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Found 729 Collections

 

Re-Imagining Migration DC Seminar Series, 2019-2020: Session 1

What does it take to prepare our youth for a world on the move with quality?

This collection is the first in a series of four created to support the Re-Imagining Migration DC Seminar Series, held between December 2019 to March 2020. The seminar series is led by Verónica Boix Mansilla, Senior Principal Investigator for Harvard Graduate School of Education's Project Zero, and Research Director for Re-Imagining Migration, with in-gallery experiences provided by educators from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the National Museum of American History, the National Portrait Gallery, the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, and the National Gallery of Art.

This set of collections is designed to be dynamic. We sill continue to add material, including participant-created content, throughout the seminar series so that the collections themselves can be used as a type of textbook, reflecting the content, development, and outputs of the full seminar series. Please check back to the hashtag #ReImaginingMigration to see what we anticipate will be a growing body of materials to support educators as they strive to serve and teach about human migration in relevant and deep ways.

#ReImaginingMigration

Philippa Rappoport
23
 

Art & Resistance 2: Black Women Subjects Free from the Gaze

This lesson was crafted as part of an instructional unit for a college level English class with high school supports (IB DP Language A: Literature). 

The impetus for continuing to center our literature study in resistance stems from Toni Morrison's professional ethos that her "sovereignty & authority as a racialized person...be struck immediately" in her writing while  "...not  speak[ing] for Black people;...[but]..speak[ing] to and be[ing] among [black people]".  Her determination "to make sure that the white gaze was not the dominant one in any of [her] books" is an example of the importance and power of authentic creation.

#goglobal #andersonpetty #mgg #wissit2019 #tonimorrison #blackwomen

Sher Anderson Petty
76
 

Curation...The Latest (and Equally Important!) C for Education

This collection is a curated collection of images that can be used with a lesson plan on curation. Each of the images has some possible connection to a social justice theme and the question asked by the creator of the collection is, "How might we approach conversations about curation and social justice?" Each of these images adds a unique and interesting dimension to a conversation about curation, the people whose stories are selected for view, and how those stories are empowered and/or disempowered by the stories that they are surrounded by. How do we make decisions about these topics? What do we do when we are asked to include in a curated collection pieces that change the story we might want to tell? How do we deal with the multi-faceted stories and sometimes contradictory stories of the people we select for our collections? 

It is important to ask these questions and have dialogues with students about how we come to our conclusions, make our decisions, and wrestle with these concepts. In a world of tweets and ever expanding stories/information it is important sometimes to talk about how we work with the realities of physical spaces where there isn't always enough wall real estate to highlight everyone all of the time. In those situations, how decisions are made, who is brought to the forefront (and who is not), and how our own beliefs/biases/views of the world play into those decisions all matter. 

How might you curate this collection in many ways? Who is still missing and why does it matter that we ask the questions at all? 

While this is intended to be a companion collection to a lesson on curation, the questions above may stand on their own. This collection is intended to be the beginning of a conversation, and not a stand alone collection; however, the lesson is also available in the collection as a downloadable PDF. 

#NPGTeach

Sean Wybrant
40
 

Narrative Writing

Create a nice narrative writing that is very fun...

Ansley Herndon
0
 

Science Fiction Literacy

The collection consists of science fiction writers, their awards and some science fiction writing tech ticks.
Mezeyd Alharshani
16
 

1930s Symbol

quietness = Isolation

David Adolph
8
 

Sparkle Sort

Nicki May
10
 

Time Machine

The collection about symbolism in the time period, I choose my symbolism to be fire. I choose fire because the way people fearing and using the fire changing overtime, we used fire as illumination 150 years ago, but right now we use the fire less in life.  The two main concentrate time period are 1895 and 2019.

Junlin He
9
 

Time Machine Project

Jacob Hoertdoerfer
12
 

Nicholas Gulla Time Machine Symbols of Defense

A collection of everyday items that could be used as a defense.

Nicholas Gulla
8
 

Asian American Modernism

This collection is meant to build on two earlier collections, "Asian American Art: Emerging from the Shadows"  and "Asian American Artists and World War II" and to introduce the viewer to artists of Asian ancestry in America using Chang, Johnson & Karlstrom's text, Asian American Art: A History, 1850-1970 (2008), the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco's exhibition catalog "Asian/American/Modern Art: Shifting Currents, 1900-1970" (2008),the vast resources of the Smithsonian Learning Lab, Project Zero's Global Thinking Routines and other resources.  This collection is part two of four that I have organized, chronologically, on Asian American Art.  The other three collections are "Asian American Art: Emerging from the Shadows",  "Asian American Artists and World War II" and "Asian American Contemporary Art".  It is my hope that these collections will serve as entry points to understanding the many contributions of Asian American artists in the U.S. from 1850 until the present time.

Visual art is a language that is socially and culturally constructed.  Socially constructed learning values diverse perspectives, engages with local and global experts, and employs inquiry, discovery and exploration to move students toward global citizenship.  Because the visual arts leverage the power of dialogue and debate to sharpen critical thinking, starting with the arts is a logical place to help students develop cultural intelligence.

