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Found 556 Collections

 

People, Place and Time: How Art Reflects Culture - Caja De Memoria Viva II: Constancia Colón de Clemente by Adrián Román (

In this collection, designed for a Spanish-speaking classroom, students will explore how art reflects culture when analyzing “Caja De Memoria Viva II: Constancia Colón de Clemente” by Adrian “Viajero” Román. In this three-dimensional multimedia installation, the artist portrays a black Puerto Rican woman who migrated to the United States in the 1940s. This portrait allows the artist (in his own words) “ to embark on a quest to visually represent how precious our memories are and capture the dignity in the people’s struggle and validate their existence.” The collection includes a teacher's guide in English and suggested authentic resources both in Spanish and English to be adapted by teachers of multiple disciplines. 

 Students will observe and analyze this three dimensional work of art and they will describe both its exterior and interior. Students will create their own box to reflect their heritage and personal story or that of a Hispanic figure.

This collection is one of three that explore “People, Place, and Time: How Art Reflects Culture.” Products, practices and perspectives displayed in Latinx art, show how our place and history (past) influence who we are (present) and who we want to be (future) in geographical, social, economic, and/or historical contexts. In the three collections, Latin American works of art illustrate how culture shapes the way we see the world, others, and ourselves, and they also raise awareness about Latinx diversity.

The three collections were created by Marcela Velikovsky (Bullis School) and Vicky Masson (Christ Episcopal School) as part of the  2018 Smithsonian Virtual Teacher Curricula Creation Opportunity with the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access (SCLDA), and thanks to the Smithsonian Latino Center's Latino Initiative Pool Funds. The three collections highlight Latino history, art and culture,and use Harvard Project Zero Thinking Routines and Global Thinking Routines strategies.

The Smithsonian Learning Lab collections provide an opportunity to invigorate the World Language (Foreign Language) curriculum as it allows to effectively integrate online museum resources (authentic resources) towards a 21st century curriculum. They facilitate student-centered activities within a variety of themes such as, family and communities, personal and public identities, social values and customs, holidays and celebrations, immigration, ethnic groups, Hispanic Heritage,  image and stereotypes, inequality and discrimination, global issues, religious practices, etc. They also provide the opportunity to analyze art, read portraiture, and investigate art media.

These collections also consider ACTFL standards (Communication, Connections, Comparisons, Communities and Culture), Asia Society Global Competence skills, the Sustainable Development Goals (Global Goals), Teaching Tolerance Social Justice standards, the Framework for Developing Global and Cultural Competencies to Advance Equity, Excellence and Economic competitiveness, and Participate Global Competencies.

# National Portrait Gallery  #The Outwin # Adrián “Viajero” Román # Caja de Memoria Viva II # Spanish # Puerto Rico # New York # Empathy # Inequality # Critical thinking # Curiosity # Heritage # Stories #LatinoHAC


Tracy Zarodnansky
45
 

"The Raven," by Edgar Allan Poe

I use this specific "Raven" lesson with 10th grade American Lit students who have some prior knowledge of Poe. This particular class has already read "The Tell Tale Heart," additionally, they have a strong understanding of the qualities associated with Dark Romantic style - having read The Scarlet Letter and Young Goodman Brown, in addition to The Tell Tale Heart. This particular poem also comes on the heals of completing the Emily Dickinson unit, so therefore they have a good grasp of what is required when you're explicating a poem, what steps to follow, etc. This particular "Raven" lesson takes approximately two 45 minute class periods. Step by step for the lesson is featured below in the "notes" section.  #SAAMTeach

Annette Spahr
7
 

Artists and Feminism

Women in mid-twentieth century and after made an enormous impact not only in arts, but also in literary forms.  

Matisse's Tea, which starts this collection shows the contrasting use of color, pattern, and line on Marguerite and Henriette creating a feeling of imbalance in the piece. This piece confronts the viewer with the tension between restraint and nature.

This tension is taken to  a different form in the artists displayed here.

Simone de Beauvoir, uses in promoting feminism, according to Simone de Beauvoir, women do not choose to think about their bodies and bodily processes negatively; rather they are forced to do so as a result of being embedded in a hostile patriarchal society. Andy Warhol , creator of Pop Art, used multiple images of American icon, Marilyn Monroe to produce art. 

Another artist, Judy Chicago wanted to demonstrate women's achievements through history in the collaborated installation The Dinner Party. Her goal was to ensure that this tribute to women becomes a permanent part of our cultural heritage.


bbridgette
6
 

The Women Who Made a Difference

This collection represents the women of the Ancient Times who made a difference in their respective civilizations.

