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Found 1,274 Collections

 

"...Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death!"

This teaching collection includes resources such as postage stamps, artworks and dramatic readings related to Patrick Henry, a Founding Father of the United States, who famously ended his speech at the Virginia Convention on March 23, 1775, with the phrase "...give me liberty or give me death." Also included are suggested Speech Analysis Questions from ReadWriteThink to support careful examination of Henry's speeches. Guiding Question: How did this speech inspire change in the colonies? Use textual evidence to support your answer.
Ashley Naranjo
8
 

"Diary, December 12, 1941": Japanese American Internment, Propaganda, and Superheroes

This folder contains a lesson concept, lesson materials, related Project Zero thinking routines, and some optional related / extension resources for a six-day middle school unit that explores Japanese-American internment and WWII government propaganda through Roger Shimomura's "Diary, December 12, 1941." This collection is intended for teachers and can be modified to fit a shorter or longer period of time.  #SAAMteach

#historicalthinking

Alexandra Hartley
19
 

"Let Women Fly!": Female Aviators and Astronauts

Did you know that astronaut Mae Jemison carried a picture of aviator Bessie Coleman in her uniform pocket? Or that astronaut Sally Ride was a major supporter of vice presidential candidate Geraldine Ferraro? Maybe you knew that Jane Briggs Hart was Michigan's first female helicopter pilot and flew her husband, the late Senator Hart, to his political campaign stops as well as being vocal and liberal political activist? Find out about these inspirational women and others in this collection. This topical collection is a great starting point for research about female aviators and astronauts, and includes articles, images, artifacts, and video. Some guiding questions to consider might be:
-Why do you think it was so challenging for female pilots to become accepted? Compare the inclusion of women in aviation to other industries and fields.
-What role did the military play in the growth in the number of female aviators?
-What connections can you find between various female pilots and astronauts?
-Is being the "first" of something a political act? How do many female aviation leaders use their public voice?

#BecauseOfHerStory

Kate Harris
48
 

"Nightstand Portraits": A Burton Morris-inspired Activity

This teaching resource collection includes an activity, (created by the Heinz History Center's Education Manager, Mariruth Leftwich), highlighting Pittsburgh-native pop artist Burton Morris' "Nightstand Portraits" series as a springboard for students to create their own imaginary "Nightstand Portrait". This could be a portrait of themselves, a historical figure, or even an icebreaker activity for students to introduce each other to the rest of the class.
Ashley Naranjo
8
 

"Ohhh.. The Wondeful Timelessness of Women"

As time goes by, we evolve and old ways become replaced with new ways of thinking. The American revolution consisted of a time when women went by patriarchal views and values. During this time women were taught men were the head of the household and were in power and more important.

Although, as time passes we saw women standing up for themselves. We saw women claiming more and asking for more. I wanna explore a topic not talked about enough and that is the significance that the patriarchal role had on making women feel inadequate and therefore contributing to this magnified role in the American revolution. In my collection, I will showcase artifacts and pieces of evidence exhibiting how women's inferior social class still plays an amplified role in the revolution.

Sierra Walker
10
 

"Pertenecer": Using Museum Objects to Prompt Stories and Explore Sense of Place and Belonging

Pertenecer is a digital storytelling workshop that enhances the 4Cs (Creativity, Critical thinking, Collaboration, Communication) and improves digital literacy.  In this three-day workshop participants attending Fairfax County Public School Family Literacy and/or the Parent Leadership programs will use museum objects as prompts to create videos of personal stories. No technical experience is necessary, but participants of all levels will:

  • learn about the variety of resources available in the Smithsonian Learning Lab.
  • experiment with story-boarding techniques for creative writing.
  • learn how to record and edit an audio file.
  • be supported in the selection of images and the production of a short video.
  • reflect on the Digital Storytelling 5-steps process
  • practice oral and written English language skills
  • enhance identity through personal stories
  • strengthen intergenerational family bond
  • increase visual literacy through close looking at art

_______________________________________________________________

This workshop is part of the research project "Storying the Cultural Heritage: Digital Storytelling as a tool to enhance the 4Cs in formal and informal learning" led by Dr Antonia Liguori, appointed as a Smithsonian Fellow with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access (SCLDA) from March 1 to June 30 2018, and is funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council UK under the International Placement Scheme. Over the next months, Dr Antonia Liguori, in collaboration with Dr Philippa Rappoportwho has agreed to serve as principal mentor/advisor during Dr Liguori’s appointment – will work with Fairfax County Public School Family Literacy and Parent Leadership Programs to explore the use of Digital Storytelling in combination with the digital resources of the Smithsonian Learning Lab. 

