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Found 363 Collections

 

The Universe: An Introduction

Explore the observable universe. Think about the size of space and where we fit in.

This lesson features an issue of Smithsonian in Your Classroom, Minecraft: Education Edition extensions, and is part of the 2017 Museum Day Live! STEM Challenge.

DOWNLOAD THE PDF TO COMPLETE THIS LESSON.

Museum Day Live!
12
 

Marine ecosystems

cameron harris
5
 

I3 Marine Environments

Joshua Morris
24
 

i3 - Marine Ecosystems

Angelita F
7
 

Lockheed SR-71 Blackbird

Built of titanium, the SR-71 Blackbird is the world's fastest jet-propelled aircraft. The Blackbird's performance and operational achievements placed it at the pinnacle of aviation technology developments during the Cold War. In this episode of STEM in 30 we'll feature the SR-71 Blackbird on display at the Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center and explore why it was so important for reconnaissance.

March 16, 2016

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
12
 

A Sky Full of Color: Live from Albuquerque Balloon Fiesta

Balloons have a long and colorful history. After all, the first hot-air balloon passengers were a sheep, duck, and rooster who flew from France in 1783. Since then, balloons have been a mode of transportation, a military asset, and a source of entertainment for many. Join STEM in 30 as we come to you live from the Albuquerque Balloon Fiesta, bringing you the history of balloons, the science behind hot-air and gas balloons, and the pageantry of the Fiesta.

October 5, 2016

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
26
 

The Science of Landing a Really Fast Plane on a Really Big Boat

Landing a plane is difficult under normal circumstances. Imagine landing a super fast plane on a moving runway. Oh, and the runway is also very short! That's what it's like to land on an aircraft carrier. Not only is math and science required to do this, but there’s also the coordination of a massive crew of people who makes it happen. Learn about the math, science, and human element it takes to land on and launch off an aircraft carrier.

January 24, 2018

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
14
 

Marine Science Concepts Review

You can use this site to review for the common final exam that you will take at the end of the year. 

Ellen Doyle
1
 

IB Biology Topic 1

Images in this collection represent the Nature of Science (NOS) learning statements found in each of the Topic 1 (cell biology) subtopics of the IB Biology curriculum (2016).   The images and descriptions can be used as an introductory activity to illustrate the depth, variation and cultural relevancy of biological discovery and technological advancement that is part of the IB Biology course.  Or, the images could serve as a revision activity before the end of course exam; students pair the image to the corresponding NOS learning statement. 

Gretel von Bargen
8
 

Highlights Collection: Astronomy Learning Resources

This is a Smithsonian Learning Lab topical collection, which contains images, text, and other multimedia resources that may complement the Tween Tribune feature, Barns are painted red because of the physics of dying stars. Use these resources to introduce or augment your study of this topic. If you want to personalize this collection by changing or adding content, click the Sign Up link above to create a free account.  If you are already logged in, click the copy button to initiate your own version. Learn more here


Ashley Naranjo
30
 

Samuel Langley, Solar Scientist

Samuel Langley was the director of the Allegheny Observatory very near the city of Pittsburgh. Langley focused his telescope on the sun each clear day hoping to find its secrets and energy output.

Arthur Glaser
21
 

George Catlin: Lives of the Plains Indians

Long before the camera went west, artists like George Catlin were preserving the images of the native Americans on the western plains. Catlin's paintings are numerous and divide into two genre: the group activities and portraiture. This learning lab focuses on group activities of many plains indians including hunting, traditional dances, and recreation.

Arthur Glaser
32
 

Jamestown: Challenge for Survival

The early years in Virginia's first colony were fraught with starvation and illness. Many of the Jamestown colonists were not "survivors". Most were gentlemen searching for gold and riches and had no experience living in the wilderness. America was a challenge: the forest primeval had never been cut, there was no available farmland, few had experience at fishing or hunting and gathering. Our story about tells about the ultimate in desperation.

Arthur Glaser
31
 

Communication

How do you communicate? Through words? Body language? A facial expression? Explore the different ways people and animals communicate.

