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Sirige and kanaga masqueraders during the Dama ceremony, Sanga, Mali. [slide]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.

"The Dama rite of passage takes place over a six day period. The second day is Gondenu, the day of dancing, and is organized in three phases, the separation, the liminal, and the reintegration. The reintegration phase resolves the conflicts and re-establishes order. The kanaga and sirige are paired in this phase and create a symbolism of the balanced pairing of male and female aspects." [Harris M., 1989: Visual tropes: The Kanaga Mask of the Dogon People of West Africa, Yale University]. During his trip to Mali, Elisofon visited the Dogon people in Sanga (Sangha), a group of thirteen villages lying east of Bandiagara at the top of an escarpment. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for Life magazine and traveled to Africa from August 18, 1959 to December 20, 1959.

Minganji masqueraders, near Gungu, Congo (Democratic Republic), [slide]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.

"Although the Minganji face masks make an appearance at a wide variety of occasions (such as the investiture ritual of a local chief, or the construction of a new chief's residence), their primary role is as guardian of the initiation encampement. The Gitenga mask is described as the grandfather or the chief of the Miganji. It serves as a representation of the sun, a symbol of life and regeneration. The Gitenga mask thus stands in diametrical opposition to the other Minganji characters, which embody death, uncertainty, and darkness." [Petridis C., 1993: Pende Masks styles. Face of the Spirits]. During his trip to Congo (now Democratic Republic of Congo), Elisofon visited Gungu and its surroundings in Pende people's region. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon traveled to Africa from March 17, 1970 to July 17, 1970.

Arkansas, from the United States Series

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Belgian Village (Chicago Fair, 1933)

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Tide Marshes

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Pharmacist

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Fuse, from the suite Stoned Moon

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Trees along Stream in Fall

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Block House, Alaska, 1887

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Lake Winnipesaukee

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Plant Study

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Corn

Smithsonian American Art Museum

(Homage to Tobey, portfolio) The Awakening-Night

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Chandelier (one of a pair)

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Perennial Phlox (Phlox paniculata)

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Western Hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla)

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Healer selling his wares on street corner, Lagos, Nigeria. [slide]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.

This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for Life magazine and traveled to Africa from August 18, 1959 to December 20, 1959.

Hindu Merchants

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Dox Trash

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Kalorama

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Portrait of a Lady

Smithsonian American Art Museum

Joint canoeing to the fish-traps in the cataracts, near Kisangani, Congo (Democratic Republic), [slide]

Eliot Elisofon Photographic Archives
Title is provided by EEPA staff based on photographer's notes.

"The Wagenia derive their fame as fisherman from the way in which they have turned the opportunities offered them by their natural environment to account. At the point where they live, the river narrows considerably and drops in a series of rapids and cataracts over a several metres high, hard rocky ledge which appears above the surface here. A special attraction for tourists is the way the Wagenia manoeuvre their canoes through the rapids and the acrobatic feats they perform when emptying the conical, 2 to 5-metre long fish-traps suspended in the rapids from structures of thick beams. The regattas which the Wagenia hold with the biggest of their canoes in honour of important guests are also famous." [Droogers A., 1980: The Dangerous Journey, Symbolic Aspects of Boys' Initiation among the Wagenia of Kisangani, Zaire. Mouton Publishers, The Hague]. During his trip to Congo (now Democratic Republic of Congo), Elisofon visited the Boyoma Falls near Kisangani. This photograph was taken when Eliot Elisofon was on assignment for Life magazine and traveled to Africa from August 18, 1959 to December 20, 1959.

Bowl

Smithsonian American Art Museum
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