Antonia Liguori
35
 

"The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian" Close-Reading: Making Text-to-Art Connections

The selected artwork and learning lab collection offers a historical approach to the transformation of Native Americans into white culture and society. It serves as a purpose to provoke discussion on the historical context of the Indian Removal Act, and gives students an understanding of the main character’s (from the novel "The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian) “modern day” internal conflict of erasing or eliminating his Native American culture to immerse into the lifestyle of a white teenager in a predominately white school.

As an introductory activity, students will engage in the see/think/wonder methodology to infer the artists’ purpose for the artwork. This initial activity will help scaffold students’ prior understanding and knowledge of the historical context of Native American history and the forced immersion into white culture. Therefore, after students have had ample time of using visual understanding skills to interpret the artwork, students can explore a “modern-day version” of Sherman Alexie’s image that showcases a juxtaposition of the main character’s internal identity conflict.Similar to the artwork, students will engage in the "connect, extend, and challenge" thinking activity. Students will make connections to the text and real-world connections as a culminating task. Lastly, students will discuss how it extended their thinking and a remaining challenge or wonder students still have. Using their remaining questions, this could lead to several extension activities.

Students can explore other Native American artwork in the learning lab, students can also use the "unveiling stories" strategy to learn more about the Carlisle school. The history of the Carlisle school connects and relates with the novel by adding historical context. Lastly, students can engage in teacher-made or student-made gallery walks using other Native American artwork or imagery to support the reading process of the paired text.


Jacquie Lapple
16
 

"The World of Your Senses": Parallel Perspectives from Tibetan Buddhism and Western Science on Sensory Perception

"The World of Your Senses" shares parallel perspectives from Tibetan Buddhism and western science on sensory perception. This collection explores the questions: How do we see? How does hearing work? How do we perceive smell? How does taste function? How do we sense touch? In addition, the Buddhist perspective includes a sixth sense... mind consciousness!

"The World of Your Senses" is the result of many years of work growing out of directives from His Holiness the Dalai Lama and his long history engaging Western scientists in dialogue. The script, content, and imagery were envisioned by a dedicated and curiosity-filled group of thirty Tibetan Buddhist monastics-in-exile from monasteries and nunneries in India, through the "Science for Monks and Nuns" program. The creation of the physical exhibit, launched in 2010, was supported through a unique collaboration between the Library of Tibetan Works and Archives (LWTA in Dharamsala, India), the Sager Family Foundation, the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. (SCEMS/SCLDA & OEC/Smithsonian Exhibitions), and the Exploratorium in San Francisco. It has since traveled to the United States, Nepal, and Bhutan.

The resource is bi-lingual: English and Tibetan.

RELATED COLLECTIONS:

Senses Series – Sight in Humans and Animals      (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/n2f39XxkfBRJeHPk)

Senses Series – Hearing      (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/7EbVTM49NgWiGrzA)

Senses Series – Smell      (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/7LjjBHybUk9HE8Wj)

Senses Series – Taste     (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/2w7r7PVoAgghiYmL)

Senses Series – Touch     (http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/oon5rHojeyrEwNEE)


This collection is based Science For Monks, World of Your Senses (2010).

Tracie Spinale
28
 

"Votes for Women!" A Comparative Look at British and US Suffrage Movements

The resources in this collection provide a comparative look into the similarities and differences of the Suffrage Movements in both the UK and the US. 

Emily Surman
19
 

"Water Matters" Online Conference Series: Archive and Illustration Summaries

This online conference series invites educators and students to take an active role in global environmental issues around water. Learn from experts in the field, share ideas, and collaborate with people around the world who, like you, are committed to solving environmental challenges. Includes illustration summaries and the archive of each session, with interdisciplinary connections to water issues . Original Airdates: Spring 2012
Ashley Naranjo
42
 

"We Didn't Start The Fire": World Headlines, 1949-1989

"We Didn't Start the Fire" is a song by Billy Joel. Its lyrics include brief, rapid-fire allusions to more than 100 headline events between 1949, the year of Joel's birth, and 1989, when the song was released. This topical collection and image gallery represents references in the song. What makes these events headlines? What events does Joel leave out? How do these resources reflect the headlines, ideas, and concerns addressed by Joel? 

sheishistoric
99
 

"We the People": Flash Card Activity and Template

This collection includes a variety of resources on the theme, "We the People," a template document  for teachers to create their own  flashcard activity with Learning Lab images, and strategies to use them.

This collection was created for the 2018 cohort of the Smithsonian-Montgomery College Faculty Fellowship Program on the theme, "We the People: America's Grand and Radical Experiment with Democracy." But anyone can use it.

