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Community slab none

NMNH - Paleobiology Dept.

Community slab none

NMNH - Paleobiology Dept.

My Community

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Teacher-created lesson in which young students delve into the history of their community by interviewing someone who attended their school in the past. They then design maps showing how the school might have been arranged in the past.

Community Explorations

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Lesson on urban planning in which students evaluate positive and negative ways their community interacts with the environment, document green spaces, and write a persuasive essay encouraging community care of green spaces.

Community Dreams

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Online exhibit exploring the impact that the development of coast-to-coast railroads had on life in America. Railroads made it possible for towns and cities to flourish away from the coasts and waterways that had been America's main transportation networks, creating new social, political, and economic ties. This is the second section of the online exhibition America on the Move.

Community Development

National Museum of the American Indian

Anacostia Community Museum

SI Center for Learning and Digital Access
Main website of Anacostia Community Museum Center for African American History and Culture, a national center for exhibitions, research, historical documentation, collecting, and educational programs relating to African American history and culture and the African Diaspora in the Americas.

Hereford Community Building (unbuilt)

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Miraculous Hills Community Resettlement

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Thunder Valley Regenerative Community

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Community Helpers Card Game

National Museum of American History

Newport News Community Award

National Museum of American History

Creativity in Community

Anacostia Community Museum
The Smithsonian's Anacostia Community Museum needs your help in creating a name and slogan for our upcoming exhibition on creativity in the community. Interested? View this video and learn more!

Community Chest Button

National Museum of American History
Round Community Chest button. The button is white with a red border. White text on the border reads “Community Chest.” Blue text in the white center reads “I’ve Given.” In 1913 the first Community Chest was established in Cleveland, Ohio. The aim of a Community Chest was to pool local monetary resources, particularly those from local business and social services, and to then distribute the money among the community for its needs. Community Chests grew in popularity in the United States and Canada during World War I, during which time they were known as War Chests—over three hundred cities had War Chests by the summer of 1918. The typical mode of donating to a community War Chest was to pledge part of your salary to the chest. Today the Community Chest organization is known as United Way. Much like the use of military insignia to identify its wearer (by association with an organization) and his/her achievements, these pins and buttons were meant to be worn by Americans on the home front during World War I to show their membership in an organization and/or their contribution to a particular war effort, such as the United War Work Campaign. The pins and buttons displayed the wearer’s patriotism and generosity and undoubtedly also served to prompt others to become similarly involved in the various war efforts. SOURCE: “History,” United Way, unitedway.org/pages/history. “History,” United Way of LaPorte County, unitedwaylpc.org/history. Oliver Zunz, Philanthropy in America: A History (Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2012), 51–66.

Community Remembrance Book

National Museum of American History
This book contains over 300 messages and drawings from the citizens of Mountain View, California.

Shortly after the terrorist attacks of September 11, Mountain View city officials put a blank album in the rotunda area of City Hall. They also collected written thoughts and drawings from local residents regarding the events of the day and bound them into the album. According to Linda Forsberg, Deputy City Manager, the book was "to provide an opportunity for folks in the community to express how they were reacting to the events, and we also hoped it would provide an opportunity for the community to come together and engender some discussion about September 11."

Floating Community Lifeboats

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

"Community Property Agreement"

National Museum of American History

Indian Community House

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden

Collinwood Community Center

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Community in Prayer

National Museum of African American History and Culture
A black-and-white photograph of a congregation of men and women raising their hands in the air to receive prayer. The photograph is signed by the photographer in the bottom right corner.

Bang-Bua Canal Community Upgrading

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Community Leadership Perspectives Slideshow

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
This video is featured in the exhibition 'By the People: Designing a Better America,' on view at Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum September 2016–February 2017. Learn more at /www.cooperhewitt.org/channel/by-the-people. By Siemond Chan, Sarah Williams, and Laurie Rubel. Courtesy of Courtesy of Studio Gang. THIS VIDEO HAS NO SOUND.

Slideshow: Collingwood Community Center

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
This video is featured in the exhibition 'By the People: Designing a Better America,' on view at Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum September 2016–February 2017. Learn more at /www.cooperhewitt.org/channel/by-the-people. Images courtesy of City Architecture. THIS VIDEO HAS NO SOUND.

Consequences of Community Drift

Smithsonian Libraries
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