Alexander Graham Bell's Volta Laboratory,” in Contributions from the Museum of History and Technology, United States National Museum Bulletin 218, Paper 5 (1959): 69-79.

Volta Laboratory Experimental Sound Recording, Green Wax on Brass Disc

National Museum of American History
This is an experimental sound recording made in the Volta Laboratory, Washington, D.C., about 1884. The wax, poured into a brass holder, has been dyed a bright green. Sound was recovered from this recording in 2011. Content summary: Hamlet’s soliloquy Content transcript (17 seconds): “To be, or not to be: that is the question. Whether it is nobler in the mind to suffer the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, or to take arms against a sea of troubles, and by opposing end them? To die, to sleep…” References: Patrick Feaster, “A Discography of Volta Laboratory Recordings at the National Museum of American History” Leslie J. Newville, “Development of the Phonograph at Alexander Graham Bell's Volta Laboratory,” in Contributions from the Museum of History and Technology, United States National Museum Bulletin 218, Paper 5 (1959): 69-79. Steven E. Schoenherr, “Charles Sumner Tainter and the Graphophone,” Wile, Raymond R. "The Development of Sound Recording at the Volta Laboratory," Association for Recorded Sound Collections Journal 21, No. 2, 1990, pp. 208-225.

Dream Blues; Lost Wandering Blues

National Museum of American History
Ma Rainey. side 1: Dream Blues; side 2: Lost Wandering Blues (Paramount 12098)

78 rpm

Finding Cleopatra

Smithsonian Institution

Edmonia Lewis was the first American woman of color to achieve international fame as a sculptor. Her 3,000-pound masterwork, “The Death of Cleopatra,” commemorated another powerful woman who broke with convention… and then the sculpture disappeared. On this episode of Sidedoor, we find them both.

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