Strategies: Begin by selecting your own set of images. (Feel free to copy this collection and then adapt as you like.) When creating your flashcards, use the template from the last learning tile, and add relevant text diagonally below the object. Print double-sided flipping on the SHORT side.

After distributing the cards, have students select one or two that speak to them. Then have them discuss the following questions in groups and share out.

Supporting Questions:
What themes do you see?
Do you see these themes across the objects and over time?

Essential Questions:
Using these images, define American Democracy.
What other resources might you use to tell a fuller story?


Keywords: #MCteach


Philippa Rappoport
50
 

"Words can lie or clarify" by Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga

In 1981, Aiko Herzig-Yoshinaga submitted a memorandum on the subject “Use of term ‘concentration camps’” to the executive director of the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians (CWRIC). Included in this collection is background information on the Japanese American Incarceration era and Executive Order 9066, alongside Herzig-Yoshinaga's own words. In response to reading through this memorandum, students can apply Project Zero Thinking Routines to what they already know about the Japanese American Incarceration era and what interests them for further research. Additionally, students can begin to connect ideas from Herzig-Yoshinaga's memorandum to artifacts, documents and photographs of the era, noting especially the nuances in the meaning of words used and interpret some of these euphemisms in context.

#APA2018

Related collection of interest around language found within the Civilian Exclusion Order: Document Analysis: Civilian Exclusion Order and Japanese American Incarceration During WWII

Ashley Naranjo
50
 

#NPGteach The Ladies In and Out of the White House: Not Just A Pretty Face

Looking closely at the women married to our President's. Learn more about the individuals and the contributions they themselves made. Using Learning to Look Strategies to go beyond the pretty faces.

Nancy Gavrish
18
 

#Teaching Inquiry - Ancient Rome Daily Life

#TeachingInquiry

Use evidence from a collection of items from Ancient Rome to draw conclusions on the daily life of Roman Citizens. Link your thinking to your learning about the social classes of Rome and who may have used the detailed items. Consider the following questions in your investigation

1.Are routines in daily life influenced by Social Status?

2. Compare the daily life of Ancient Roman Patricians with Plebeians or Slaves

3. What are some of your daily routines?

4. Compare using a 3 circle venn diagram your daily routines with Ancient Rome and Serah/Ethiopia P53 from your textbook

5. How do daily routines change from place to place?

6. Does government structure influence daily life for individuals?  Discuss with reference to Ancient Rome.

Brooke Tonev
21
 

17th Century Fashion and Trends

Colonial America was characterized by intensely detailed and heavy clothing. Details were emphasized greatly on clothing because it displayed elegance and power. Detailed clothes were worn by the wealthy upper class group due to how expensive it was to get them.  Some of the most important pieces included big gowns, big hair, ruffled collars, heavy jewelry and corsets to shape women's waist. Men also styled ruffled collars, fancy hats, and working shoes. Class separated high end fashion from common fashion. Most of the items displayed below were made for the middle to upper class group.

Ailyn Castillo
12
 

17th Century Fashion and Trends

Colonial America was characterized by intensely detailed and heavy clothing. Details were emphasized greatly on clothing because it displayed elegance and power. Detailed clothes were worn by the wealthy upper class group due to how expensive it was to get them.  Some of the most important pieces included big gowns, big hair, ruffled collars, heavy jewelry and corsets to shape women's waist. Men also styled ruffled collars, fancy hats, and working shoes. Most of the items displayed below were made for the middle to upper class group.

Ailyn Castillo
10
 

17th Century Virginian Culture

The Seventeenth century began in 1607 and ended in 1776. This colonial period marked a very significant event in the US with the founding of the first English settlers at Jamestown. The seventeenth century ended with the establishment of the commonwealth of Virginia.  It really made a significant impact of the base of early American culture.  This time period saw the beginning of early colonization and the beginning of mainstream things that are modified and used later. 

