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Found 1,602 Collections

 

"...Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death!"

This teaching collection includes resources such as postage stamps, artworks and dramatic readings related to Patrick Henry, a Founding Father of the United States, who famously ended his speech at the Virginia Convention on March 23, 1775, with the phrase "...give me liberty or give me death." Also included are suggested Speech Analysis Questions from ReadWriteThink to support careful examination of Henry's speeches. Guiding Question: How did this speech inspire change in the colonies? Use textual evidence to support your answer.
Ashley Naranjo
8
 

"An Unnoticed Struggle: A Concise History of Asian American Civil Rights Issues" | Complementary Resources

This topical collection can be used as a complement to the Japanese American Citizens League (JACL) Resource, "An Unnoticed Struggle: A Concise History of Asian American Civil Rights Issues" (https://jacl.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/Unnoticed-Struggle.pdf). Each section of this collection aligns with the historical events, impactful legislation and profiles of individuals outlined within the JACL's resource.

This collection can be used to support a deep dive into the featured topics and provides sources that will be helpful in answering compelling and supporting questions, taking into consideration multiple perspectives represented in the sources. 

#EthnicStudies *This collection was created to support Unit 1: Precious Knowledge--Exploring notions of identity and community, Historical Foundations and Civil Rights of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part A course.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. 

Ashley Naranjo
47
 

"Becoming Dolores": A School/Museum Program to Engage Families through Art and Technology

This collection details a photography and community engagement project that the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access did with educators from the National Portrait Gallery and the Fairfax County Family Literacy Program. It includes assets and resources designed to help teachers (art, English, social studies, and media technology), museum educators, and community-based informal learning educators recreate the program as is, or design their own, based on the specific needs of their classroom or learning community. 

For our project, pairs of native Spanish speaking immigrant moms and their middle school children did a five-day (15 hours total) training session at their school and at the Smithsonian Portrait Gallery. They learned about Dolores Huerta, portraiture, and photojournalism through the exhibition, "One Life: Dolores Huerta." Participants took portraits of themselves, critiqued each other's work, and created photo exhibitions about their communities and important issues, that were displayed at the Hispanic Heritage Month Family Day at the National Portrait Gallery.

Dolores Huerta, the "co-architect" of the American Farm Workers Movement and mother to eleven children, proved to be a huge inspiration to the participants. Before the workshop, 33 percent of the parents and none of the children saw themselves as able to make change in their community; after the workshop, 100 percent of parents and children reported seeing themselves as able to make change in their community. In addition, 100 percent of the mothers and 80 percent of the children reported that they believed they had increased their artistic skills.

#LatinoHAC, #EthnicStudies 

This collection supports Units 2 (What is the History - Civil Rights Movements) and 3 (Critical Geography and Current Issues) of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part A course, and Unit 3 (Local History and Current Issues) of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part B course. "What would you advocate for to beneficially change your community? How can you advocate to create change within your community?" "How do you understand the concept of community advocacy? What is needed for an individual to cultivate personal change?"

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center. 

Philippa Rappoport
15
 

"Crossing the Delaware": Who is portrayed in American history?

This collection highlights variations on a theme through works of art: George Washington Crossing the Delaware, George Washington Carver Crossing the Delaware and Shimomura Crossing the Delaware. Comparisons of these works could serve as springboards for discussions about identity, immigration, "master" or dominant narratives in history, and hero myths.

#EthnicStudies

Ashley Naranjo
7
 

"Diary, December 12, 1941": Japanese American Internment, Propaganda, and Superheroes

This folder contains a lesson concept, lesson materials, related Project Zero thinking routines, and some optional related / extension resources for a six-day middle school unit that explores Japanese-American internment and WWII government propaganda through Roger Shimomura's "Diary, December 12, 1941." This collection is intended for teachers and can be modified to fit a shorter or longer period of time.  #SAAMteach

#historicalthinking

Alexandra Hartley
19
 

"Diary: December 12, 1941," internment in America, and the literature of exile

Beginning with Roger Shimomura's "Diary: December 12, 1941," students will engage with a variety of primary and secondary documents, works of art, and interviews as an entry point into Mohsin Hamid's contemporary work of magical realism, Exit, West.  

Aerie Treska
28
 

"Let Women Fly!": Female Aviators and Astronauts

Did you know that astronaut Mae Jemison carried a picture of aviator Bessie Coleman in her uniform pocket? Or that astronaut Sally Ride was a major supporter of vice presidential candidate Geraldine Ferraro? Maybe you knew that Jane Briggs Hart was Michigan's first female helicopter pilot and flew her husband, the late Senator Hart, to his political campaign stops as well as being vocal and liberal political activist? Find out about these inspirational women and others in this collection. This topical collection is a great starting point for research about female aviators and astronauts, and includes articles, images, artifacts, and video. Some guiding questions to consider might be:
-Why do you think it was so challenging for female pilots to become accepted? Compare the inclusion of women in aviation to other industries and fields.
-What role did the military play in the growth in the number of female aviators?
-What connections can you find between various female pilots and astronauts?
-Is being the "first" of something a political act? How do many female aviation leaders use their public voice?

