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Found 464 Collections

 

Jainism

This is a topical collection of resources related to Jainism. It includes sculptures, manuscripts, and paintings from the Smithsonian Institution's collection as well as links to outside web resources for further background information. Some questions to guide thinking are embedded throughout.

As they explore the collection, users might consider how Jain art and architecture reflect the main beliefs of the religion.

tags: ancient, India, religion, Jain, tirthankara, Mahavira, faith, Digambara, Svetambara

Kate Harris
12
 

James Smithson: What's in a Name?

Do you know how the Smithsonian got its name?  If you answered "no" you are not alone.  A lot of people know about the Smithsonian Institution, but they don't know about the man who gave his name and bequest to create what has become the largest museum complex and research center in the world.

Curious?  Well, here's the story...

Laura Shafer
11
 

Jamestown See Think Wonder

( Curated to support Virginia Standards of Learning for the  Virginia Studies course.)


Debbie Tannenbaum
9
 

Japanese American Incarceration: Articles and Videos about Inmate Experiences

This topical collection includes articles and videos about Japanese American experiences in incarceration camps.  The collection highlights four individuals and their stories: Fred Korematsu, a civil rights activist; Minoru Yasui, a lawyer and civil rights advocate; Norman Mineta, a politician who grew up in the camps; and Isamu Noguchi, an artist who self-deported himself to an incarceration camp. Other important articles and videos about inmate experiences are located at the end. This collection is one in a series of collections, each containing different types of resources, about the Japanese American Incarceration; see also Japanese American Incarceration: Images of Camp LifeJapanese Incarceration: Publications, Letters, and Other Documents, and Japanese American Incarceration: Camp Objects.

In February 1942, following the bombing of Pearl Harbor, President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 and authorized the imprisonment of approximately 75,000 Americans of Japanese ancestry and 45,000 Japanese nationals in incarceration camps.  This order was not rescinded until 1945.

Teachers and students may use this collection as a springboard for classroom discussion. This collection is not comprehensive but rather provides a launching point for research and study.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.

Keywords: internment camp, world war ii, ww2, wwii

#APA2018

Tess Porter
30
 

Japanese American Incarceration: Camp Objects

This topical collection includes objects used by inmates in Japanese American Incarceration camps.  It is one in a series of collections, each containing different types of resources, about the Japanese American Incarceration; see also Japanese American Incarceration: Images of Camp LifeJapanese Incarceration: Publications, Letters, and Other Documents, and Japanese American Incarceration: Articles and Videos about Inmate Experiences.

In February 1942, following the bombing of Pearl Harbor, President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 and authorized the imprisonment of approximately 75,000 Americans of Japanese ancestry and 45,000 Japanese nationals in incarceration camps.  This order was not rescinded until 1945.

Teachers and students may use this collection as a springboard for classroom discussion; for example, what types of objects inmates created during their incarceration and why they created these objects. This collection is not comprehensive but rather provides a launching point for research and study.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.

Keywords: internment camp, world war ii, ww2, wwii, gaman

#APA2018 

Tess Porter
42
 

Japanese American Incarceration: Images of Camp Life

This topical collection includes photographs and inmate-created artwork of life in Japanese American Incarceration camps.  It is one in a series of collections, each containing different types of resources, about the Japanese American Incarceration; see also Japanese Incarceration: Publications, Letters, and Other DocumentsJapanese American Incarceration: Camp Objects, and Japanese American Incarceration: Articles and Videos about Inmate Experiences.

In February 1942, following the bombing of Pearl Harbor, President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 and authorized the imprisonment of approximately 75,000 Americans of Japanese ancestry and 45,000 Japanese nationals in incarceration camps.  This order was not rescinded until 1945.

Teachers and students may use this collection as a springboard for classroom discussion; for example, how these images may reveal experiences of children and teenagers growing up in the camps. This collection is not comprehensive but rather provides a launching point for research and study.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.

Keywords: internment camp, Akio Ujihara, Yosh Kuromiya, world war ii, ww2, wwii, Jerome, Arkansas, Heart Mountain, Wyoming, Rohwer, Manzanar, California, Gila River, Arizona, Amache, Colorado, Tule Lake, Topaz, Utah, Minidoka, Idaho

#APA2018

Tess Porter
54
 

Japanese American Incarceration: Publications, Letters, and Other Documents

This topical collection includes yearbooks, magazines, letters, official announcements, and other important documents from the Japanese American Incarceration era.  It is one in a series of collections, each containing different types of resources, about the Japanese American Incarceration; see also Japanese American Incarceration: Images of Camp Life, Japanese American Incarceration: Camp Objects, and Japanese American Incarceration: Articles and Videos about Inmate Experiences.

