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Found 497 Collections

 

Marvels of Greece and Rome

The Greeks were famous for their skill at building,not only temples and palaces, but theatres and arenas too. They were also marvellous sculptors. The Romans copied Greek buildings and made improvements. The Romans imitated the Greeks in making lifelike figures in bronze,marble,gold and ivory. My collection contains buildings and sculptures from the Greek and Roman world and the stories behind them.


Simona-Elena Humelnicu-Christofi
6
 

Making: Design a Protest Poster

Inspired by a workshop activity hosted by 2018 National Design Award winner for Communication Design Civilization, download the included worksheet and follow along to create your own visually-impactful protest poster. 

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
13
 

Making: Katagami-Inspired Stencils

In this collection, you'll find the process to creating and using your own nature-inspired stencil, inspired by Cooper Hewitt's Katagami exhibition on view from March 30, 2019 to October 27, 2019. Grab materials and follow along, or find inspiration for later! 

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
18
 

AFRICAN COSMOS

Put the ARTS in STEM - From Egypt to South Africa, take a brief tour of the African Cosmos  and have your students discover the intersection of Art and Astronomy in the southern hemisphere.   Explore constellations only seen on the African continent.  See why the Goliath beetle became a symbol of rebirth for the Egyptian scarab.  Learn about celestial navigation by people and animals. 

Create Your Own Constellation!  Request Activity sheets for your classroom.

Submit your class constellations to our Student Gallery and be a part of your own school's online exhibition!


Jessica Radovich
73
 

ACCESS SERIES | Galaxy Quest

IMPORTANT: Click on the "i" for information icon and the paperclip icons as you move through the collection.

Have you ever wondered what's going on out there in the universe? Would you like to discover exciting things about planets, stars, and galaxies? Today, we will go on a GALAXY QUEST to EXPLORE THE UNIVERSE!

RATIONALE | Digital technology has transformed how we explore the Universe. We now have the ability to peer into space right from our homes and laptop computers. Telescopes, photography, and spectroscopy remain the basic tools that scientists—astronomers and cosmologists—use to explore the universe, but digital light detectors and powerful computer processors have enhanced these tools. Observatories in space—like the Hubble Space Telescope—have shown us further into space then we have ever seen before.

EDUCATORS | For the LESSON PLAN of the original "Galaxy Quest" << CLICK HERE >>

Lesson Objectives:
1. Process and save at least one digital image of a galaxy or space image (with caption)
2. Create a three-dimensional astronomy sculpture (galaxy or other space body, space alien, plant, animal)
3. Create a digital astronomy sculpture (galaxy or other space body, space alien, plant, animal)
4. Visit the Explore the Universe exhibition at NASM and identify Hubble parts (mirror, lens, spectroscope)

Learning Objectives:
1.     What a galaxy is
2.     What a space telescope is
3.     Learn how to open an image on the computer and process it
4.     Socialize well in the museum setting


Tags: decision-making, self-determination, access, disability, accessibility, neurodiversity, special education, SPED, out of school learning, informal learning, cognitive, social skills, engagement, passion, creativity, empowerment, All Access Digital Arts Program 


Jessica Radovich
77
 

Beyond Monarchs: Animal Migration

This collection starts with monarch butterflies and their migration. My hope was to remind the second graders about what they have already learned about monarchs. 

Once the students' background knowledge is activated then the students can participate in the Tuning In activity. Students will analyze the art piece using the Harvard's Project Zero Thinking Routine: See, Think, Wonder. 

Once the students have made their thinking visible then the class will find more out by learning about the art piece from the artist and learning about bird migrations. The students will engage in the Harvard Global Thinking Routine The 3 Ys.

To push the students beyond flying animals the Going Further section will expose the  students to migrations of animals on land, air, and see. The students will end this section using the Thinking Routine Think, Puzzle, Explore. Students can then have time to research about animals on their own.

