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Found 890 Collections

 

"Hyphenated Americans": When “Bricklayer Bill” Won the 1917 Boston Marathon, It Was a Victory For All Irish Americans

This collection explores the notion of hyphenated Americans, through the story of one man, William Kennedy, an American of Irish descent, born in New York in the late 19th century, who went on to win the Boston Marathon in 1918. Bill's nephew, in writing about his uncle, said, "When “Bricklayer Bill” Won the 1917 Boston Marathon, It Was a Victory For All Irish Americans." What did he mean?

To aid discussion, included in this collection are images, a cartoon, several articles, a story fro WBUR, and one thinking routine from Harvard's Project Zero Global Thinking - "Step In, Step Out, Step Back" - to "encourage learners to take other people’s perspectives, recognize that understanding others is an ongoing process, and understand that our efforts to take perspective can reveal as much about ourselves as they can about the people we are seeking to understand."

This collection complements chapter 6 ("The Flight From Ireland") of Ronald Takaki's A Different Mirror for Young People: A History of Multicultural America, and supports Unit 2: What is the history?, and Unit 3: Local History and Current Issues, of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part B course. 

#EthnicStudies


Philippa Rappoport
9
 

Crossing the Delaware Collection by Ashley Naranjo

This collection highlights variations on a theme through works of art: George Washington Crossing the Delaware, George Washington Carver Crossing the Delaware and Shimomura Crossing the Delaware. Comparisons of these works could serve as springboards for discussions about identity, immigration, "master" or dominant narratives in history, and hero myths.

“History matters because it has contemporary consequence,” declared historian Jennifer Guiliano, explaining to an audience how stereotypes affect children of all races. “In fact, what psychological studies have found, is when you take a small child out to a game and let them look at racist images for two hours at a time they then begin to have racist thoughts.”

The assistant professor affiliated with American Indian Programs at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis went on to explain what that means to parents who have taken their kid for a family-oriented excursion to a sporting event with a racist mascot.

“We’re taking children who are very young, exposing them to racist symbology and then saying ‘But don’t be a racist when you grow up,’” Guiliano says. “This is the irony of sort of how we train and educate children. When we think about these issues of bringing children up, of thinking about the impact of these things, this is why history matters.”

Guiliano was among the speakers at a day-long symposium, “Mascots, Myths, Monuments and Memory,” examining racist mascots, the fate of Confederate statues and the politics of memory. The program was held in Washington, D.C. at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture in partnership with the National Museum of the American Indian.

Lonnie Bunch, the founding director of the African American History museum, says this all came about after a conversation with his counterpart Kevin Gover at the American Indian museum. Bunch says he learned that the creation of Confederate monuments and the rise of racist Indian mascots in sporting events occurred during the same period in American history, between the 1890s and 1915. This gathering was one way to help people understand the how and why between that overlap.



#EthnicStudies

Sher Anderson Petty
10
 

Math: Unstacked

UNSTACKED is a wonderful way to spark inquiry, analysis, and discussion. By visually exploring our images, you can bring the Smithsonian Libraries' collections into your classroom. Use UNSTACKED as a morning exercise, a way to introduce a new topic, or to discover your students' interests. Picture your world, dive into the stacks! 

The research and creation of this project was funded by the Gates Foundation Youth Access Grant.

Smithsonian Libraries
12
 

Art To Go/ Arte en tu casa (Middle School)

Artworks and Activities for Middle School Students Learning at Home. We hope that these artworks can give you a way to get creative, connect with something in the wider world, or just keep your beautiful brain busy. Use the activities in any order. All activities work with all artworks - there’s no wrong way to use this packet.

Obras de arte y actividades para estudiantes de la escuela intermedia que aprenden en casa. Esperamos que estas obras de arte te ayuden a aumentar tu creatividad, a relacionarte con el resto del mundo o, sencillamente, a ocupar tu maravilloso cerebro. No importa el orden en que hagas las actividades. Todas pueden hacerse con cualquiera de las obras de arte: no hay manera de equivocarse cuando usas este conjunto de actividades. 

Elizabeth Dale-Deines
8
 

Subject: Television

#nmahphc

This is an assortment of photographs from the Photographic History Collection related to television. This collection has three groups of photographs. 

