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Found 815 Collections

 

Subject: Eateries

#nmahphc

This is a sampling of photographs related to dining out from the Photographic History Collection.

For additional images, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: restaurant, cafe, bar, dining room, diner, waiter, waitress, serving staff, hostess, ice cream shop, burger joint, pizza joint, pizzeria, food court, cafeteria, food hall, drive-through, fast food, coffee shop, saloon, canteen, chop house, grill, lunch room, watering hole, inn, dive, drive in, donut house, greasy spoon, hamburger stand, luncheonette, night club, soda fountain, deli, bistro, automat, tea house

NMAH Photographic History Collection
36
 

"Explore with Smithsonian Experts" Film Series

This video series, Explore with Smithsonian Experts, connects students and teachers with the skill and technique of Smithsonian experts who describe their work at our nation's museums. In each short film, experts introduce new ways to observe, record, research and share, while using real artifacts and work experiences.

Keywords: entomology, arthropod, insects, beetles, ants, scientific method, verification, President Abraham Lincoln, March on Washington, The Wright Brothers, Orville and Wilbur Wright, flight, astrophotography, cosmos, astronomy, abstract art, El Anatsui, portraits, portraiture, President George Washington, Gertrude Stein, Gordon, Pocahontas, LL Cool J, Kehinde Wiley, Nicholasa Mohr, Dolores Huerta, Puerto Rico, Luis Muñoz Marín, Rudolfo Anaya, urban photography, Shifting States: Iraq, Luis Cruz Azaceta, choreography, dance, Japanese American incarceration (internment) camps, World War II, Queen Kapi'olani, Hawaii, diplomacy, Ecuadorian boat seat, Anansi spider, Ángel Suárez Rosado, baseball, Latino community, archiving, community, Anacostia

#EthnicStudies

Ashley Naranjo
44
 

Subject: Domestic Kitchens

#nmahphc

This is an assortment of photographs featuring domestic kitchens from the Photographic History Collection. The photographs appear in many different formats and process, and were created by professional and amateur photographers for a variety of purposes, such as commercial, advertising, documentary, social commentary, snapshot, and humor. 

For this collection, "kitchen" was considered as a space within the home, a place in which food was cooked for non-military and non-commercial purposes, and things found in kitchens. 

Additional Photographic History Collection Learning Lab collections related to food include, Food, Eateries, Agriculture, and Meals and Eating.

For additional images, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: kitchen, kitchen table, stove, sink, dishes, meal, cooking, meal preparation, baking, pot, pat, knife, spoon, fork, bowl.

NMAH Photographic History Collection
39
 

Subject: Agriculture

#nmahphc

This is an assortment of photographs from the Photographic History Collection broadly related to agriculture. The photographs seen here were created with a variety of formats and process, and for a variety of purposes by amateur and professional photographers.

For additional related photographs, see Learning Lab collections Eateries, Kitchens, Food, and Meals and Eating.

For additional images, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: barns, farms, crops, fields, plows, tractors, farmers, agriculture workers, horses, wagons, animal husbandry, cows, pigs, chickens, field hands, fences, hay, hay bale, hay stack, rakes, hoes, gardens, windmill, water trough, digging, orchard, ranch

NMAH Photographic History Collection
106
 

Ekphrastic Poetry

Students will learn how to write a poem inspired by artwork.

Shantelle Jones-Williams
10
 

ENG 201.2

This collection is for the use of teaching "Fences" by August Wilson from the perspective of Blues music.

Lindsay Gill
14
 

ENG 201.1

This collection is for the use of teaching "Fences" by August Wilson from the perspective of Blues Music.

Lindsay Gill
14
 

Domingo Ulloa's "Bracero": and "Bittersweet Harvest": Using Art and Historical Documentation to Deepen Understanding

This teaching collection helps students to look closely and think critically by examining Domigo Ulloa's painting, Braceros, and historical documentation related to the bracero program, a series of short-term labor contracts from 1942-1964 in which an estimated two million Mexican men came to the US to work on farms and roads. The collection prompts students to consider the program from a variety of perspectives, including individual, collective, social, economic, and political.  

Included here are the painting, a bilingual video with Smithsonian American Art Museum (SAAM) curator E. Carmen Ramos, four suggested Thinking Routines - "See, Think, Wonder," "Step In, Step Out, Step Back," "The 3 Y's," and "Think, Feel, Care" - from Harvard's Project Zero Artful Thinking and Global Thinking materials, supporting digital content from the National Museum of American History, and a blogpost from SAAM of two DC student's written responses to the prompt, "What Domingo Ulloa's Braceros Means to Me." 

For use in Social Studies, Spanish, English, and American History classes

#LatinoHAC #EthnicStudies

This collection supports Unit 1: Intersectionality of Economics, Politics, and Policy, of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part B course.

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center. 