Maureen Leary
8
 

Keeping Ageing Technology Alive

Students will explore issues curators face to keep technology working to display artworks through looking at Nam June Paik’s work. Known as the father of video art, Nam June Paik used Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) televisions as a canvas for this artwork. Students will learn about the properties of the CRT-televisions that are vital for Paik’s work to be shown.  Students will use the graphing application Desmos to make predictions on how many CRT TVs are needed to keep Paik’s work on display so people around the world can enjoy it in person.  

This activity is designed for students to work in groups of 2-3 people. For the Desmos part of the activity, the teacher will need to make a copy of the activity and share it with his/her students so the teacher can access the students' work. The teacher can decide to use the Desmos portion of the activity with the students working in groups or individually. 


After looking at Nam June Paik's work students will explore Bill Viola's work with Plasma screens TVs as a canvas and problem solve how to adapt his work of the technology to keep it on display for years to come. 

Day 1: Slides 1-7 

Day 2 (or extension): Slides 8-10 

Extra resources: Slides 11-13


Student InstructionsTeacher instructions 

Slide 1: Nam June Paik Archive

Read the background information on Nam June Paik and the curator John G. Hanhadt

Slide 2: Thinking Routine description of Parts, Purpose, Complexities.

Read instructions

Make sure that the students choose one of the pieces to answer questions on slide 4

Slide 3: Electronic Superhighway

Student mode

In groups of 2-3 students will go through the Thinking routine

Parts, Purposes, Complexity

See Instructions allow students to share their observations.  

Slide 4: Megatron/Matrix

Student mode

In groups of 2-3 students will go through the Thinking routine

Parts, Purposes, Complexity

See Instructions allow students to share their observations.  

Slide 5: Cathode Ray Tube for Television

Go through the hotspots on the CRT, and watch the 5 min video on CRT, explaining the science behind

You can also have the students read more history on the inventors.

The history of TV

Electronic Dictionary


Slide 6: First TV RCA 630-TS

Data on the life span of RCA televisions, possibly looking at the amount of Samsung TVs that are needed for Nam June’s artwork.


“Life span and time that it can be used.

Replacement components

Back up CRTs

Commercial use

20k working hours”

Smithsonian Presentation of Paik's work

Slide 7: Desmos activity

Students can go to the interactive desmos link, the teacher will have to provide a class code to record the student work. 

Teachers will have to make a copy of this activity and sign into desmos using google or creating an account. 

Slide 8: Bill ViolaRead information on Bill Viola and watch videos of his work.
Slide 9: Thinking routine instructionsLook at his work, students can also look up the video versions of the work. Imagine if… in the context of how the technology might be altered or the artwork will have to altered to keep the art on display at museums. Agency by Design Imagine if Thinking Routine

Slide 10: Bill VIola's Fall into Paradise
Extra resources
Slide 11: 
Video "Nam June Paik: Art & Process- presented by John G Hanhardt"
Slide 12:Video on "Conserving and Exhibiting the Works of Nam June Paik: Joanna Phillips"
Slide 13: Desmos teacher guide


The last two slides are extra material for the teacher or the students if they are interested in more of the conservation efforts involving Nam June Paik's work. 


Extensions:

Students could do research on emerging television technology to make a mathematical function that will predict when the plasma TV will be obsolete. 

Art project:

Students can design an art project that will be displayed using technology. They will have to write installation instructions and possible adaptations to their work for changing or aging technology. 

Amanda Riske
13
 

Interacting with Our Environment: Whose Home Is It?

Photos and paintings of Algonquin Provincial Park are grouped with Tom Uttech's "Mamakadendagwad."  What is the impact when someone or something enters an environment or ecosystem?  Lesson could be an introduction for multiple content areas.  In science, students could study mammals, birds, and insects of Ontario, Canada; ecosystems; and invasive species. In history, what is the wilderness? It could be paired with Charle C. Mann's argument about Native American and European impact on land in Jamestown.  It could also be paired with Juane Quick-to-See Smith's painting "State Names" to consider how humans name places they settle.  English students could extend the discussion by reading Iroquois creation myths and Joseph Bruchac's "Snapping Turtle."  #SAAMteach

Deborah Howe
13
 

Mummy Science - Natural and Cultural Preserved Remains

This Smithsonian Science How learning collection, from Q?rius at the National Museum of Natural History, is part of a distance learning program at http://qrius.si.edu/explore-science/webcast This collection focuses on the science of mummies. Targeted at middle schoolers, the collection invites students into an authentic understanding of how mummies form, both naturally and culturally. Physical and forensic anthropologist Dr. David Hunt is featured as an expert explainer. The collection includes an interactive webcast video with discussion questions, cross-cutting activities, an independent project, and other resources for teachers and students.

