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Oral history interview with Ferol Sibley Warthen, 1981 September 3

Archives of American Art
2 sound files : digital, wav file

An interview of Ferol Sibley Warthen conducted 1981 September 3, by Robert F. Brown, for the Archives of American Art.

Oral history interview with Gordon Bailey Washburn, 1977 March 1

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 94 pages

An interview of Gordon Bailey Washburn conducted 1977 March 1, by Virginia Field, for the Archives of American Art. Washburn speaks of his career in museums, with emphasis on his work as director of the Asia House Gallery.

Oral history interview with James W. Washington, Jr., 1987 June 29

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 90 pages

An interview of James W. Washington conducted 1987 June 29, by Paul Karlstrom, for the Archives of American Art.

Washington discusses his early life in the South; effects of discrimination and the formation of a world view; art as the embodiment of spiritual truth; concept of the Absolute in art; role of the imagination; discovering form in material as basis of sculpture; training and contacts in Seattle; Mark Tobey and Morris Graves; role of Mexico in his shift to sculpture; and philosophy and its realization in sculpture.

Oral history interview with Jeanne L. Wasserman, 1993-1994

Archives of American Art
5 sound cassettes (7 hrs., 30 min.) : analog.

Transcript: 125 p.

Interview of Jeanne L. Wasserman, conducted by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, in Cambridge, MA from January 28, 1993-July 19, 1994.

Wasserman speaks of her parents' cultural interests; first becoming interested in sculpture after visiting a Rodin exhibition in Paris with her family; visiting art galleries and studying painting in New York City as a young woman; her education at Fieldston and Radcliffe; trying to get a job in New York after college; working in advertising; meeting her husband, Max, and building a business with him; beginning to collect art; putting together a collection for the condominium project, 180 Beacon; the opening of 180 Beacon; working on a condominium project in the Virgin Islands; curating sculpture exhibitions at the Fogg Museum and at Wellesley; writing the catalogue for a Daumier exhibition at the Fogg; serving on the board of the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston; organizing forums on contemporary art with the Council of the Arts at MIT; becoming involved with Harvard's Institute for Learning in Retirement; and notable purchases of work by Daumier, Rodin, Degas, Giacometti, de Chirico, Nicolas Schöffer, Henry Moore, and others. Wasserman also recalls Alfred Stieglitz, Peppino Mangravite, Elie Nadelman, Hyman Swetzoff, Joseph Hirshhorn, Erica Brausen, René and Charles Gimpel, Louise Nevelson, Niki de Saint Phalle, Jean Tinguely, Robert Indiana, Claes Oldenburg, Denise René, Yaacov Agam, George Rickey, George Segal, David Ross, Milena Kalinovska, Jacques de Caso, Yulla Lipchitz, Vera List, Jim Cuno, and others.

Oral history interview with Jack Waters, 2018 February 21-22

Archives of American Art
Audio: 4 sound files (5 hr., 59 min.) digital, wav

Transcript: 72 pages.

An interview with Jack Waters, conducted 2018 February 21 and 22, by Alex Fialho, for the Archives of American Art's Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project, at the Visual AIDS office in New York, New York.

Waters speaks of his early exposure to the arts through his family and their frequent visitors and boarders; the beginnings of his political consciousness, race consciousness, sex consciousness, and self-identity during the 1960s; his dance education at the Miquon School in Philadelphia; teaching at Miquon after a briefly dancing in California; his dance and choreography education at the Julliard School and the Ailey School; his experience of the Lower East Side in the 1980s; the genesis and development of the Performing On One Leg collective; the start of the AIDS epidemic; collaborations with Gordon Kurtti and Brian Taylor, and their AIDS-related deaths; the importance of art-making and documentary practice during the AIDS epidemic; the beginning and development of his film and video work; collaborating with Peter Cramer on Black and White Study as both film and performance; receiving his HIV-positive diagnosis; the beginning and development of his work as a writer and journalist; his involvement in AIDS activist and queer activist organizations; a formative period in Ibiza during the fall 1983; his films The Male GaYze and Short Memory/No History; changes in queer activism he has observed since the 1980s, and the lack of historical memory about them; his experience of intergenerational queer dialogue; his involvement with Visual AIDS; and his thoughts on the idea of artistic legacy, both generally and in his particular case.