  1. Photographs of television content. These are photographs of images on television screens.
  2. Photographs of televisionsThese are photographs of televisions and people watching television.
  3. Photographs of television production. These are photographs depicting the making of television content and in television studios.

For additional images, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords:  TV, television, tv shows, watching tv, television furniture, making tv, television repair, television and news events, breaking news, television camera, television personalities, late night television, comedy, sport TV, sports television, ABC, NBC, CBS, cable television, Christmas trees, living room

Keywords (people): Richard Nixon, Johnny Carson, Joe Garagiola, George Wallace, Elliott Erwitt, J. Ross Baughman, Ken Regan, Roone Arledge, AV Weston, President William Clinton

Keywords (photography): snapshot, press print, documentary photography, fine art photography, photojournalism



NMAH Photographic History Collection
34
 

#ColorOurCollections at the National Portrait Gallery

This Learning Lab collection has been created to encourage learners of all ages to #ColorOurCollections and engage with our portraits! Each coloring page is followed by the portrait in our collection that the coloring page is based on. We invite you to compare and contrast your creation with our collections! What might you add to your portrait? What colors would you use? What choices did you make that were the same as  the choices the original artist made? What choices did you make that were different?

#NPGteach #myNPG

Caitlin Blake
63
 

ABC Easy As 123

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring the alphabet. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they wonder, and compare how they are alike and different. Families can check out alphabets and consider how each of the letters are designed. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
40
 

Subject: Books and Reading

#nmahphc

This is an assortment of photographs from the Photographic History Collection of people reading, books, and libraries. 

For additional images, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: read, reading, books, letters, magazines, journals, newspapers, library, libraries, bookshop, book store, librarian

NMAH Photographic History Collection
77
 

Tuia te here tangata waka | Binding the ties of humanity canoe

This collection is built around a waka Māori currently on display in the National Museum of Natural History.
waka is a traditional canoe. It is designed as a portal to Te Ao Māori - The indigenous worldview  Māori are the native people of New Zealand. Its traditional name is Aotearoa meaning Land of the long white cloud.

This waka was made from a single 100-year old Tōtara tree. Tōtara is a large native New Zealand hardwood that grows throughout the North and South Island. It is light weighted and high natural oil content which prevents rotting or deterioration. Waka are extensions of Māori tribal history and are the traditional technology responsible for mobilising navigators across the Pacific Ocean. The infamous explorer Kupe, discovered New Zealand in 925 AD.

The name of the waka is Tuia te here tangata meaning Binding the ties of humanity. It celebrates the connection established in 1840 between the US Exploring expedition and Māori. The name and physical artefact hope to inspire understanding. The collection aims to digitally illustrate the mauri or life force of the waka. We can transform our wounds into wisdom by seeking first to understand, and then to be understood.

Anahera Hare
48
 

CoPilotWhoDidItFirst

This collection was created to support an online class for elementary teachers focusing on STEM individuals as we study "Who Did It First?.

Erin Grossi
8
 

Art & Resistance 4: Unmasked (draft)

If protests make public what is generally kept private, then someone needs to tell America that their racism is showing.   Since March, several states have taken widespread quarantine safety measures (social distancing, shelter in place, & temporary business closures) to combat the spread of the coronavirus pandemic. Some, like protesters in front of the Humboldt County Courthouse in Eureka, CA, object to the CDC safety measures viewing them as infringements on their freedom & civil liberties.  Quarantine protests, like this one on May 15th, reveal America's underpinnings may be sadly soiled beyond repair and destined for removing, refreshing and repurposing.  

In the spirit of reusing and recycling in order to reduce waste, it may be necessary to acknowledge some problematic protest signage.  Some signs' rhetoric equated the mandatory wearing of personal protective equipment (PPE) to the mandatory compulsory wearing of torture masks (used on Africans trafficked into slavery) and the sometimes mandatory wearing of muzzles (used for dogs in obedience training).  The protesters' signs explicitly reveal a lack of historical knowledge and imply a false equivalence that negates the humanity of trafficked individuals and the basic dignity of all beings.

Art & Resistance 4- Unmasked is a collection inspired by this protest imagery/ rhetoric and extended as a means of: (1) calling out racist rhetoric to interrupt problematic behavior while (2) calling in an opportunity to explore history & intention more deeply, make meaning collectively, and find a mutual sense of understanding across difference.