In February 1942, following the bombing of Pearl Harbor, President Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 and authorized the imprisonment of approximately 75,000 Americans of Japanese ancestry and 45,000 Japanese nationals in incarceration camps.  This order was not rescinded until 1945.

Teachers and students may use this collection as a springboard for classroom discussion; for example, what documents reveal about the restrictions placed on Japanese American families while they were incarcerated. This collection is not comprehensive but rather provides a launching point for research and study.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.

Keywords: internment camp, world war ii, ww2, wwii, rohwer center high school yearbook, magazine, newsletter, isamu noguchi, calendar

Tess Porter
51
 

Japanese Rice Farmers in Texas

This collection includes resources about focusing on the story the Japanese rice farmers who immigrated to Texas in the early 1900's. Included are photos of the Japanese farmers in the rice fields and photos of families who owned the largest rice farms.

Teachers and students may use this collection as a springboard for classroom discussions , such as those about immigration policy and/or discrimination. This collection is not comprehensive but rather provides a launching point for research and study. Documents are included to guide students through analysis activities of the documents, photos and oral history.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. 

Keywords: Japanese immigration,rice farming, sharecropping

 #EthnicStudies

Melanie Schwebke
24
 

Joseph Henry, scientist, inventor, educator, first Smithsonian Secretary: Once perhaps the most famous U.S. scientist

First Secretary of the Smithsonian, Joseph Henry, was enormously famous in his time and much accomplished as a scientist and inventor. Here is a peek at his life and what he left for history to find.  You will find photos and documents about Henry’s life  and family and how he laid the foundation for the Smithsonian as the world’s largest museum and research complex. 

Linda Feldman
21
 

Joseph Stella in the Smithsonian collections

Joseph Stella (1877-1946) was an Italian born American Futurist painter. He is best known for his renditions of industrial America.

Included in this collection are some his works from the collections of the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, the National Portrait Gallery, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, with oral history interviews from the Smithsonian Institution Library and the Smithsonian Archives of American Art. You can find other works by searching the collections.


Philippa Rappoport
32
 

Kids Can Cook!

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring cooking. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also listen to kids' podcast about cooking as well as design a new utensil. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
35
 

Labor Movements, Unions, and Musicians

Smithsonian resources that relate to labor movements, trade unions, and worker protests. The collection includes sites, sounds, and education materials. Topics include union leadership, labor music, historic advances in labor policy, service workers, and agricultural labor. The collection also includes creative depictions of kept figures in various labor movements and renowned labor musicians such as Woody Guthrie, Pete Seeger, and Joe Glazer.  

#NHD2018 #NHD #SmithsonianMusic

Meredith Holmgren
50
 

Lalibela, Ethiopia: Teaching Resources

This topical collection gathers teaching resources on Lalibela, a UNESCO site in Ethiopia famous for its rock-hewn churches built in the 12th and 13th centuries CE. Christianity was established early in Ethiopia, and orthodox Christianity became the official religion of the Axumite Kingdom in the 4th century CE. Includes a video, a website, objects, and a contemporary painting from the National Museum of African Art.

Tess Porter
11
 

Landscapes

Choose several images to compare/contrast in terms of location, season, and/or style. Discuss why artists may choose to depict a particular place.

Formal analysis for elementary students: identify foreground, middle ground and background; describe how size and placement of objects and use of overlapping contribute to the illusion of depth.

Formal analysis for secondary students: describe color harmonies; identify focal point; find examples of one-point, two point, and atmospheric perspective.

Jean-Marie Galing
29
 

Landscapes

Choose several images to compare/contrast in terms of location, season, and/or style. Discuss why artists may choose to depict a particular place.

Formal analysis for elementary students: identify foreground, middle ground and background; describe how size and placement of objects and use of overlapping contribute to the illusion of depth.

Formal analysis for secondary students: describe color harmonies; identify focal point; find examples of one-point, two point, and atmospheric perspective.

Tracy Dumais
38
 

Latin American Artists

Latin American works from the Permanent Collection at The Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum at Florida International University. The works represent a timeline that spans thousands of years from pre colombian to present day.