Jennifer Woollven
19
 

Mexican Art & U.S. History: Carmen Lomas Garza

This collection will provide an opportunity for students to analyze artwork, read background information, and connect art with historical events. At the heart of this activity is artwork created by Latino artist Carmen Lomas Garza. These paintings reflect the experiences of Garza's family and Latino life in 1980s America. In addition to image analysis, teachers could extend an opportunity for students to identify and discuss connections between Garza's art and the Mexican American experience from the 1960s to the present. This collection includes:

  • A timeline of U.S.-Mexican American relations
  • Video/audio of Reagan signing the 1986 Immigration Reform Control Act
  • And an overview of immigration reform via ABC-CLIO (requires subscription). 

#ethnicstudies #LISDSS

24A describe how the characteristics of and issues in U.S. history have been reflected in various genres of art, music, film, and literature;

Amanda Blake
24
 

Visualizing Democracy

This Learning Lab complements the National Portrait Gallery's student program, Visualizing Democracy. 

Students will visualize democracy from the colonial era to the 21st century by analyzing portraits of major figures who played a critical role—as government officials, engaged citizens, or both—in creating a democratic society for the United States. Students will investigate how portraiture can convey democratic ideals and how, as a cultural institution housed in a historic building, the National Portrait Gallery has been and continues to be relevant to American democracy.

#NPGteach


Kita McCord
19
 

Prototyping: Making and Exploration

In this collection, explore prototyping. Here, you'll find examples of prototypes from the Cooper Hewitt collection and a prototyping activity to do at home or in the classroom.

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
25
 

guns and stuff used in the American revolution

a collection of guns

David Marchant
10
 

The Toaster: Best Thing Since Sliced Bread

This collection was made for a Kindergarten Class that was exploring a common object, a toaster. The class started by using a thinking routine from Agency by Design, a part of Harvard Graduate School of Education's Project Zero. The used the thinking routine Parts, Purposes, Complexities to thinking deeply about the toaster and generate questions about it. This collection provides additional toasters from different time periods to push the Kinder student inquiry further. The use of the thinking routine See, Think, Wonder also helps generate thinking about the objects.

Ellen Rogers
29
 

Uncovering America: Faces of America/Portraits

What is a portrait? What truths and questions does a portrait communicate?

What might a portrait express about the person portrayed? How does it reflect the sitter’s community, setting, family, or friends? What does the portrait reveal about the artist?

Discover compelling stories of creativity, struggle, and resilience in this new set of resources for K–12 educators featuring works of art that reflect the richness and diversity of the people, places, and cultures of the United States.

National Gallery of Art
4
 

Which One Doesn't Belong

This collection includes digital museum resources and models the listening and speaking strategy Which one Doesn't Belong.  The collection can be copied and adapted for use in your own classroom. 




#EthnicStudies


Jennifer Smith
8
 

Uncovering America: Manifest Destiny and the West

In what ways was the US settled and unsettled in the 19th century?

What role did artists play in shaping public understandings of the US West?

Discover compelling stories of creativity, struggle, and resilience in this new set of resources for K–12 educators featuring works of art that reflect the richness and diversity of the people, places, and cultures of the United States.

National Gallery of Art
4
 

Uncovering America: Gordon Parks Photography

How does Gordon Parks use photography to address inequities in the United States?

How do Gordon Parks’s images capture the intersections of art, race, class, and politics across the United States?

What do photographs in general—and Gordon Parks’s photographs more specifically—tell us about the American Dream?

Discover compelling stories of creativity, struggle, and resilience in this new set of resources for K–12 educators featuring works of art that reflect the richness and diversity of the people, places, and cultures of the United States.

National Gallery of Art
4
 

Uncovering America: Harlem Renaissance

How do visual artists of the Harlem Renaissance explore black identity and political empowerment?

How does visual art of the Harlem Renaissance relate to current-day events and issues?

How do migration and displacement influence cultural production?

Discover compelling stories of creativity, struggle, and resilience in this new set of resources for K–12 educators featuring works of art that reflect the richness and diversity of the people, places, and cultures of the United States.

National Gallery of Art
4
 

Uncovering America: Art and the Great Depression

Does art “work” or have a purpose? How?

Is making art a form of work? Make your argument for why or why not.

Franklin Delano Roosevelt stated that art in America has never been the sole province of a select group or class of people. Do you agree or disagree?