#BecauseOfHerStory

Kate Harris
48
 

"Nightstand Portraits": A Burton Morris-inspired Activity

This teaching resource collection includes an activity, (created by the Heinz History Center's Education Manager, Mariruth Leftwich), highlighting Pittsburgh-native pop artist Burton Morris' "Nightstand Portraits" series as a springboard for students to create their own imaginary "Nightstand Portrait". This could be a portrait of themselves, a historical figure, or even an icebreaker activity for students to introduce each other to the rest of the class.
Ashley Naranjo
8
 

"Ohhh.. The Wondeful Timelessness of Women"

As time goes by, we evolve and old ways become replaced with new ways of thinking. The American revolution consisted of a time when women went by patriarchal views and values. During this time women were taught men were the head of the household and were in power and more important.

Although, as time passes we saw women standing up for themselves. We saw women claiming more and asking for more. I wanna explore a topic not talked about enough and that is the significance that the patriarchal role had on making women feel inadequate and therefore contributing to this magnified role in the American revolution. In my collection, I will showcase artifacts and pieces of evidence exhibiting how women's inferior social class still plays an amplified role in the revolution.

Sierra Walker
10
 

"Pertenecer": Using Museum Objects to Prompt Stories and Explore Sense of Place and Belonging

Pertenecer is a digital storytelling workshop that enhances the 4Cs (Creativity, Critical thinking, Collaboration, Communication) and improves digital literacy.  In this three-day workshop participants attending Fairfax County Public School Family Literacy and/or the Parent Leadership programs will use museum objects as prompts to create videos of personal stories. No technical experience is necessary, but participants of all levels will:

  • learn about the variety of resources available in the Smithsonian Learning Lab.
  • experiment with story-boarding techniques for creative writing.
  • learn how to record and edit an audio file.
  • be supported in the selection of images and the production of a short video.
  • reflect on the Digital Storytelling 5-steps process
  • practice oral and written English language skills
  • enhance identity through personal stories
  • strengthen intergenerational family bond
  • increase visual literacy through close looking at art

_______________________________________________________________

This workshop is part of the research project "Storying the Cultural Heritage: Digital Storytelling as a tool to enhance the 4Cs in formal and informal learning" led by Dr Antonia Liguori, appointed as a Smithsonian Fellow with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access (SCLDA) from March 1 to June 30 2018, and is funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council UK under the International Placement Scheme. Over the next months, Dr Antonia Liguori, in collaboration with Dr Philippa Rappoportwho has agreed to serve as principal mentor/advisor during Dr Liguori’s appointment – will work with Fairfax County Public School Family Literacy and Parent Leadership Programs to explore the use of Digital Storytelling in combination with the digital resources of the Smithsonian Learning Lab. 

Antonia Liguori
35
 

"The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian" Close-Reading: Making Text-to-Art Connections

The selected artwork and learning lab collection offers a historical approach to the transformation of Native Americans into white culture and society. It serves as a purpose to provoke discussion on the historical context of the Indian Removal Act, and gives students an understanding of the main character’s (from the novel "The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian) “modern day” internal conflict of erasing or eliminating his Native American culture to immerse into the lifestyle of a white teenager in a predominately white school.

As an introductory activity, students will engage in the see/think/wonder methodology to infer the artists’ purpose for the artwork. This initial activity will help scaffold students’ prior understanding and knowledge of the historical context of Native American history and the forced immersion into white culture. Therefore, after students have had ample time of using visual understanding skills to interpret the artwork, students can explore a “modern-day version” of Sherman Alexie’s image that showcases a juxtaposition of the main character’s internal identity conflict.Similar to the artwork, students will engage in the "connect, extend, and challenge" thinking activity. Students will make connections to the text and real-world connections as a culminating task. Lastly, students will discuss how it extended their thinking and a remaining challenge or wonder students still have. Using their remaining questions, this could lead to several extension activities.

Students can explore other Native American artwork in the learning lab, students can also use the "unveiling stories" strategy to learn more about the Carlisle school. The history of the Carlisle school connects and relates with the novel by adding historical context. Lastly, students can engage in teacher-made or student-made gallery walks using other Native American artwork or imagery to support the reading process of the paired text.