#LatinoHAC

Mirmac16
28
 

Laughter is the Best Medicine

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring laughter. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also listen to kids' podcast about laughter as well as try not to laugh at a compilation of Elmo's laughter. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
38
 

Letters From Home: Chinese Exclusion and Family

The following digital exhibit highlights the personal experiences of Chinese immigrants in Seattle, WA during the early 20th century. The letter translations add the Wing Luke Museum's extensive archive of Chinese Exclusion era primary source letters into the canon of US history. This lesson is designed to capture the aesthetic, emotional and era-specific conventions in letter writing/correspondence,

The content includes historical references to further develop a student's understanding of Pull factors in immigration: the conditions driving populations to create new homes in new lands.

#APA2018 #TCSWingLuke


Rahul Gupta
19
 

Libraries From Your Couch

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring libraries. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about research as well as listen to the read aloud Library Lion. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
36
 

Like a Fish to Water

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring swimming. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a video about water safety as well as a videos about animals swimming. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
36
 

Living Things: Parts and Purposes

This collection reinforces the question:

How do the parts of plants and animals help them to grow and survive? 

Students will look for patterns as they observe various plant and animal artifacts to determine the necessary parts for living organisms.

The visible thinking routine of "parts, purposes and complexities" will be at the center of this collection as we analyze the needs of plants and animals and how their parts satisfy those needs.  While we took a deep dive into just a couple of the living things, I've included a few other artifacts for educator choice.  

This collection also utilizes the See, Think, Wonder routine to help pique student interest, build student engagement and introduce the concept of parts and purposes of living things.  

*I paired this lesson with a real world observation of a plant to observe, examine and describe the function of plant parts.


#PZPGH

Katie Richter
10
 

Lowell's Cambodian American Performing Arts: Tradition & Innovation

This collection includes materials about Angkor Dance Troupe (classical and folk dance) and Flying Orb Productions (contemporary, hybrid performance and film), both located in Lowell, MA. 

Although the two organizations have different aesthetic styles, they both provide channels for Cambodian American youth and  young people of other ethnicities to connect with cultural traditions as well as to express themselves in new ways. 

Keywords: Asia* America*, Cambodia* America*, Khmer, dance, film, drama, performance, Angkor Dance Troupe, Flying Orb Productions, Southeast Asia*, Khmerica*, Southeast Asian America*

#APA2018 #TCSLowell 

Southeast Asian Digital Archive
17
 

Lowell's Cambodian American Performing Arts: Tradition & Innovation

This collection includes materials about Angkor Dance Troupe (classical and folk dance) and Flying Orb Productions (contemporary, hybrid performance and film), both located in Lowell, MA. 

Although the two organizations have different aesthetic styles, they both provide channels for Cambodian American youth and  young people of other ethnicities to connect with cultural traditions as well as to express themselves in new ways. 

Keywords: Asia* America*, Cambodia* America*, Khmer, dance, film, drama, performance, Angkor Dance Troupe, Flying Orb Productions, Southeast Asia*, Khmerica*, Southeast Asian America*

#APA2018 #TCSLowell 

Douglas StLawrence
17
 

Madeline Gleason, Poet / Painter / Playwright, Born: Fargo, North Dakota (1903 - 1979)

Madeline Gleason was a poet and the founder of the San Francisco Poetry Guild. In 1947, she directed  the first poetry festival in the United States, laying the groundwork (along with other figures such as Kenneth Rexroth, Robert Duncan, William Everson, Jack Spicer, James Broughton, et al.) for what became known as the San Francisco Renaissance. She was, with Helen Adam, Barbara Guest, and Denise Levertov, one of only four women whose work was included in Donald Allen's landmark anthology, The New American Poetry 1945-1960 (1960).

In 1934, Gleason moved to San Francisco, California to work on a history of California for the WPA Writer's Project. Two years later, a sequence of her poems was published in Poetry. For a number of years, she worked with the composer John Edmunds, translating songs by Schumann, Schubert and J. S. Bach. The pair also organised song festivals.

Her first book, Poems, was published in 1944. By this time she had moved to Phoenix, Arizona because of the war.

She also was an artist who painted many whimsical paintings.

Unfortunately, she is sometimes left out of historical roundups about poetry from the era (as noted in one of the attached resources tiled "Rebels...").

Hannah Onstad
14
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