Philippa Rappoport
10
 

Subject: Civil War Photography: Seville Collection

#nmahphc

This collection of cartes-de-visite portraits of Union soldiers is the Seville collection in the National Museum of American History’s Photographic History Collection. The collection was donated in 1931 by Smithsonian employee Marian Wells Seville, a Smithsonian library cataloger and assistant. Seville's father, Captain William P. Seville, served with the 1st Delaware Volunteers during the Civil War. Throughout the war, he obtained these photographs of the men with whom he served. Seville authored, The History of the First Regiment, Delaware Volunteers: From the Commencement of the “Three Month’s Service” to the Final Muster Out at the Close of the Rebellion, in 1884. 

The biographies of nearly all the subjects in this collection are attached to the record. Follow the links to "more info" after clicking on each image.

For more images, search collections.si.edu

Keywords: Civil War soldier, men in uniform, carte-de-visite, studio portraiture, mustache, military weapons, surgeon, surgeon-general., general, quartermaster, captain, heroics, Smithsonian history, women collectors, women donors, women librarians, use of photography

NMAH Photographic History Collection
29
 

If You Build the Collection, They Will Come

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring baseball. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about baseball, watch a video about the Jackie Robinson, and learn about women's baseball. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
51
 

Printing at Home

Producing printed products is a hobby that many Americans enjoy today, but technology has not always allowed the ease and affordability to enjoy this pastime. Before one-click internet publishing, before pocket-sized printers, and before word processors, there was the tabletop printing press.

In the 1860s the invention, manufacture, and distribution of tabletop printing presses expanded the hobby of self-publishing. Printing technology was once rarely found outside of printing shops and publishing houses, but the tabletop printing press allowed for publishing at home—or in any location. 

(This Learning Lab collection is a virtual reinterpretation of a physical exhibit in the National Museum of American History. Exhibit labels can be found by clicking the paper clip icon next to each artifact.)

Joan Boudreau
25
 

Perfume: The Story of a Murderer - Writing & Discussion Activities

This collection is used to launch the novel "Perfume: The Story of a Murderer." This is a novel which nearly defies categorization. Suskind, the writer ventures into a creative territory few students read in high school. Instead of beginning the unit with general background and context about the novel, we begin from an emotional point - - what emotions and experiences are prompted by the setting, mood, atmosphere, etc.? Below are the general steps we follow:                           #SAAMteach

1. Pairs of students are each given two different paintings (I have a very small class - 12 students - - and choose to give each group two in order to cover more; however, you could easily do this with a class of 24 and each group of two has one painting.)

2. Each group has a graphic organizer which is a modified "See/Think/Wonder" format, coupled with a brainstorming opportunity regarding the emotions generated by this painting. They're given approximately 10 minutes to work their way through the paintings and complete the lists for each, as they discuss, etc. I print out the pictures for them because I don't want them to see the titles and any additional information they may find online.

3. When they have about 10 minutes, the students each have an opportunity to walk their classmates through the paintings and then open up the floor for a discussion about the emotions conveyed through this work.

4. We keep a running list of these emotions on the board. Some that have surfaced include: confusion, disgust, loneliness, repugnance, helplessness, panic, anger, fear... Next to this list we wrote some overall concepts, such as abstract mixed with realism, abandonment, intimidation, and disconnect...

5. When completed, I'll lead the conversation to a discussion about how these very same emotions are reflected by and presented within the novel...but like the paintings, in very unique ways. I choose my words carefully so as not to give the entire first few chapters away, but at the same time, offering them a preview. We then read the first two paragraphs out loud, and discuss how so many of the elements noted on the board are present already.

6. They're then assigned Chapters 1, 2, and 3 to read, with a "list" of suggested items to watch for, annotate, etc. as they complete their first close reading of the novel. (This assignment is attached.)

7. Part II involves writing in response to one of the paintings, completed after students have read the novel. (See Google Doc directions)

Annette Spahr
15
 

Cultural Communications: Telling Our Stories

Language is the very first tool that we use to understand the ideas that we are trying to share. But what about the monuments, art, and songs that we have created to share our ideas with one another? This exploration will focus on how American culture founded on the mixing of ethnicities and experiences used the skills and talents of its members to reveal its faults and celebrate its wonder and imagination. This collection focuses on the identities and expressions of 1st Nations People, African American, and White American cultures. There are so many other cultures that have contributed to this nations story, this is just one exploration of many that we should embark on to tell our stories of who we are as a people and a nation. This exploration will give students a way to examine the history of those around them, but also their place within this most extravagant quilt of this country. 

  • The purpose of this activity is to give students a better understanding of the American Indian identity of the United States as foundational to understanding this land. From that foundation they will journey through the musical/dance expressions of those who came to be known as White Americans and African Americans, who came to inhabit the US and through them some of the historical/contemporary realities and perspectives that make up a part of our society.