Jacquie Lapple
16
 

"The Things They Carried," by Tim O'Brien

This collection reflects the works of art included in the Smithsonian American Art Museum's exhibit: “Artists Respond: American Art and the Vietnam War, 1965-1975."    #SAAMTeach

Annette Spahr
24
 

"The World of Your Senses": Parallel Perspectives from Tibetan Buddhism and Western Science on Sensory Perception

"The World of Your Senses" shares parallel perspectives from Tibetan Buddhism and western science on sensory perception. This collection explores the questions: How do we see? How does hearing work? How do we perceive smell? How does taste function? How do we sense touch? In addition, the Buddhist perspective includes a sixth sense... mind consciousness!

"The World of Your Senses" is the result of many years of work growing out of directives from His Holiness the Dalai Lama and his long history engaging Western scientists in dialogue. The script, content, and imagery were envisioned by a dedicated and curiosity-filled group of thirty Tibetan Buddhist monastics-in-exile from monasteries and nunneries in India, through the "Science for Monks and Nuns" program. The creation of the physical exhibit, launched in 2010, was supported through a unique collaboration between the Library of Tibetan Works and Archives (LWTA in Dharamsala, India), the Sager Family Foundation, the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. (SCEMS/SCLDA & OEC/Smithsonian Exhibitions), and the Exploratorium in San Francisco. It has since traveled to the United States, Nepal, and Bhutan.

The resource is bi-lingual: English and Tibetan.

RELATED COLLECTIONS:

Senses Series – Sight in Humans and Animals      (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/n2f39XxkfBRJeHPk)

Senses Series – Hearing      (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/7EbVTM49NgWiGrzA)

Senses Series – Smell      (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/7LjjBHybUk9HE8Wj)

Senses Series – Taste     (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/2w7r7PVoAgghiYmL)

Senses Series – Touch     (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/oon5rHojeyrEwNEE)


This collection is based Science For Monks, World of Your Senses (2010).

Tracie Spinale
28
 

"Votes for Women!" A Comparative Look at British and US Suffrage Movements

The resources in this collection provide a comparative look into the similarities and differences of the Suffrage Movements in both the UK and the US. 

Emily Surman
19
 

"Water Matters" Online Conference Series: Archive and Illustration Summaries

This online conference series invites educators and students to take an active role in global environmental issues around water. Learn from experts in the field, share ideas, and collaborate with people around the world who, like you, are committed to solving environmental challenges. Includes illustration summaries and the archive of each session, with interdisciplinary connections to water issues . Original Airdates: Spring 2012
Ashley Naranjo
42
 

"We Didn't Start The Fire": World Headlines, 1949-1989

"We Didn't Start the Fire" is a song by Billy Joel. Its lyrics include brief, rapid-fire allusions to more than 100 headline events between 1949, the year of Joel's birth, and 1989, when the song was released. This topical collection and image gallery represents references in the song. What makes these events headlines? What events does Joel leave out? How do these resources reflect the headlines, ideas, and concerns addressed by Joel? 

sheishistoric
99
 

"We the People": Flash Card Activity and Template

This collection includes a variety of resources on the theme, "We the People," a template document  for teachers to create their own  flashcard activity with Learning Lab images, and strategies to use them.

This collection was created for the 2018 cohort of the Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program on the theme, "We the People: America's Grand and Radical Experiment with Democracy." But anyone can use it.

Strategies: Begin by selecting your own set of images. (Feel free to copy this collection and then adapt as you like.) When creating your flashcards, use the template from the last learning tile, and add relevant text diagonally below the object. Print double-sided flipping on the SHORT side.

After distributing the cards, have students select one or two that speak to them. Then have them discuss the following questions in groups and share out.

Supporting Questions:
What themes do you see?
Do you see these themes across the objects and over time?

Essential Questions:
Using these images, define American Democracy.
What other resources might you use to tell a fuller story?


Keywords: #MCteach


Philippa Rappoport
50
 

"Words can lie or clarify" by Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga

In 1981, Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga submitted a memorandum on the subject “Use of term ‘concentration camps’” to the executive director of the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians (CWRIC). Included in this collection is background information on the Japanese American Incarceration era and Executive Order 9066, alongside Herzig-Yoshinaga's own words. In response to reading through this memorandum, students can apply Project Zero Thinking Routines to what they already know about the Japanese American Incarceration era and what interests them for further research. Additionally, students can begin to connect ideas from Herzig-Yoshinaga's memorandum to artifacts, documents and photographs of the era, noting especially the nuances in the meaning of words used and interpret some of these euphemisms in context.

