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Found 5,751 Collections

 

Ancient Egypt: A Variety of Artifacts

A learning collection to be used for student research projects.
Kim Palermo
69
 

Powerful Symbols and Words: Abolitionism & Women's Rights

This collection looks at an image and phrase used widely in abolitionist materials, and at how that symbol was adopted and adapted by Sojourner Truth and/or other women's rights activists. Students will examine an abolitionist medallion and then learn about Sojourner Truth through a short reading, image analysis, and video. They can then review two version's of Sojourner Truth's speech and consider why the second version, as reported by another suffragette, Frances Gage, is markedly different. This collection is designed to be used as a short stand-alone lesson on the topic of the abolition movement and its intersection with the women's movement in the United States.

Tags: compare and contrast, change over time, "Ain't I a Woman?", abolition, slavery

Kate Harris
4
 

Resources for Teaching African-American History

A collection of teaching resources about African-American history, from slavery to modern-day. This is a work-in-progress based on the digitized materials within the Smithsonian Learning Lab's collection--it is not meant to be wholly definitive or authoritative. This collection will be updated frequently and includes both individual artifacts and lesson plans.

Kate Harris
38
 

Spanish-American War

The Spanish-American War was a conflict between the United States and Spain that ended Spanish colonial rule in the Americas and resulted in U.S. acquisitions of territories in the Pacific and Latin America.

The war originated with the Cuban struggle for independence from Spain in 1895. Demand for U.S. intervention increased after the unexplained sinking of the U.S.S. Maine on February 16, 1898 in Havana Harbour.

The U.S. declared war on Spain in April, 1898 and attacked Spain's interests in the Pacific and Cuba. Realizing that she was outclassed by American military power, Spain surrendered from Cuba in July, 1898 - effectively ending the war. Later that year, in December, 1898, Spain signed the Treaty of Paris in which they renounced their claims to Cuba, Puerto Rico, and Guam and transferred sovereignty over the Philippines to the U.S. for $20 million.

Source citation: "Spanish-American War." History.com. A&E Networks. 2016. Web. 6 Jan 2016
Linda Muller
17
 

Booker T. Washington and the Tuskegee Institute

This collection includes photographs and paintings that reveal information about Booker T. Washington's strategy for achieving civil rights for African-Americans, and about the subjects taught at Tuskegee. It is intended as an introductory activity on the subject, to be completed by students.

Tags: point of view, Reconstruction, Tuskegee Institute, civil rights, segregation, Gilded Age, cause effect

Kate Harris
6
 

Natural Resources of Pennsylvania

Which resources are naturally found in Pennsylvania? This collection of resources illustrates various natural resources found throughout Pennsylvania.
See if you can identify them and discuss what they are used for.
Kelly Heilman
15
 

PA coal Mining

This is a collection of the history of one of Pennsylvania's largest natural resources coal
Kelly Heilman
12
 

Trail of Tears

What was the Trail of Tears? What incidents led to the Trail of Tears? Who was removed from their native land? Where did they resettle? What was President Andrew Jackson's opinion on Indian removal? What was John Ross's opinion on Indian removal? What is your opinion on the event?

This Collection was created to be used as an introduction to the "Trail of Tears" event that occurred during the period of Westward Expansion. This Collection contains images of then President Andrew Jackson, John Ross, Chief of the Cherokee nation, and General Winfield Scott. It also includes Jackson's message to Congress, "On Indian Removal", the Treaty of New Echota along with a letter that Chief Ross wrote to the U.S. Congress denouncing the Treaty of New Echota which the government used as legal authority to remove the Cherokee from their native land.

Background Information:
In 1838 and 1839, President Andrew Jackson ordered the relocation of the Cherokee people from their native lands east of the Mississippi River to an area in what is known as present-day Oklahoma.
The Cherokee people called this forced migration the, "Trail of Tears" because of its devastating effects. The Cherokee people suffered hunger, disease, and exhaustion during their journey, resulting in 4,000 deaths out of the 15,000 Cherokees who were forced to relocate.