  

Sher Anderson Petty
23
 

Distance Learning: Teaching Persepolis

The purpose of this collection is to model for educators distance learning instruction:

  1. using museum artifacts & visual texts to learn/ teach
    • historical/ cultural context for novel study
  2. using Project Zero thinking routines to interrogate text
Sher Anderson Petty
32
 

"Explore with Smithsonian Experts" Film Series

This video series, Explore with Smithsonian Experts, connects students and teachers with the skill and technique of Smithsonian experts who describe their work at our nation's museums. In each short film, experts introduce new ways to observe, record, research and share, while using real artifacts and work experiences.

Keywords: entomology, arthropod, insects, beetles, ants, scientific method, verification, President Abraham Lincoln, March on Washington, The Wright Brothers, Orville and Wilbur Wright, flight, astrophotography, cosmos, astronomy, abstract art, El Anatsui, portraits, portraiture, President George Washington, Gertrude Stein, Gordon, Pocahontas, LL Cool J, Kehinde Wiley, Nicholasa Mohr, Dolores Huerta, Puerto Rico, Luis Muñoz Marín, Rudolfo Anaya, urban photography, Shifting States: Iraq, Luis Cruz Azaceta, choreography, dance, Japanese American incarceration (internment) camps, World War II, Queen Kapi'olani, Hawaii, diplomacy, Ecuadorian boat seat, Anansi spider, Ángel Suárez Rosado, baseball, Latino community, archiving, community, Anacostia

#EthnicStudies

Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access
44
 

Alvin Ailey

Explore primary sources of Alvin Ailey.

Marcie Atkins
5
 

Coming of Age / Bildungsroman

A collection of images from the Smithsonian American Art Museum that explore the journey from youth to adulthood.


Elizabeth Dale-Deines
26
 

Art To Go/ Arte en su casa (Elementary)

Artworks and Activities for Elementary Students Learning at Home. This packet includes a booklet of creative writing activities and printed artworks that feature heroic figures and folktales.

Obras de arte y actividades para estudiantes de la escuela primaria que aprenden en casa. Este conjunto de actividades incluye un folleto con ejercicios de redacción creativa y obras de arte impresas que presentan a personajes heroicos y cuentos populares.

Elizabeth Dale-Deines
8
 

Please Do Touch the Paintings: Hands-on Art Projects from NMAAHC (Portraiture)

This Learning Lab from the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) will explore the art of portraiture through Amy Sherald's piece Grand Dame Queenie (2012). 

Portraiture provides an avenue for self-expression and identity building unlike any other genre of visual art. Studying portraiture can be a great introduction to self-reflection and biography for young minds. 

Visitors to this Learning Lab collection will have the opportunity  to learn more about Amy Sherald and her approach to portraiture while trying their hand at their own portrait! The questions, prompts, and information provided in this Learning Lab will help students develop their ability to follow instructions and hone their skills in drawing, design thinking, writing competency, and creative expression. 

The guiding questions of this Learning Lab are

  • What is portraiture?
  • How can artists express themselves through portraiture?
  • What can we learn about portraiture as an art though drawing our own portraits?
  • How do artists talk about their work? 
  • How can we use art to tell stories or relay information?

If you are new to Learning Lab, visit https://learninglab.si.edu/help/getting-started to learn how to get started!

National Museum of African American History and Culture
10
 

James Smithson: What's in a Name?

Do you know how the Smithsonian got its name?  If you answered "no" you are not alone.  A lot of people know about the Smithsonian Institution, but they don't know about the man who gave his name and bequest to create what has become the largest museum complex and research center in the world.

Curious?  Well, here's the story...

Laura Shafer
11
 

Art + Social Emotional Learning (SEL)

An online teacher workshop exploring art and mindful integration of social-emotional skills.

