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Found 3,716,067 Resources

Drawing

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Playing card

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
At top: M 6 C; below central image: 1

Square

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Cyperus sp.

NMNH - Botany Dept.

Dietzgen Instruction Manual for Maniphase Slide Rule

National Museum of American History
The citation information for this sixteen-page booklet is: Self-teaching Instruction Manual: Maniphase Slide Rule (Chicago: Eugene Dietzgen Co., n.d.). The slide rule depicted inside the manual is Dietzgen's "National," model 1767, and the manual was received with 1988.0367.01. Detailed instructions are provided for reading the scales, multiplication, placing the decimal point, division, proportion, squares and square roots, cube and cube roots, trigonometry, and logarithms. "Maniphase" on the cover refers to an arrangement of scales in which the company added K and CI scales to Mannheim rules; the word is printed on several slide rules sold by the Eugene Dietzgen Company. Indeed, the manual indicates portions of it could be used with other Dietzgen slide rules, such as model 1772A. Reference: Walter Shawlee, "The Dietzgen Company Archive," http://www.sphere.bc.ca/test/dietzgen.html.

Hoffmannia sp.

NMNH - Botany Dept.

Textile

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Drawing

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Drawing

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Trunk

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Trunk with domed lid, fitted with iron-corner plates and handles, edges studded with brass nails. Covered with wool needlepoint in bold scroll and floral design worked in tent stitch, in shades of red, yellow and blue. Lid battered and worn.

print

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum

Game Boy

National Museum of American History
The Nintendo Game Boy was released in 1989. It was a handheld video game console that combined aspects of Nintendos successful Nintendo Entertainment System (NES) television video game console with their earlier handheld electronic games marketed under the name "Game & Watch." It contained an 8-bit Z80 processor with a monochrome LCD display and 4-channel stereo sound. Shortly after the introduction of the Game Boy, Sega and Atari released handheld games, the Sega Game Gear and the Atari Lynx. Both had superior color LCD displays but both also suffered from short battery life and limited game availability. Nintendo shipped over 100 million units of the Game Boy and its successor, the Game Boy Color around the world.

All original Game Boys were bundled with Tetris, an addictive game developed in 1985 by Russian mathematician Alexey Pazhitnov, assisted by Dmitry Pavlovsky and Vadim Gerasimov. As with the NES, game software was stored on removable cartridges, allowing users to switch games at whim. Nintendo also marketed a number of accessories with this version of the Game Boy, including a camera and printer attachment.

The Seasons

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
Fluted earthenware vase on short rounded foot with glazed allegories of the four seasons outlined and shaded in black with yellow, blue, teal and red accents.

Saurauia pseudorubiformis Buscal.

NMNH - Botany Dept.
Syntype, according to Tropicos.

Further described in Malpighia 27:149. 1916.

Nectandra superba A.C. Sm.

NMNH - Botany Dept.

collision ball apparatus (newton's cradle)

National Museum of American History

Nolina texana S. Watson

NMNH - Botany Dept.

Lepechinia glomerata Epling

NMNH - Botany Dept.

America; The Star Spangled Banner

National Museum of American History

Phyllanthus longipes Steyerm., nom. illeg.

NMNH - Botany Dept.
Annotation label with "Gymnanthes tenuis Webster [nom. nov.] attached to specimen, but name published as Gymnanthes belizensis.

Crataegus cibaria Beadle

NMNH - Botany Dept.

Drawing

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
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