Oral history interview with Todd Webb, 1990 September 4-1992 May 22

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 57 pages

An interview of Todd Webb conducted 1990 September 4-1992 May 22, by Robert F. Brown, for the Archives of American Art. Webb speaks of his childhood in Detroit and Ontario, Canada; friendship with photographer Harry Callahan and the influence of a course by Ansel Adams on them both; service as a Navy photographer in World War II; development of a close friendship with Alfred Stieglitz and Georgia O'Keeffe during the late 1940s; photographic assignments with FORTUNE magazine for Standard Oil Company under Roy Stryker, and in England and France under Rene Leonhardt, a photo agency; writing and photographic essays on the American West; assignments in 1960s for the United Nations; sale, in the 1970s, of negatives and work to date to the collector George Rinhart; residence in Maine; and his frequent travels.

Oral history interview with Sande Webster, 1990 March 13-28

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 139 pages

An interview of Sande Webster conducted 1990 March 13-28, by Marina Pacini, for the Archives of American Art Philadelphia Project. Webster speaks of her background and education; her experiences working at the Berg Art Gallery, Jenkintown, Pennsylvania; opening the Wallnuts Gallery in Philadelphia, in 1969, with Meryl Aberman, Sari Robinson, and Denis Webster; the evolution of the gallery from its early years handling crafts, photographs, paintings and sculptures, and framing; changes in the gallery's exhibition philosophy over the years; the departure of the other partners which led to the change in name of the gallery to the Sande Webster Gallery; the opportunities for artists of color in Philadelphia, particularly through her gallery, and she describes the history and evolution of Recherché, a group of African-American artists who exhibit together to gain greater visibility for black artists, the commercial and critical response to the group, and to each of its members. She discusses the commercial and critical response to the group and each of its members. She comments upon the Philadelphia gallery scene and changes over the past twenty years.

Oral history interview with Wesley C. Wehr, 1983 May 26-September 22

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 109 pages

An interview of Wesley C. Wehr conducted 1983 May 26 - September 22, by Martha Kingsbury, for the Archives of American Art's Northwest Oral History Project in Seattle, Washington.

Wehr speaks of meeting the artists Morris Graves and Mark Tobey, their fame, their personalities and his relationship with them; his own background and education in music, poetry, paleobotany, and painting; the Seattle art scene and changes in it during the 1960s; and important Seattle collectors.

Oral history interview with Roswell Weidner, 1989 July 20-27

Archives of American Art
Transcript 134 pages

An interview of Roswell Weidner conducted 1989 July 20-27, by Marina Pacini, for the Archives of American Art Philadelphia Project. Weidner discusses his early life, education, and art training at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, first at the school at Chester Springs, and later at the main school in Philadelphia. He discusses the programs at both schools, and recalls some of the faculty members, including Roy Nuse, Albert Laessle, George Harding, Joseph Pierson, Francis Speight, Daniel Garber, and Henry McCarter. He discusses the courses, exhibitions, and the competitions for traveling scholarships. He also discusses his study at the Barnes Foundation with Violette De Mazia and Angelo Pinto. After leaving the Academy, he joined the National Youth Administration and then transferred to the WPA with the Museum Extension, the Painting Project and the Print Project. He speaks of his work for each of these programs, their administration, and some of the individuals involved including Dox Thrash. He recalls Mary Curran and the efforts made by Albert Barnes to have her removed as head of the Painting Project. Weidner discusses his fifty years as a teacher at the Academy, beginning in 1939, and the changes in the institution since then, including the introduction of printmaking, the growth of abstraction, the hiring of women and black instructors, and other changes. He speaks of his wife, Marilyn Kemp Weidner, a paper conservator, and the development of her practice, as well as his own future work.

Oral history interview with Ed Weinstein, 1983 June 14

Archives of American Art
Transcript 17 pages

An interview of Ed Weinstein conducted 1983 June 14, by Barbara Shikler, for the Archives of American Art's Mark Rothko and His Times oral history project.

Weinstein, Mark Rothko's first cousin, discusses family history, in particular his memories of Mark as a child and as a student at Yale.

Oral history interview with Kurt Weiser, 2006 May 22

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 47 pages.

An interview of Kurt Weiser conducted 2006 May 22, by Peter Held, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at the artist's studio, in Tempe, Arizona.

Weiser speaks of growing up in East Lansing, Michigan, near the Kresge Art Center at Michigan State University; his mother's encouragement of his interest in the arts; dropping out of high school in the ninth grade and working odd jobs until enrolling at Interlochen Arts Academy in Interlochen, Michigan; teaching himself firing techniques with Hal Reigger's book, "Primitive Pottery"; his relationship with his first ceramics teacher, Jean Parsons; and going to Kansas City Art Institute and meeting Ken Ferguson.

