Skip to Content
  • Language
  • End User
  • Educational Use
  • Time Required
(441)
(854)
(1,137)
(1,070)
(1,263)
(32)
(568)
(444)
(261)
(543)
(210)
(216)

Found 1,295 Collections

 

Highlights of the National Portrait Gallery

This collection presents highlights of the National Portrait Gallery with an emphasis on the schools of art and media, as well as styles and techniques used by artists to portray their subjects and capture their essence.  Since the mission of the Gallery is to tell the American story through the lives of people who made significant contributions, all of the sitters are American, and the vast majority of the artists are as well.   First we will look at some traditional portraits and then take a look at how portraiture has evolved in the U.S. over the last two centuries.

Sheila Lopez
20
 

The Boggs Collection

Art inspires us to appreciate, enjoy and reflect.  While no longer here to speak to that, Mae Helene Bacon Boggs generously gave us her collection of California paintings to find our own perspective in these matters. The art collection at Shasta is as unique as the collector, Mrs. Boggs, who not only collected the works, but was also instrumental in the development of Shasta as a California State Park.  She donated a fine library and archives to provide intellectual support for this collection. 

The legacy and philanthropy of Mrs. Boggs---her contributions to history and art---reside in Shasta State Historic Park, the only designated art gallery within California State Park System.  In 1871, at the age of eight, Mrs. Boggs had moved with her mother from Missouri to Shasta.  Her uncle, Williamson Lyncoya Smith, cared for them.  Smith was the division agent for the California State Company from 1853 through 1888 and, in this capacity, established the first stage line along the Sacramento River.  In honor, his name is assigned to the gallery as Mrs. Boggs wished.

            In her later years, Mrs. Boggs moved to San Francisco, established a successful business, and in 1902 married Angus Gordon Boggs, an important mining businessman.  Upon entering the social scene in San Francisco, she devoted herself to local and statewide improvements.  The list of those is long.

 

            Her correspondence, always signed “Faithfully, Mae Helene Bacon Boggs” has allowed us to appreciate, enjoy and reflect on both art and history.  Those of us familiar with the story of Mrs. Boggs and her art collection develop a deep respect as well as a fervent desire to further her preservation efforts.

Shasta_ranger
76
 

Willi Smith

Willi Smith (1958-1987)

Willi Smith was an African American fashion designer whose street wear line known as WilliWear was and experiment of democracy in fashion. WilliWear designs were known to be bold, blurring the lines between high and low culture, and his work often involved collaborations with other artists and designers. The openly gay designer's career was cut short when he died in 1987 from complications from HIV/AIDS.

This collection is a representation of the 2020 exhibition Willi Smith: Street Couture at the Cooper Hewitt Design Museum, which features over 200 pieces from Smith’s work and career and his numerous collaborations with artists, dancers, choreographers, graphic designers, architects, and more. The works on view include video, sketches, patterns, photographs, and garments.

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
67
 

Voices of Social Justice

This Learning Lab complements the National Portrait Gallery's student program, Voices of Social Justice.

Students will learn about some of the major figures who struggled to obtain civil rights for disenfranchised or marginalized groups. They will listen to stories of social justice and analyze portraits of individuals who broke barriers—from key nineteenth-century reformers to modern leaders—and will likely be encouraged to consider how they, too, can become civically engaged.

#NPGteach


Nicole Vance
117
 

Donut Worry, Be Happy

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring donuts. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a video about the history of donuts as well as podcast episodes about donuts. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
18
 

Culturally Reflective Teaching in the Museum

Explore how portraiture can elevate culturally responsive teaching (CRT)! Discover how art can be integrated into the classroom to create a learning environment that affirms students’ strengths, insights, and experiences. 

Components of CRT:

  • Having positive perspectives on the parents and families of students
  • Communication of high expectations
  • Learning within the context of culture
  • Student-centered instruction
  • Culturally mediated instruction 
  • Institutional policies and practices that support culturally reflective teaching
  • Teacher as facilitator

Ladson-Billings, G. (1994). The dreamkeepers. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishing Co.