Those female figures held powerful roles, and played significantly influential parts in the domains traditionally held by men. Their names are still known today.

Enheduanna, the earliest known poet, helped her father to unite the Akkadians and the Sumerians through poetry, while Sappho, brought us a lyrical poetry, she would talk about love, feelings, and woman (from a woman’s point of view). Her poetry was unlike others; previous and current poets at the time were male and wrote about events that focused on the Gods and men in general.

Queen Nefertiti together with her husband united Egyptian people under one god, the Sun God.

Cleopatra, the last Pharaoh of Egypt, secured her position—and her Egypt’s independence—through her influence over Roman leaders Julius Caesar and Mark Antony, some of the most powerful Western men of the time

Artemisia of Halicarnassus, also known as Artemisia I of Caria, is credited with persuading Persian King Xerxes to abandon his invasion of Greece.

As we can see, ancient history has many strong female figures, and their names echo down history to the present day.

bbridgette
7
 

Women and Their Literary Work in the Middle Ages

During the Middle Ages, the Church exerted the greatest influence over how women were perceived, women did not have the opportunity to raise as warriors or queens as in the Ancient Times. 

The two main alternatives for a medieval woman were to marry, or to 'take the veil' and become a nun. Almost all female orders required women to live behind the walls of a monastery or within an individual cell, living a life of contemplation, prayer and work. However, there were some women, who broke with the traditional roles assigned to them in several ways during a time when women had no legal rights and were considered a man's property.

Take Heloise for example, she scandalized the 12th century France by having an love affair with her tutor. The letters she exchanged with Abelard  are being read to this day, through them we follow their tragic and passionate love affair. Another women, Hildegard of Bingen is known for her writings and music, her music is still performed today, and her spiritual works are read as examples of a feminine interpretation of church and spiritual ideas. 

Marie de France, was considered the most revolutionary writer of her time, as it was not common practice for women to author any texts at all, and so was Christine de Pizan, who become the first women to support herself and her children through writing after her husband died and she was left alone.

I have also included a fictional character in this collection, Sheharazad, the narrator of The One Thousand and One Nights.  The female characters in the stories fight to make their own choices and live according to their beliefs about freedom, sexuality, and love, as the other women in this collection.













bbridgette
6
 

Media/US Involvement with the Holocaust

The tragic killings of the Jews was largely ignored by journalists during the Holocaust due to the widespread anti semitism that flourished during this time. A surprising percentage of Americans openly displayed their opposition to the Jews. Private schools, camps, colleges, resorts, and places of employment all imposed restrictions and quotas against Jews, often quite blatantly. Influential figures such as Henry Ford criticized their character and patriotism. At their peak, the Bund held a rally in Madison Square Garden packed with 20,000 people to hear speeches, which was largely covered by prominent newspapers. Other newspapers justify their lack of coverage due to the "ambiguous information" supplied. The huge death polls given to them was simply too insufferable for them to believe. In some cases, they would report on them on neglected parts of the newspaper which were not seen by many. However there is reason to believe they knew much more about the Holocaust than what they printed. Although the Holocaust deserved more attention then given, Jewish newspapers reported the truths of the genocide in an effort to gain support by exposure. In some findings, newspapers covered the Jewish tragedies with sympathy through photographs, stamps, and cartoons. American media’s disregard for the magnitude of the genocide at the time is relevant when looking at the context and environment in which these were published. With the rising population of Neo-Nazis, it evident that we have forgotten “never forget”. With the help of education and awareness of the Holocaust, it will ensure a terror like this will never happen again.

Josephine Seifert
18
 

National Parks Research Project

National Parks are for us to explore. The goal is to learn about the National Parks of your choice and find out as much information as possible. As we explore the national parks remember to preserve the ecosystems and wildlife along the way.

Angela Caschera
12
 

Perfume: The Story of a Murderer (Launch activity; close reading; and writing assignment)

This collection is used to launch the novel "Perfume: The Story of a Murderer." This is a novel which nearly defies categorization. Suskind, the writer ventures into a creative territory few students read in high school. Instead of beginning the unit with general background and context about the novel, we begin from an emotional point - - what emotions and experiences are prompted by the setting, mood, atmosphere, etc.? Below are the general steps we follow:                           #SAAMteach

1. Pairs of students are each given two different paintings (I have a very small class - 12 students - - and choose to give each group two in order to cover more; however, you could easily do this with a class of 24 and each group of two has one painting.)