Please follow the lesson plan laid out at the beginning of the collection to see the best way to use it. #goglobal

Sean Felix
73
 

Elementary Economics

This playlist on economics is designed for self-guided learning with intermittent check-ins for elementary age students. The learning tasks are divided over five days, designed for 30-35 minutes per day, and build on each other. However, students are able to work on this playlist at their own pace. They will engage with primary and secondary sources as well as visual, video, and written texts. Students have the option to complete the tasks online by connecting through Google classroom or access Google doc versions of each formative and summative assessments for work online and/or offline. By the end of the week, students will create a marketplace that demonstrates understanding of basic economic principles.

  • Formative assessments are represented by a chevron (Learning Check In and Tasks).
  • Summative assessments are represented by a circle (Final Task).
  • Google doc versions of all formative and summative assessments are in the tiles immediately after the digital versions. 

*Social Studies and Visual Arts standards vary by state for elementary grades. We recommend educators and caregivers consult their student and child's state standards for these two subjects.

National Museum of American History
76
 

#ColorOurCollections at the National Portrait Gallery

This Learning Lab collection has been created to encourage learners of all ages to #ColorOurCollections and engage with our portraits! Each coloring page is followed by the portrait in our collection that the coloring page is based on. We invite you to compare and contrast your creation with our collections! What might you add to your portrait? What colors would you use? What choices did you make that were the same as  the choices the original artist made? What choices did you make that were different?

#NPGteach #myNPG

Caitlin Blake
23
 

Picturing Community

How do we define community today? Through social media our connections with family, friends and acquaintances are increasingly widespread. And yet we are still drawn to the idea of small communities and the face-to-face interactions they promote. The artists represented in this learning lab module explore this concept through a series of related portraits of families, friends, neighbors, and various identity groups.

After completing this learning lab module, students will be better able to:

  • Identify and analyze key components of a portrait
  • Explore the definition of “community” and its relevance in their own lives.

#NPGteach

Nicole Vance
55
 

Caretakers: Zoom In Activity

Zoom in on a small part of an artwork, tell stories, then zoom out! A discussion-based looking activity.

Elizabeth Dale-Deines
26
 

Photographer: Fassbender, Adolf

#nmahphc

This is a selection of photogravures by Adolf Fassbender.

For additional images, search collection.si.edu.

Keywords: photomechanical, art photography, Pictorialism

NMAH Photographic History Collection
35
 

Caretakers: Compare and Contrast Activity

Step 1:  Compare two artworks... what's similar and different? Step 2: Look closely to uncover the big idea of one artwork. How does your thinking change when you see two artworks, side-by-side?

Elizabeth Dale-Deines
26
 

With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring superheroes. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch videos about creating Marvel Comics as well as a video about a really amazing comic book store owner. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
58
 

Exploring Art with Quilts at the Anacostia Community Museum

This collection of quilts offers material to challenge conventional definitions of art and artists, explore the many different ways to tell a visual story and spark discussions about the traditions that are passed down in families. This resource is structured around 2 hour-long lessons in art analysis, a creative task and a reflection session.

A range of styles and traditions are represented here, as each quilt and quilter has their own story to tell. The story can be evident in the visual content of the quilt, but the context in which it was created can be equally important. Quilting is an art form taught between generations and amongst friends, bridging the gap between material culture and intangible heritage.

By encouraging young learners to look closely and develop evidence-based arguments, we can hope to build their skills to think deeply about the interrelationship of art, memory and community.

Enclosed in the Teacher's Resource is a list of quilts, short biographies of the artists and potential discussion questions. Also included are suggested art and craft activities, and an annotated bibliography for educators who want to do more research on the topic.

Goals:

  • How can we express things that are important to us?
  • How can quilts teach us about community?

Objectives:

  • Challenge and expand definitions of “art” and “artist.”
  • Develop a toolkit for visual analysis.
  • Understand different forms of creative self-expression.
  • Learn about traditions we share in our communities and pass between generations.
  • Empower students’ creativity.
Celine Romano
14
 

What makes a place? Memorials in the U.S.

This playlist on "What makes a place? Memorials in the U.S." is designed for self-guided learning with intermittent check-ins for  students. The learning tasks are divided over five days, designed for 30-35 minutes per day, and build on each other. However, students are able to work on this playlist at their own pace. They will engage with visual, video, and written texts. Students have the option to complete the tasks online by connecting through Google classroom or print word doc versions of each formative and summative assessments for work offline. By the end of the week, students will create a work of art. 

  • Formative assessments are represented by a chevron (Learning Task and Learning Check In).
  • Summative assessments are represented by a circle (Final Task).
  • Word doc versions of all formative and summative assessments are in the tiles immediately after the digital versions. 


Stephanie Hammer
39
 

Subject: Hotels and Motels

#nmahphc

This is a sampling of photographs from the Photographic History Collection related to hotels and motels, and other established places one might stay while away from home. 

These images are snapshots, real photo postcards,albumen and Kromscope stereoviews, fine art and documentary photographs, scans from glass plate negatives.

For additional images, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: hotels, motels, inns, spas, resorts, road trip, vacation, haciendas, roadside lodging

NMAH Photographic History Collection
44
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