Other purposes of these collections are to explore tangible and intangible cultural heritage; as well as jumpstart brave conversations about race, identity and immigration in the U.S. with teachers, tutors of English Language Learners and others who are interested in becoming cultural leaders in our public schools.

As Gordon H. Chang and Mark Dean Johnson state in the introduction of the exhibition catalog, "Asian/American/Modern Art: Shifting Currents, 1900-1970" (2008):

"Forty years ago there were no Asian Americans.  There were Chinese, Japanese, Koreans, Filipinos, and others of Asian ancestry in the United States, but no 'Asian Americans,' as that term was coined only in 1968.  This population was commonly seen as foreign, alien, not of America.  Their lives and experiences were not generally accepted as part of the fabric of the country, even though Asians had begun settling here steadily in the mid-nineteenth century.

Then, in the late 1960s, as part of the upsurge in the self-assertion of marginalized communities,  'Asian America' emerged to challenge the stigma of perpetual foreignness.  'Asian American' was a claim of belonging, of rootedness, of pride and identity, and of history and community; it was also a recognition of distinctive cultural achievement"  (Chang, Johnson, 2008).

#APA2018

Rubina Pantoja
18
 

Domingo Ulloa's

This teaching collection helps students to look closely and think critically by examining Domigo Ulloa's painting, Braceros, and historical documentation related to the bracero program, a series of short-term labor contracts from 1942-1964 in which an estimated two million Mexican men came to the US to work on farms and roads. The collection prompts students to consider the program from a variety of perspectives, including individual, collective, social, economic, and political.  

Included here are the painting, a bilingual video with Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM) curator E. Carmen Ramos, four suggested Thinking Routines - "See, Think, Wonder," "Step In, Step Out, Step Back," "The 3 Y's," and "Think, Feel, Care" - from Harvard's Project Zero Artful Thinking and Global Thinking materials, supporting digital content from the National Museum of American History, and a blogpost from SAAM of two DC student's written responses to the prompt, "What Domingo Ulloa's Braceros Means to Me." 

For use in Social Studies, Spanish, English, and American History classes

#LatinoHAC #EthnicStudies

This collection supports Unit 1: Intersectionality of Economics, Politics, and Policy, of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part B course.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center. 


Rubina Pantoja
10
 

The Time Machine Project

Project: Machines- Owen Gilgun

Owen Gilgun
8
 

Symbols

darkness

Rachael Lim
8
 

PBA Example Project: HG Wells's Time Machine and Shelley's Frankenstein

This is an example collection for a project on Time Travel.   For this collection, I'm using artifacts from Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, so that I do not inspire my students to borrow my content.  I want them to see this collection as an inspiration, not as a direct analogue. 

Eric Lister
9
 

Cultural Communications: Making the Melting Pot a Reality

DRAFT  Language is the very first tool that we use to understand the ideas that we are trying to share. But what about the monuments, art, and songs that we have created to share our ideas with one another? This exploration will focus on how American culture founded on the mixing of ethnicities and experiences used the skills and talents of its members to reveal its faults and celebrate its wonder and imagination. This collection will explore the sights and sounds of those who were here before all others, the 1st Nation Peoples, and travel from that past to the lives of their descendants and the all who followed by coming to the shores of this country. This exploration will give students a way to examine the history of those around them, but also their place within this most extravagant quilt of this country.

  • The purpose of this activity is to give students a better understanding of the American Indian identity of the United States as foundational to understanding this land. From that foundation they will journey through the musical/dance expressions of the people who came to inhabit the US and through them the historical/contemporary realities and perspectives that make up our society.


Please follow the lesson plan laid out at the beginning of the collection to see the best way to use it. #goglobal

Sean Felix
48
 

In the Eye of the Beholder: Looking at Women’s Portrayal in Portraiture During the Suffrage Movement

This collection uses portraits from the National Portrait Gallery's exhibition, Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence. These resources are intended to facilitate classroom discussion about how women were portrayed through art during the suffragist movement. Participants are encouraged to think about who creates portraits, what motivations may exist in their creation, how the portraits were used within the movement, and their potential impact, intended or not, on the suffragists' cause. 

Christy Ting
11
 

Native American Unit

SAAM

Cristi Marchetti
5
 

Exploring Social Justice with “One Life: Marian Anderson” and “In Mid-Sentence.”

This learning lab is rooted in exploring the concept of social justice and activism through biography and curation. This learning lab explores the power of one's narrative being shown through multiple artifacts in order to paint a bigger and more accurate picture of their role in social justice and activism. 

#NPG

Asia Stanislaus
36
 

Protest Then and Now

This collection includes images of different types of protests from the women's suffrage movement to contemporary issues. #ethnicstudies

Melanie Kirchhof
4
 

The Intersection of Race and Disability

#ethnicstudies

Amy Prescott
32
 

Ethnic Studies

Primary source set asks students to examine whose voice is valued in U.S.A. 

#ethnicstudies

Jennifer Smith
5
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