#APA2018

Related collection of interest around language found within the Civilian Exclusion Order: Document Analysis: Civilian Exclusion Order and Japanese American Incarceration During WWII

Ashley Naranjo
50
 

"¡Pleibol!”: Close Looking to Explore One Family’s Story of Latino Baseball

This teaching collection helps students to look closely and think critically by using three Thinking Routines to explore the cultural relevance of one family's baseball-related objects from an exhibition at the National Museum of American History, "¡Pleibol!: In the Barrios and the Big Leagues." The exhibition seeks to document the history of Latino culture through the lens of baseball, and explores baseball not only as a pastime close to the hearts of many people in many communities, but also for Latinos as a place to advocate for rights and social justice. 

Finally, the prompts aid students in looking closely at a personal object of their choice and teasing out the story it tells.

Included here are the objects themselves, a bilingual video with curator Margaret Salazar-Porzio, three suggested Thinking Routines - "See, Think, Wonder," "The 3 Y's," and "Picture Writing" - from Harvard's Project Zero Artful Thinking and Global Thinking materials, and supporting digital content about the exhibition. 

For use in Social Studies, Spanish, English, and American History classes

#LatinoHAC #EthnicStudies



Philippa Rappoport
14
 

#BecauseOfHerStory: Exploring Untold Stories through Portraiture and American Art

This collection features resources related to a November 22, 2019 session presented at the National Council for the Social Studies (NCSS) annual conference. 

Learn how American art and portraiture can bring diverse women’s stories into your classroom, connecting with themes you may already teach. Discover strategies for engaging your students in close looking and critical thinking across disciplines.  #SAAMTeach #NPGteach

RELATED WEBINAR SERIES (recordings available): https://americanart.si.edu/education/k-12/professional-development/webinars

This project received support from the Smithsonian American Women’s History Initiative. To learn more, visit the Smithsonian American Women History Initiative website. #BecauseOfHerStory


Phoebe Hillemann
19
 

#NPGteach The Ladies In and Out of the White House: Not Just A Pretty Face

Looking closely at the women married to our President's. Learn more about the individuals and the contributions they themselves made. Using Learning to Look Strategies to go beyond the pretty faces.

Nancy Gavrish
18
 

#Teaching Inquiry - Ancient Rome Daily Life

#TeachingInquiry

Use evidence from a collection of items from Ancient Rome to draw conclusions on the daily life of Roman Citizens. Link your thinking to your learning about the social classes of Rome and who may have used the detailed items. Consider the following questions in your investigation

1.Are routines in daily life influenced by Social Status?

2. Compare the daily life of Ancient Roman Patricians with Plebeians or Slaves

3. What are some of your daily routines?

4. Compare using a 3 circle venn diagram your daily routines with Ancient Rome and Serah/Ethiopia P53 from your textbook

5. How do daily routines change from place to place?

6. Does government structure influence daily life for individuals?  Discuss with reference to Ancient Rome.

Brooke Tonev
21
 

1619 to the American Civil Rights Movement

This collection brings together the New York Times Podcast 1619 (Episode 1, "The Fight for a True Democracy") and Smithsonian resources to support my 7th graders as we begin our unit on the American Civil Rights Movement. Later in the unit, the students will read March, a graphic novel based on the experience of Congressman John Lewis during the Civil Rights Movement. In order for the students to understand why the Civil Rights Movement was necessary, they must first understand the history that led to it. This collection does not, by any means, provide a complete or comprehensive history. The podcast provides an historical overview and will serve as a jumping off point for further research. The visual artwork, poetry, articles, and films included at the end serve to provide additional perspectives and opportunities for exploration. The students will develop their own research questions inspired by the thinking they've done throughout this collection and may use the additional resources provided to begin their independent research. A PowerPoint lesson on developing research questions is included.

The collection is organized into five lessons, each following the same structure: Students will listen to a portion of the podcast and use Think, Puzzle, Explore to document their thinking and record questions for further research. They will also explore a piece of visual art using Ten Times Two and Unveiling Stories. The sixth lesson brings the students from history to the present and asks them to consider the 2014 artwork New Age of Slavery by Patrick Campbell using Ten Times Two and Unveiling Stories. 

#goglobal

Marissa McCauley
99
 

17th Century Fashion and Trends

Colonial America was characterized by intensely detailed and heavy clothing. Details were emphasized greatly on clothing because it displayed elegance and power. Detailed clothes were worn by the wealthy upper class group due to how expensive it was to get them.  Some of the most important pieces included big gowns, big hair, ruffled collars, heavy jewelry and corsets to shape women's waist. Men also styled ruffled collars, fancy hats, and working shoes. Class separated high end fashion from common fashion. Most of the items displayed below were made for the middle to upper class group.

Ailyn Castillo
12
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