Tuesday, May, 19, 2020

Elizabeth Dale-Deines
13
 

Art & Resistance 3: The Poetry of Joy Harjo (Part B)

The purpose of this Joy Harjo inspired collection is to model for educators distance learning instruction:

  1. using museum artifacts & visual texts to learn/ teach
    • historical/ cultural context for poetry study 
      • as a followup to Art & Resistance 3:  Kent Monkman & Indian Residential Schools (Part A)
  2. using Project Zero thinking routines to interrogate text

"(At Home) On Art and Resiliece: Artist Talk with Kent Monkman" presented by the Hirshhorn Museum inspired me to create a collection that, like his art, speaks to the complicated relationship between between indigenous people and settlers in America. I resonated with Monkman's artistic ethos about the heretofore missing narratives of indigenous people and the limited colonial perspective from which their history is most often told. 

Prior to hearing Monkman speak, I had begun crafting a Smithsonian Learning Lab series of collections centering creators from marginalized groups in America breaking out from preconceptions of their "place" in America's racialized hierarchy.  Art and Resistance 1 is a collection that centers Frederick Douglass as a master of 19th century's version of social media. He wielded his likeness as a weapon against the ubiquity of the anti-black/ racist imagery of his time.  Art and Resistance 2 is an homage to professor, editor, and Nobel & Pulitzer Prize winning novelist Toni Morrison. The collection centers her literary ethos to be among and to write about the African American experience, outside of the white gaze. 

During the Hirshhorn Zoom event, when Monkman spoke of the resiliency of indigenous people, I knew they would be the subject of my next collection.  In view of my students' limited experience interrogating the complexities of Indian History, Monkman's paintings The Scream and The Scoop provided a visceral entrypoint for my students to get engaged in studying the shameful policy of Residential Indian Boarding Schools as historical and cultural context for a subsequent literary study of the poetry of America's Poet Laureate Joy Harjo.


Sher Anderson Petty
20
 

Like a Fish to Water

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring swimming. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a video about water safety as well as a videos about animals swimming. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
36
 

Pearly Whites

I created this collection for families to do together while schools are closed. I will be making a collection a day while we are out of school. Today we will be exploring teeth. The idea is for families to look at the items in the collection and consider what they see in the objects and paintings, what they think, and what they wonder. Families can also watch a free Brainpop video about teeth as well as explore videos about animal teeth. Families can listen to read alouds and podcasts about teeth. At the end of the collection I have provided a few ideas for families about what to do next.

If you want to learn more about more about See Think Wonder you can click here to see a video of a teacher using the routine in her classroom.

Ellen Rogers
25
 

Photographer: Gilbertson, Ashley

#nmahphc

This is a portfolio collection from the Photographic History Collection of work by Ashley Gilbertson from his series Bedrooms of the Fallen. A specially designed wooden portfolio was created to hold these works. Gilbertson is a member of VII Photo Agency.

Copyright Ashley Gilbertson

For additional collections, search collections.si.edu.

Keywords: veterans, grief, death, memorial, memory, parents, young people, suicide, bedroom, domestic interior, bedroom decorations, masculine culture, masculinity, American flag, military personnel, Afghanistan veteran, Iraq veteran, photojournalist, photojournalism, documentary photography

NMAH Photographic History Collection
16
 

IB Literature Resistance Unit Resources

"[Resistance is the power and capacity to exert force in opposition;  iis the refusal to accept or comply with something; it is the attempt to prevent something by action or argument.]  When we talk about resistance to slavery, at first glance one might think this is a narrow topic, since slavery itself is such a broad subject. It turns out, however, that resistance actually impacted (and continues to impact) every aspect of slavery and its legacy. There is resistance during the entire time, from 1619 or so, when the first African-Americans are brought into Virginia, until slavery is officially legally ended in 1865 (with continued resistance with regard to slavery’s unfortunate legacy of Jim Crow laws, Black Codes and other forms of institutionalized racism, intrinsic bias, as well as micro and macro aggressions).  Though we must learn about the horrors and oppression of slavery, we must also learn about the resilience of enslaved and formerly enslaved people. Any study of slavery that does not include the consistent and concentrated efforts of the enslaved to resist is woefully inaccurate. The enslaved resisted. The formerly enslaved resisted. Today, the descendants of the enslaved involuntary immigrants continue to resist the oppression that is the legacy of slavery." 

Greenberg, Kenneth, Distinguished Professor of History/ narrator. "Resistance Means more Than Rebellion." iTunes app, 1, March 2018.

Sher Anderson Petty
12
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