2. Each group has a graphic organizer which is a modified "See/Think/Wonder" format, coupled with a brainstorming opportunity regarding the emotions generated by this painting. They're given approximately 10 minutes to work their way through the paintings and complete the lists for each, as they discuss, etc. I print out the pictures for them because I don't want them to see the titles and any additional information they may find online.

3. When they have about 10 minutes, the students each have an opportunity to walk their classmates through the paintings and then open up the floor for a discussion about the emotions conveyed through this work.

4. We keep a running list of these emotions on the board. Some that have surfaced include: confusion, disgust, loneliness, repugnance, helplessness, panic, anger, fear... Next to this list we wrote some overall concepts, such as abstract mixed with realism, abandonment, intimidation, and disconnect...

5. When completed, I'll lead the conversation to a discussion about how these very same emotions are reflected by and presented within the novel...but like the paintings, in very unique ways. I choose my words carefully so as not to give the entire first few chapters away, but at the same time, offering them a preview. We then read the first two paragraphs out loud, and discuss how so many of the elements noted on the board are present already.

6. They're then assigned Chapters 1, 2, and 3 to read, with a "list" of suggested items to watch for, annotate, etc. as they complete their first close reading of the novel. (This assignment is attached.)

7. Part II involves writing in response to one of the paintings, completed after students have read the novel. (See Google Doc directions)

Annette Spahr
15
 

1920s Artifacts

These artifacts really slapdizzled the 1920s.

Caleb armstrong
10
 

1920's Artifacts

To get artifacts that demonstrate the themes and purposes of the 1920s.
Nav Id
10
 

Math: Unstacked

UNSTACKED is a wonderful way to spark inquiry, analysis, and discussion. By visually exploring our images, you can bring the Smithsonian Libraries' collections into your classroom. Use UNSTACKED as a morning exercise, a way to introduce a new topic, or to discover your students' interests. Picture your world, dive into the stacks! 

The research and creation of this project was funded by the Gates Foundation Youth Access Grant.

Jamie Mauldin
10
 

The Things We Carry

These are some of the things that I carry with me in life and can act as a representation for who I am today. 

JAIDYN PEEBLES
3
 

Beauty and Truth: The Dust Bowl

This collection explores Alexandre Hogue's 1933 painting Dust Bowl through a global thinking routine called "Beauty and Truth." Supporting materials help build historical and scientific context.

“Some may feel that in these paintings . . . I may have chosen an unpleasant subject, but after all the [drought] is most unpleasant. To record its beautiful moments without its tragedy would be false indeed. At one and the same time the [drought] is beautiful in its effects and terrifying in its results. The former shows peace on the surface but the latter reveals tragedy underneath. Tragedy as I have used it is simply visual psychology, which is beautiful in a terrifying way.” -Alexandre Hogue


Phoebe Hillemann
11
 

Icarus

A collection aimed at studying different interpretations of the myth of Icarus. Students, as you view each piece, take note of how it represents both the poem we read "Musee de Beaux Arts" by WH Auden, and the painting "Landscape With the Fall of Icarus". What do you feel is missing? What does each piece of art include that others did not. Which one do you like the best? Why?

Jenni Fuller
5
 

The Women Who Made a Difference

This collections displays notable women from the ancient times who made an impact on history, starting with the first Queen of Egypt, Hatshepsut

Though most rulers in the ancient (and classical) world were men, some women wielded power and influence. 

Some ruled in their own name, some influenced their world as royal consorts, but they all made an impact during the ancient times.

bridgette
7
 

Vietnam War for novel The Things They Carried

This collection has images of the Vietnam War to background the novel The Things They Carried.     This collection should help to answer the compelling question; was the Vietnam War justified?

#TeachingInquiry

June Bohr
5
 

Exploring Multiple Perspectives with American Art (CATE 2019)

This collection was created for the 2019 CATE annual convention in Burlingame, California. 

We started by doing a close reading of Walt Whitman's "I Hear America Singing," followed by an analysis of two paintings using Project Zero Thinking Routines:

  1. Iceman Crucified #4, by Ralph Fasanella, using See, Think, Wonder
  2. Braceros, by Domingo Ulloa, using Step In, Step Out, Step Back

Returning to the poem, consider how different people we identified in the two paintings might react to the poem. Next, choose two perspectives from any of the texts (written or visual) we've looked at, and use the Two Voice Poem template to compare their points of view on work in America.

Reflection Question: What do we gain by considering multiple perspectives on an issue?

Phoebe Hillemann
6
 

The Things I (Emma) Carry

The things I carry

Emma Brannon
3
 

The Things We Carry

ASHLEY GILL
9
 

The things I (Raeann) Carry

Here are the small things in my life that I found weigh the most. 