During this time period, Virigians were very well rooted in enjoying a nice and lively cultural life. In which, this lively cultural life paved the way for early development of the United States.  The following items in this collection represent the lively culture of the Virginians during the 17th century. The collection touches on the the entertainment culture religion , and personal items that were used during this time period that symbolizes early Virginian culture.

lauryn dunmyer
10
 

1812: A Nation Emerges

The War of 1812 was a military conflict that forged America's destiny to emerge as a strong nation. The war lasted less than two years but it was celebrated as the, "second war of independence" from Great Britain.
Linda Muller
23
 

1875 Civil Rights Movement

This Collection has some of the minor and major things that had to do with the 1875 Civil Rights Movement. It was big part of the Reconstruction Era, although failed to succeed as an effective "constitutional" law until 1964. So what do you do if your nation just fought and killed off over half a million soldiers of their own and demolished each other as best as they could which almost cause the whole nation to split into two different counties, along side that the President was recently assassinated? Easy. Well you try and fix it. The diverse difference in belief of rights between the union and confederate states made it a difficult adjustment to unite as one nation without more conflict after the Civil War. After Abraham Lincoln was assassinated by John Wilkes Booth, Vice President Andrew Johnson took over. Although Johnson was a southerner himself and was a racist bastard, he attempted to reconstruct the south and build “equal” AGAIN I SAY EQUAL rights for blacks. By that I mean putting only white people in the “reconstructed” governments. He gave no land to the black people, and lacked on protecting and proceeding their civil right laws. Anyways.. There was obviously a lot of conflict between the two races over land and just straight up discrimination all over the place. In response to this they tried to reconstruct a civil rights act multiple times, which leads me to the Civil Rights Act of 1875.  The Civil Rights Act of 1875 was signed by President Ulysses S. Grant to protect all citizens and their civil and legal rights, which outlawed segregation by giving everyone equal access to public places. Grant signed it as a federal law. If you did not obey this law, the consequences varied from being put in jail for 30 days or paying a fine of $500-$1000 dollars while being trailed at the Supreme Court. It was an extremely controversial topic. The Southern states did not obeyed by it. When the Civil Rights Act of 1875 was passed was believed to be supported under the 13th and 14th Amendments. (13th Amendment- prohibits slavery, 14th Amendment- all persons born or naturalized in the United States are American including African Americans). Pretty much the law just fell apart over time. It was declared by the Supreme Court unconstitutional in 1883. The Civil Rights Act of 1875 was the last attempt of the government to create a successful Civil Rights Movement until the year of 1965. 

Ashley Lazaro
3
 

18th & 19th century: Slavery in the American South

Upon arriving in America, families taken from Africa were separated and stripped of their identities. Slaves were now identified as their owner's property and forced to work in extreme conditions. Women took on roles outside of field labor, helping caretake and mother the children of their master's instead of their own. After, the decline of tobacco, the invention of the cotton gin helped to increase the production of cotton, making slaves more valuable to southern colonists. However, in the late 18th century, the abolitionist movement began in the North; this became the start of a divide between the North and South. The North had transitioned industrially and had withdrawn from the institution of slavery while the South continued to thrive and profit from it.

By 1840, Southern slaves were growing most of the world's cotton. However, most if not all slaves hated their living conditions becoming increasingly rebellious by working slowly or escaping North. The Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 also known as the Compromise of 1850, soon came into effect after slaves began to flee from the South to the North successfully. The law required the government to return fugitive slaves who escaped from their Southern owner's. This legislation further carried the conversation of the morality of slavery. Northern abolitionists continued to fight for the freedom of slaves further increasing animosity with the less progressive South. Shortly after, the Civil War would take place, denouncing the practice of slavery forever. Slavery is an inhumane system that exploited human beings and destroyed their identity.  This exhibit contains images and objects pertaining to this period of slavery in the American South.


Sources

1. Dattel, E. R. (2008, June). Cotton and the Civil War . Retrieved from http://mshistorynow.mdah.state...

2. Social Welfare History Project (2011). Fugitive Slave Act of 1850. Social Welfare History Project. Retrieved from http://socialwelfare.library.v...

3. Abolitionist Movement. (2009). Retrieved from http://www.history.com/topics/...


Subria Rivers
10
 

18th Century Vanity in America

This collection moves through the products and ideas that shaped beauty standards in  18th century America. Vanity was just as important for men and women in the 18th century as it is today. Early Americans were greatly influenced by Europe, whether that be religious ideas, architecture, fashion, alcohol, or weapons. One shared idea was beauty standards. In the 18th century Americas views on luxury goods came directly from England and France especially fashion and cosmetics. I have collected ten images showing the use of beauty products used through out the 18th century. 

Kaila Smith
11
 

1920's and 1930's Artifacts

The purpose of this project is to demonstrate what I believe are the most important events of the 1920's and 1930's. As I will revel by using artifacts from each decade to represent the importance.

Jenna Bonker
10
 

1920's and 1930's Artifacts

Goal of this project is to discover 10 artifacts total of severe importance to the 1920's and the 1930's, 5 from the 20's and 5 from the 30's and for each Artifact describe the importance in a paragraph. 

Connor Woods
10
1-24 of 1,274 Collections