Define what you think Roosevelt meant by “the democratic spirit.” How do you think art can represent democratic values?

Discover compelling stories of creativity, struggle, and resilience in this new set of resources for K–12 educators featuring works of art that reflect the richness and diversity of the people, places, and cultures of the United States.

National Gallery of Art
4
 

Uncovering America: Expressing the Individual

How is identity shaped, formed, and expressed?

How can works of art help us understand our world and ourselves more fully?

Discover compelling stories of creativity, struggle, and resilience in this new set of resources for K–12 educators featuring works of art that reflect the richness and diversity of the people, places, and cultures of the United States.

National Gallery of Art
4
 

Uncovering America: People and the Environment

In what ways have Americans impacted the environment?

What is our collective responsibility toward the earth and each other?

How do artists engage with these questions through works of art?

Discover compelling stories of creativity, struggle, and resilience in this new set of resources for K–12 educators featuring works of art that reflect the richness and diversity of the people, places, and cultures of the United States.

National Gallery of Art
4
 

Uncovering America: Civil War and Its Aftermath

How do we remember the Civil War?

Whose stories are told in the art and memorials from and about the time period?

Discover compelling stories of creativity, struggle, and resilience in this new set of resources for K–12 educators featuring works of art that reflect the richness and diversity of the people, places, and cultures of the United States.

National Gallery of Art
4
 

Uncovering America: Immigration and Displacement

Why do people migrate to and within the United States?

How might works of art help us understand personal experiences of immigration and displacement?

Discover compelling stories of creativity, struggle, and resilience in this new set of resources for K–12 educators featuring works of art that reflect the richness and diversity of the people, places, and cultures of the United States. Encourage creative, critical, and historical thinking in your students as you examine works of art from the country’s creation to the present day.


National Gallery of Art
4
 

Uncovering America: Transportation

How does transportation affect our daily lives?

What can we learn about transportation and travel from works of art?

Discover compelling stories of creativity, struggle, and resilience in this new set of resources for K–12 educators featuring works of art that reflect the richness and diversity of the people, places, and cultures of the United States. Encourage creative, critical, and historical thinking in your students as you examine works of art from the country’s creation to the present day.

National Gallery of Art
4
 

Home

This collection was built as the beginning of a study of im/migration for third grade. The idea came from a teacher developed unit on the Re-imagining Migration site:  https://reimaginingmigration.o...

Since I teach 3rd grade, I needed to change parts of the unit because it was originally developed for high school students. The four main questions remained the same:

  1. How do we define home?
  2. Why do people leave their homes?
  3. What prevents people from feeling welcome in their new home?
  4. What can people do to create a welcoming community?

This collection is to explore the first question - how do we define home? Small groups of students each got a print out of one of the artworks pasted to a larger piece of paper. They then engaged with the See, Think, Wonder routine to examine another's idea of home before creating a picture of their idea of home.

Eveleen Eaton
28
 

Re-Imagining Migration DC Seminar Series, 2019-2020: Session 3

What are the habits of mind, heart, dialog and civility necessary to live in a world on the move?  
Exploring together an emerging set of socio-emotional routines.

This collection is the third in a series of four created to support the Re-Imagining Migration DC Seminar Series, held between December 2019 to March 2020. The seminar series is led by Verónica Boix Mansilla, Senior Principal Investigator for Harvard Graduate School of Education's Project Zero, and Research Director for Re-Imagining Migration, with in-gallery experiences provided by educators from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the National Museum of American History, the National Portrait Gallery, the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, and the National Gallery of Art.

This set of collections is designed to be dynamic. We will continue to add material, including participant-created content, throughout the seminar series so that the collections themselves can be used as a type of textbook, reflecting the content, development, and outputs of the full seminar series. Please check back to the hashtag #ReImaginingMigration to see a growing body of materials to support educators as they strive to serve and teach about human migration in relevant and deep ways.

Thank you to Beth Evans and Briana Zavadil White of the National Portrait Gallery for the in-gallery activity and supporting content.


#ReImaginingMigration

Key words: Reimagining Migration

Philippa Rappoport
46
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