Ashleigh Coren
45
 

Representation of Music

Made by Lily Clemente-Cong

Cooper Hewitt Design Scholars
8
 

Murals: Public Art with A Message

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring murals. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can watch videos from muralist about their work. As a family you can talk about how these murals tell a story or have a message. What story does it tell? What message does the muralist want to send to the public? What is worth making the subject of mural? Who do muralist make their work for? At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
42
 

LL Cool J Text-to-Image Analysis

This collection works to establish connections between a portrait of LL Cool J and some of his words. How can these excerpts help us to understand this portrait? What layers of meaning and nuance do they add? How can this portrait help us to see his work in a new way?

Haley Potter
5
 

James Baldwin

This collection works to establish connections between a portrait of James Baldwin and examples of his writing. How can these excerpts help us to understand this portrait? What layers of meaning and nuance do they add? How can this portrait help us to see his writing in a new way?

Haley Potter
4
 

Gertrude Stein Text-to-Image Analysis

This collection works to establish connections between a portrait of Gertrude Stein and examples of her writing. How can these excerpts help us to understand this portrait? What layers of meaning and nuance do they add? How can this portrait help us to see her writing in a new way?

Haley Potter
8
 

George Washington Text-to-Image Analysis

This collection works to establish connections between a very famous portrait of George Washington and examples of his documents relevant to it. How can these excerpts help us to understand this portrait? What layers of meaning and nuance do they add? How can this portrait help us to see our first president in a new way?

Haley Potter
7
 

The Four Justices Text-to-Image Collection

This collection works to establish connections between a portrait of the four female justices of the Supreme Court and documents about and by them. How can these excerpts help us to understand this portrait? What layers of meaning and nuance do they add? How can this portrait help us to see these women in a new way?

Haley Potter
6
 

Toni Morrison Text-to-Image Analysis

This collection works to establish connections between a portrait of Toni Morrison and examples of her writing. How can these excerpts help us to understand this portrait? What layers of meaning and nuance do they add? How can this portrait help us to see her writing in a new way?

Haley Potter
5
 

E.O. Wilson Text-to-Image Analysis

This collection works to establish connections between a portrait of Edward O. Wilson and examples of his work. How can these excerpts help us to understand this portrait? What layers of meaning and nuance do they add? How can this portrait help us to see his work in a new way?

Haley Potter
4
 

Silk- Function, Fashion, Usage

By Courtney Huang

Cooper Hewitt Design Scholars
21
 

Cooper Hewitt Design Scholars' Design Explorations

The Spring 2020 Cooper Hewitt Design Scholars, a group of high school students with an interest in pursuing design as a career path, have explored design through independent research into topics of interest in design, ranging from contemporary fashion design to surrealism to an exploration of silk. Below, find their collections, created as part of these explorations. Bravo, Cooper Hewitt Design Scholars! 

Cooper Hewitt Design Scholars
136
 

Alexander Hamilton Text-to-Image Analysis

This collection works to establish connections between a portrait of Alexander Hamilton and examples of his correspondences. How can these excerpts help us to understand this portrait? What layers of meaning and nuance do they add? How can this portrait help us to see Hamilton in a new way?

Haley Potter
11
 

Digital Storytelling with Museum Objects in the Smithsonian Learning Lab (RDMF Conference Workshop)

This Learning Lab collection was made to complement the presentation, "Digital Storytelling with Museum Objects in the Smithsonian Learning Lab," at the RDMF20: RDM and Data Sharing/Openness in the Arts conference on 3 June, 2020.  The conference is hosted by the University of Edinburgh's Digital Curation Centre, a world-leading centre of expertise in digital information curation with a focus on building capacity, capability and skills for research data management.  