RAEANN RORIE
3
 

Gender in Art

Let us stop for a minute and think of how gender is portrayed around the world. Women were always seen as the beautiful creatures who mainly relied on their beauty alone to get what they want/need. Men, on the other hand, are the strong tough guys who can take on anything with their incredible strength. The woman stays at home doing housework and cooking, while the man is out there in the world working hard to provide for his family. These are all things we were brought up to believe about the two genders. There is a clear divide between male and female. There always has been and there always will be. However, let's shift our brain to think about how gender is portrayed in different pieces of art. With art, we are able to visually see how each gender is portrayed differently. With nude statues, the males embrace their masculinity and can openly display themselves, while the women are always needing to be more secluded and have items such as cloth covering their more "intimate" parts. Men are also visually depicted as having great strong bodies which shows that they are supposed to be the dominant character, while when a woman poses it's more graceful. These are just a few examples of how the two differ. 

Through this collection we will be looking at various time periods. We will first be looking at Ancient Greek art, observing male and female nude statues, and again, seeing how they are portrayed differently. As mentioned earlier, men were fully nude while women were mildly nude. It was appropriate for women to bare some of their naked body, because women's bodies have always been seen as gracious and beautiful, but for a woman to be fully exposed would be distasteful. This concept is still seen in the modern day, for society has a problem with women showing so much skin and body and will get called derogatory names, while it's totally acceptable for a man to show all he wants. We will also see a little bit as to how men were sometimes held captive by a woman because women were portrayed as very manipulative and acting in the role of being a seductress to get what they wanted from a man with temptation. 

Taking a turn, but not a turn too far away from Ancient Greek art, we will be looking at the Renaissance era. Renaissance means rebirth, and many pieces of art show this. For women, they were shown as a little bit more chubby because in that time, being more voluptuous meant you were wealthy, and wealth was considered very beautiful. Not only wealth, but also fertility. Women are child bearers, they are bringing life into the world, and that is also a beautiful thing. Women were still viewed for their beauty, and men were still viewed for their strength, but they had more of an "athletic intelligent" portrayal. They were still strong and muscular, but they were shown to not only be physically strong, but also intelligent and healthy. The biggest difference from earlier times, though, is that women were starting to be more appreciated. I feel like they were getting more light shone on them and they were displayed with children a lot, and I believe that is to show the beauty of them being able to give life to new beings in the world. 

We'll also be taking a quick glance at a couple pieces of Baroque art in which women were appearing even more powerful and overshadowing men by showing that they could be just as strong as them. With women being so inferior to men in Ancient times, we can see how as times move on, they really want to grab the power from the man and become superior. 

The last collection features works of art that were created during the postmodernism era in the mid-late 20th century. During this time feminist art was a big thing and was becoming more popular. Women artists were becoming more recognized and feminist groups such as the Guerrilla Girls formed to fight things such as sexism and racism in art. Much of the art during this time was geared towards showing what women can do. There was a lot of female empowerment shown in the arts, really breaking that barrier between male and female, showing that a woman can do everything that a man can do. You'll notice that a few of these works are done by feminist activists and were made for the purpose of campaigning for women's rights. A big thing that's different about this collection of art compared to the other two is the fact that they are all geared towards women. The work of art by Winslow Homer is the only one that features a man, and even then, the man is not the important subject of it; the woman is. This is because during this era, again, feminism was booming. 

This collection is great for people who are interested in the subject of gender portrayals and how men and women are perceived differently. It is an interesting learning aid, because people may only believe that women and men were just treated differently in society, and perhaps didn't know that the divide between male and female was also seen in pieces of art work and in writings. It's also a great representation of what gender was like in Ancient times and how it's changed as the years and centuries progressed. It's amazing to see how, women especially, have went from not having any attention brought to them, to turning into very powerful figures in society. 

#AHMC2019 

Nicole Scopa
18
 

The Character of Man

Understanding the nature of our own species has been one of the greatest mysteries addressed in the history of human art, philosophy, literature, and culture. This collection will present a history of man’s search for the meaning of his own character—what impulses drive man, what morals and desires construct his life, and what artwork is produced as a result of this character. Does culture impact the character of man? Does it influence the men of one culture towards a particular mindset that distinguishes it from other men, or are there foundations of character that run throughout all of mankind? By examining the way that authors, artists, and philosophers approach the study of their fellow men, we can understand not only the cultural influences that drive these questions but also the nature of the men doing the questioning.



#AHMC2019

Briana Hanratty
19
 

Mark Twain Collection

Calvin Chen
11
1-24 of 556 Collections