He discusses teaching in Portland after undergraduate school, first in the city at Portland Museum Art School, then in Marlyhurst; his studio at Hillside Center; selling pottery at the Ann Arbor Street Fair; attending graduate school at the University of Michigan and earning his M.F.A.; meeting Akio Takamori on a visit back to Kansas City Art Institute; his first experience at the Archie Bray Foundation in Helena, Mont.; and inviting international residents such as Suwanee Natewong to teach at the Bray.

He also covers his travels to Japan and Thailand; the drawings and sketches he did while abroad, and how these drawings inspired his black and white graffito-style pottery; his interests of natural and psychological subject matter; his use of color and inspirational artists such as Maxfield Parrish and Henri Rousseau; his methods for creating imagery; his teaching position at Arizona State University in Tempe; his opinions about the roles of the universities in art education, and of craft periodicals such as American Craft; his time at Guldagergard in Skaelskor, Denmark; and his involvement with National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts.

Weiser also recalls Victor Babu, Rick Hensley, Tom Coleman, Jackie Rice, John Stevenson, Ed Labow, and others.

Oral history interview with Allen Stuart Weller, 1992 May 1

Archives of American Art
1 sound cassette.

Transcript: 24 pages.

An interview with Allen Stuart Weller conducted 1992 May 1, by Stephen Polcari, for the Archives of American Art. Weller discusses his early training and his teaching career; traveling to Europe in the 1920s; the first American art courses offered at Princeton; working with the army to preserve monuments during WWII; teaching modern art during the 1950s; and the beginnings of the College Art Association.

Oral history interview with Neil Welliver, 1996 November 14

Archives of American Art
Sound recording: 2 sound cassettes (2 hr., 8 min.) : analog.

Transcript: 45 pages

An interview of Neil Welliver conducted 1996 November 14, by Robert F. Brown, for the Archives of American Art, in Welliver's home in Lincolnville, Maine.

Welliver talks about his childhood in Pennsylvania; his self-education; his marriage to a fashion illustrator; attending the Philadelphia Museum College of Art (now University of the Arts), receiving a BFA in 1953; teaching art in a public school; attending the Yale School of Art (MFA 1955) and teachers there; going to Maine; teaching at Yale (1955-1965); teaching at the University of Pennsylvania (1966-1989) at the graduate level. He recalls architect Louis Kahn at Yale and then at Pennsylvania; his various New York dealers from the 1960s, including Eleanor Ward at Stable Gallery, Aladar Marburger at Fischbach Gallery, and Pierre Lefraie at Marlborough Gallery; various art world friends, including Hilton Kramer, Clement Greenberg, and Fairfield Porter; and receiving an honorary doctorate of fine arts at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, 1996.

Oral history interview with James Lesesne Wells, 1989 November 16

Archives of American Art
2 sound cassettes

An interview of James Lesesne Wells conducted 1989 November 16, by Jock Reynolds and Richard Powell, for the Archives of American Art.

Wells speaks of his early childhood in Atlanta, Georgia and Florida; his education; his interest in drawing; symbolic storytelling; mythological subject matter; and African influence.

Oral history interview with James Wentzy, 2017 January 23-March 31

Archives of American Art
Sound recording: 15 sound files (5 hr., 13 min.) digital, wav

Transcript: 164 pages

An interview with James Wentzy, conducted 2017 January 23-March 31, by Cynthia Carr, for the Archives of American Art's Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project, at Wentzy's home and studio in New York, New York.

Wentzy speaks of his childhood in South Dakota; studying filmmaking at Southern Illinois University; moving to New York and shooting commercial films in the late 1970s; working and homesteading in the photography studio of James Dee; the beginning of the AIDS crisis; being diagnosed with HIV in 1990; his participation in and extensive documentation of ACT UP meetings, actions, and demonstrations; his place in the genealogy of AIDS activism; and his body of film and television work. Wentzy also recalls Darrel Ellis, Alanna Heiss, Arch Brown, James Dee, Robert Farber, Ho Tam, John Schnabel, Patrick Moore, Lou Maletta, Tony Arena, Vincent Satinire, David Buckingham, Jean Carlomusto, and others.

Oral history interview with Tom Wesselmann, 1984 January 3-February 8

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 196 pages

Audio excerpt: 1 sound file (5 min., 12 sec.) : digital

An interview of Tom Wesselmann conducted 1984 January 3-1984 February 8, by Irving Sandler, for the Archives of American Art.