This collection was created to support the 2016 CCSSO Teachers of the Year Day at the Smithsonian.

Key Terms: physical anthropology, archaeology, skeletal remains, mummification, burial practices, decomposition, culture

Key Concepts:

Skeletal analysis for age, sex, ancestry, and health

Cultural burial practices over time

Chemical process of mummification

Scientific benefits of studying mummies

Technology used by physical anthropologists

Eric Albro
13
 

Stupendous Stelfox - a collection of his Hymenoptera field books & their transcriptions

The hymenoptera field books of Arthur Wilson Stelfox and links to their transcriptions completed in the Smithsonian Transcription Center.

Siobhan Leachman
12
 

Mosquitoes: Vectors for Zika, Malaria, and Yellow Fever

This topical collection examines mosquito-borne illnesses from the perspectives of art, history, public health, science, and visual thinking strategies. Specifically, the Zika virus and historic malaria and yellow fever are studied through the Smithsonian's national insect collection. Includes specimens and objects related to mosquitoes, as well as artworks and articles. 

Tracie Spinale
84
 

Innovation

The artist’s imagination may be limitless but his or her materials and tools available do place limitations. How can an artist put their knowledge to into practice, working around their limitations and learn more at the same time? Students will explore how some craft artists have to question the techniques and materials they use in order to create/use a new approach


Lillian Young
26
 

Voyage of Discovery: Lewis & Clark explore Louisiana.

Images related to the Corps of Discovery. Most people think of the Lewis and Clark Expedition as one of geographic exploration. However, President Jefferson charged them to study ethnography, biology, zoology, meteorology, botany and geology. They were required to make detailed maps of their travels and keep a journal about their experiences. Sculptures, paintings and other forms of artwork have been included to illustrate the many interpretations of Lewis and Clark.
Arthur Glaser
38
 

Rodman's Guns


The five years of the Civil War are quite rightly considered a period of ordnance and artillery experimentation, development, and transition. The work of one man led, in fact, to the casting of one of the biggest guns ever built, even to the present day--a monstrous 20-inch muzzzleloader that fired a 1000 pound solid shot

Arthur Glaser
16
 

Analyzing Emotions: An Exercise to Develop Emotional Intelligence

The collection includes a chart that briefly informs the viewer of the main areas of the brain and their functions. Also, it includes an image from the movie "Inside Out," to inspire the ways how a person could visualize emotion. The learning objective is for students to be able to have an understanding of what emotions and to become a more positive person. 

1. Go over the definition of emotion and look at the human brain chart to gain general information of the various parts of the brain.

2. On a piece of paper, write down the various emotions that you know and connect them with a personal daily action that you believe is relevant to that emotion (example: feeling happy when your pet greets you at the door). 

3. Using the response from the previous step, write a journal entry reflecting on how your daily negative actions could change and/or how you can continue the positive actions.

4. Use your responses to draw and cut out different  shapes from construction paper that represents your negative and positive emotions. 

4. After completing these steps, speak with a classmate some of the actions you are going to take to be a more positive person. 


Tags: brain; emotions; psychology; analysis

Samantha Castaneda
3
 

The Wright Stuff: Flying the Wright Flyer

The birth of aeronautical engineering began in the Wright brothers' bike shop in Dayton, Ohio. The family tree of airplanes can be traced back to the Wright brothers' 1903 Flyer. The principals of flight that got the Wrights into the air are the same today. Join STEM in 30 as we investigate the principals of flight and how the Wright Flyer made it into the air and into the history books.

December 14, 2016

STEM in 30 at National Air and Space Museum
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