Source citation: "Trail of Tears." Africans in America. PBS Online. nd. Web. 7 Jan 2016.
Linda Muller
11
 

"Story" Paintings

Teaching resource includes paintings that can be used as prompts for descriptive writing. Note the details first, then interpret them to create a narrative.
Michelle Smith
8
 

The Renaissance of Science

How can new discoveries lead to change? This Collection features images of men whose discoveries changed human knowledge and understanding of the world in which they lived.
Linda Muller
6
 

Cuban Missile Crisis: Confrontation and Resolution

What happened during 13 days in October, 1962 when the United States confronted the Soviet Union about their activities in Cuba? Who was responsible for instigating the Cuban Missile Crisis; the United States, the Soviet Union, or Cuba? How close did we come to nuclear war? How was the conflict resolved?
This Collection is created to be used as a case study of the Cuban Missile Crisis. It contains resources that outline events that occurred during the Cuban Missile Crisis in October, 1962, including an online presentation from the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum, images and a Smithsonian Channel video.
Students should examine the resources in the Collection then develop a written response to the questions posed at the beginning of this activity.
Linda Muller
9
 

Harlem Renaissance of the early 1900s

What historical, social, and cultural factors influenced the Harlem Renaissance?
Why did Harlem become the center of African-American arts during the 1920s and 1930s?
Linda Muller
20
 

Minnesota: Investigating a Place

This teacher's guide uses stamps, photographs, paintings, objects, videos, and music to explore the history and culture of Minnesota, Land of 10,000 Lakes. In the classroom, these resources can be used by students to investigate two essential questions: How do you define Minnesota as a place? What does it mean to be a Minnesotan? 

Supporting questions and activity implementation ideas are located under this collection's Information (i) button.

Tess Porter
54
 

Learning to Look: Letter from Artist Yasuo Kuniyoshi, after the Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor

This collection includes student activities and learning to look questions, as well as additional teacher resources for extending the lesson. Students will use the primary sources to understand the changing perspectives and perceptions of Japanese Americans in the World War II era.

Keywords: Japanese Incarceration, George Biddle, Franklin D. Roosevelt, WW2, WWII, analysis, written response, essay, text, Max Yavno, Pearl Harbor, Works Progress Administration (WPA)

#APA2018 #EthnicStudies

#historicalthinking


Ashley Naranjo
12
 

Investigating a Place: Texas, a U.S. State Collection

This state collection utilizes stamps, artworks, photographs, and videos in the Smithsonian's collection to highlight 65 iconic people, places, events and symbols of Texas' history and culture. Students might explore one resource in depth, or conduct a comparison of multiple resources. Follow-up questions might include: What sub-themes can you identify within this collection? What do these resources as a collection tell you about Texas? What marks someone as a "Texan"--is it birthplace alone? What other resources would you want to include to tell a more complete story of Texas history and culture?
Ashley Naranjo
65
 

Bob Dylan and Woody Guthrie: Teaching Resources

This topical collection gathers resources about Bob Dylan, one of the most influential American music artists of the 20th century, and Woody Guthrie, who greatly influenced the work of Dylan and other folk artists. Ideas for classroom application located in "Notes to Other Users." Resources include images, videos, music, and a lesson plan.

Tags: minnesota; hibbing; folk music; medieval music; ballad; #SmithsonianMusic

Tess Porter
15
 

Botany and Art and Their Roles in Conservation

Lessons in this issue of Smithsonian in Your Classroom introduce students to the work of botanists and botanical illustrators, specifically their race to make records of endangered plant species around the world. The students try their own hands at botanical illustration, following the methods of a Smithsonian artist. Also included here are additional resources on the topic: a one-hour webinar and a website.

Click the PDF icons to download the issue and lesson materials.


Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
11
 

The March on Washington

The Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 60s tackled many problems facing African-Americans at the time. This collection offers a brief video introduction into the March on Washington in 1963, which brought national attention to many of these issues, and asks students to analyze a photograph and three artifacts from the March. Students will answer the question "What problems did participants in the March on Washington aim to solve?" and consider how these issues continue to have relevance in the United States today.

tags: Civil Rights, Martin Luther King, A. Phillip Randolph
Kate Harris
6
 

The Tuskegee Airmen

The Tuskegee Airmen were the first African-American fighter pilots in the United States military. This collection describes their work and training during an era of segregation, as well as their contributions to World War Two, through videos, photographs, art, and poetry. At the end of the collection, students are asked to write a poem of their own using one of the artifacts as inspiration.
Kate Harris
8
 

The Mexican-American War: Before, During, and After

The purpose of this collection is to have students consider the causes and consequences of the Mexican-American War. Students will analyze each item in the collection and determine whether it represents the time period before the war, during, or after. Then students will answer a set of broad questions about the war. While most items in the collection have accompanying text, students may need to consult their textbooks or outside resources in order to answer some questions.
Kate Harris
18
 

Teaching about the Chicano Movement

This collection gathers resources and artifacts pertaining to the Chicano Movement of the post-WWII era. The following paragraphs, from the Educating Change website, briefly define the movement:

The "Chicano Movement" has been used by historians to describe a moment of ethnic empowerment and protest among Americans of Mexican descent beginning in the 1960s. "Chicano" had long existed as a pejorative term among young Mexican Americans prior to this period. By the 1960s, however, young Mexican Americans embraced the label, reinscribing it with notions of pride in ones' Mexican heritage and defiance against institutions and individuals who practiced or condoned discrimination against Mexicans.

The "movement" or movimiento was really a convergence of multiple movements that historians have broken down into at least four components: [1] A youth movement represented in the struggle against discrimination in schools and the anti-war movement; [2] the farmworkers movement; [3] the movement for political empowerment, most notably in the formation of La Raza Unida Party; and [4] the struggle for control and ownership over "homelands" in the US Southwest (http://www.brown.edu/Research/Coachella/chicano.ht...). We will add an additional component of [5] creating art and music to reflect and voice cultural pride.

Students will review the collection here and identify five items that connect to one of the components listed above. They will then create their own collection that acts as a digital exhibit, teaching others about the Chicano Movement. This assignment is described in further detail on the last resource in this collection.

This is a work-in-progress based on the digitized materials within the Smithsonian Learning Lab's collection--it is not meant to be wholly definitive or authoritative.

Kate Harris
36
 

The Universe: An Introduction

This issue of Smithsonian in Your Classroom includes a lesson plan in which the class arranges pictures of heavenly bodies according to the students' best ideas of size, distance, and age. This active introduction to the cosmos can be a pre-assessment for a unit on space science. In a follow-up modeling exercise, relationships in space are brought down to a scale of two inches.

Click on the PDF icons to download the issue and ancillary materials.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
7
 

Abraham Lincoln: The Face of War

In lessons in this issue of Smithsonian in Your Classroom, portraits of Lincoln introduce a study of the Civil War. An analysis of the portraits—including the famous “cracked-plate" photograph, two plaster “life masks," and an eyewitness drawing of Lincoln's arrival in the enemy capital of Richmond, Virginia—leads to an analysis of the times.

Click on the PDF icons to download the issue and larger images of the portraits.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
11
 

What's Your Problem? A Look at the Environment in Your Own Backyard

Students take on a local environmental challenge in the lesson plans of this issue of Smithsonian in Your Classroom. Before deciding on a problem to tackle, they try interviewing local folks about the state of the community's environment and how it has changed through the years.

Click the PDF icon to see the Smithsonian in Your Classroom. Then check out oral-history interviewing tips on the site of the Smithsonian Center for Folklife. Also included below is an audio presentation on deer life by Smithsonian scientist Bill McShea.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
4
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