Wesselmann speaks of his family, childhood and education; his U.S. Army service; his early interest in art and drawing; the influence of humor; going to the Cooper Union School on the GI bill; artists who influenced him in his early career; experiences which changed him; early experiments with collage; his first awareness of pop art; collage technique; his affiliation with the Tanager Gallery; his early nudes; eroticism in his paintings; politics and art. He recalls Alex Katz and Jim Dine.

Oral history interview with Clifford West, 1975 February 26-28

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 69 pages

An interview of Clifford West conducted 1975 February 26-28, by Dennis Barrie, for the Archives of American Art.

Oral history interview with Frederick Weston, 2016 August 31-September 5

Archives of American Art
4 sound files (5 hrs., 28 min.) digital, wav

Transcript: 130 pages.

An interview with Frederick Weston, conducted 2016 August 31 and September 5, by Theodore Kerr, for the Archives of American Art's Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project, at Weston's home in New York, N.Y.

Weston speaks of his childhood in Detroit; early understandings of his gender; attending Ferris State University in Michigan; moving to New York in 1973; New York nightclub culture before the AIDS crisis; studying at FIT and working in the fashion industry; beginning to consider himself an artist in the late 1990s after years of collage work in street settings; being diagnosed with HIV in the mid-1990s; imbuing his art with his personal experience; his body of work in photography, installations, and poetry; his health care and regiment since being diagnosed with HIV; evolutions in his personal outlook since being diagnosed; the trajectory of his sex life from adolescence; moving into his current apartment in Chelsea; and reflections on America's racial situation. Weston also recalls Claude Payne, Apollonia, Billy Blair, Stephanie Crawford, Franz Renard Smith, Dr. Joseph Sonnabend, Bruce Benderson, and others.

Oral history interview with Minor White, 1973 March 30-May 18

Archives of American Art
1 sound tape reel ; 5 in.

Transcript: 66 pages.

An interview of Minor White conducted 1973 March 30-May 18, by Robert Brown, for the Archives of American Art.

Oral history interview with Ian McKibbin White, 1980 November 24-1981 January 9

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 126 pages

An interview of Ian McKibbin White conducted 1980 November 24-1981 January 9, by Thomas Carr Howe, for the Archives of American Art.

White speaks of his education; U.S. Navy service, 1952-1955; travel, his museum career including work at the Brooklyn Botanical Garden, the Brooklyn Museum, the Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum at Bowdoin College, and the California Palace of the Legion of Honor; the merger of the California Palace of the Legion of Honor and the M.H. de Young Memorial Museum into the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco; the funeral of Alma de Bretteville Spreckels; Thomas Carr Howe as his mentor; FAMSF's "blockbuster exhibitions"; membership organizations; development of the American collection; fiscal problems and museum staff. He recalls David Levine, Jack McGregor, Aaron Shikler and others.

Oral history interview with Ian McKibbin White, 1987 January 8-12

Archives of American Art
Transcript 79 pages

An interview of retiring director of Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco Ian McKibbin White conducted 1987 January 8-12, by Paul J. Karlstrom, for the Archives of American Art.

Mr. White discusses the merger of the California Palace of the Legion of Honor and M. H. De Young Memorial Museum and other highlights of his 24-year tenure as director of the Fine Art Museums of San Francisco.

Oral history interview with Nelli Bar Wieghardt, 1987 July 9-1989 April 29

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 105 pages

An interview of Nelli Bar Wieghardt conducted 1987 July 9-1989 April 29, by Marina Pacini, for the Archives of American Art.

Wieghardt discusses her and her husband Paul Wieghardt's art training in Germany; their move to Paris in 1931; their emigration to the United States in 1940 and their involvement with Quaker refugee programs; their move to a hostel in Cummington, Massachusetts and subsequent employment at the Cummington School in the Hills and the Berkshire Museum; their move in 1943 to Philadelphia to set up and run an art department for the Friends Neighborhood Guild; exhibitions at the Carlen Galleries and their relationship with Albert Barnes; the move in 1946 to Chicago and their teaching careers and methods at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Illinois Institute of Technology; the University of Chicago, and the Evanston Art Center; their exhibition history; and the Wieghardt galleries at the State Museum, Ludensheid.

Oral history interview with John Wilde, 1979

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 95 pages

Transcript: 62 pages

An interview of John Wilde conducted 1979, by Michael Danoff, for the Archives of American Art.

Oral history interview with Frans Wildenhain, 1978 April 10-1979 July 28

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 63 pages

An interview of Frans Wildenhain conducted 1978 April 10-1979 July 28, by Robert Brown for the Archives of American Art.
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