During the workshop,  co-facilitated by Dr. Antonia Liguori (Loughborough University, UK) and Dr. Philippa Rappoport (Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access), participants will be introduced to both the Learning Lab and Digital Storytelling (DS) as platforms to explore museum objects in relation to data sharing and openness in the arts. This session will demonstrate a variety of techniques to incorporate personal experiences in the exploration and use of museum resources, and will share how the Smithsonian Learning Lab can be used to access digital resources, build learning experiences, and cultivate collaboration and community over distance.

We will explore artwork from an exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC, Eye to I: Self-Portraiture as an Exploration of Identity), which compels viewers to consider how self-portraits reflect an artist’s identity through what is revealed and concealed. We will look specifically at the Eye to Eye artworks from the context of social distancing and unrest in the time of Covid-19 as a prompt to make personal connections. 

After an introduction to the Smithsonian Learning Lab and previous experiences with Digital Storytelling within that environment, participants will be engaged in discussions about: 

  • how Digital Storytelling can supplement and inform ontologies and metadata to extract meanings from museums' digital collections and therefore activate data to inform curatorial practice in museums;
  • how Digital Storytelling can enhance the educational values of museums’ objects and stimulate multiple contexts of understanding and co-creation;
  • how digital technology, applied not necessarily in museum spaces, can connect local communities to the museum, and in particular how Digital Storytelling could facilitate this discourse by engaging hard to reach audiences.

You will find in this collection:

  • a short icebreaker activity using exhibition images to start shifting from a cognitive appreciation of art to a personal connection to museum objects;
  • some examples of annotated objects that demonstrate the functionality of the Learning Lab;
  • some examples of digital stories made by other educators during previous Digital Storytelling workshops 'embedded' in the Learning Lab;
  • a description of the Digital Storytelling process;
  • workshop participants' reflections; 
  • supplemental resources. 


Philippa Rappoport
36
 

Easy PZ: Think / Puzzle / Explore (Focus: Reflecting on Teaching)

Each Easy PZ collection includes an artwork or museum object and a recorded webinar demonstrating how to use it to develop students' skills with a Harvard Project Zero thinking routine. Supplementary resources provide context relevant to understanding the featured artwork or object.

This collection models the routine "Think / Puzzle / Explore" with museum resources from the National Museum of African Art and the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden to reflect on teaching and explore opportunities for the future.

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
21
 

Making: Design a Protest Poster

Inspired by a workshop activity hosted by 2018 National Design Award winner for Communication Design Civilization, download the included worksheet and follow along to create your own visually-impactful protest poster. 

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
25
 

Tuia te here tangata waka | Binding the ties of humanity canoe

This collection is built around a waka Māori currently on display in the National Museum of Natural History.
waka is a traditional canoe. It is designed as a portal to Te Ao Māori - The indigenous worldview  Māori are the native people of New Zealand. Its traditional name is Aotearoa meaning Land of the long white cloud.

This waka was made from a single 100-year old Tōtara tree. Tōtara is a large native New Zealand hardwood that grows throughout the North and South Island. It is light weighted and high natural oil content which prevents rotting or deterioration. Waka are extensions of Māori tribal history and are the traditional technology responsible for mobilising navigators across the Pacific Ocean. The infamous explorer Kupe, discovered New Zealand in 925 AD.

The name of the waka is Tuia te here tangata meaning Binding the ties of humanity. It celebrates the connection established in 1840 between the US Exploring expedition and Māori. The name and physical artefact hope to inspire understanding. The collection aims to digitally illustrate the mauri or life force of the waka. We can transform our wounds into wisdom by seeking first to understand, and then to be understood.

Anahera Hare
66
 

Collage: How Can We Tell A Story Through Assembled Objects?

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring collage. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a video about collage from artist Mark Bradford and how make a collage from the MET. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
35
 

Speaking Out: Posters

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring posters. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they wonder, and compare how they are alike and different. Families can check out the posters and consider how each of the letters are designed. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
26
1-24 of 1,295 Collections