Skip to Content
  • Language
  • End User
  • Educational Use
  • Time Required
(104)
(184)
(265)
(255)
(279)
(6)
(131)
(111)
(74)
(160)
(68)
(79)

Found 288 Collections

 

Método Científico

Consideramos lamentable que en algunas organizaciones se elabore mal su Metodo Cientifico
o no analizan las Etapas del Metodo Cientifico,  en otros casos  realizan una inadecuado
Tipo de Investigacion,   No conocen las aportaciones de Aristoteles,  

Por todo ello:

  • Se redacta la Visión sin base científica alguna, solo se busca una frase motivadora que se dice es el sueño de un líder.
  • Se redactan objetivos operativos los cuales  se los confunde con objetivos estratégicos.
  • Lo peor es que en la mayoría de estos “Planes Estratégicos” no se incluye ninguna estrategia.
  • O sea son Planes que de Estratégicos nada tienen.


mario vazquez
1
 

AFRICAN COSMOS

Put the ARTS in STEM - From Egypt to South Africa, take a brief tour of the African Cosmos  and have your students discover the intersection of Art and Astronomy in the southern hemisphere.   Explore constellations only seen on the African continent.  See why the Goliath beetle became a symbol of rebirth for the Egyptian scarab.  Learn about celestial navigation by people and animals. 

Create Your Own Constellation!  Request Activity sheets for your classroom.

Submit your class constellations to our Student Gallery and be a part of your own school's online exhibition!


Deborah Stokes
21
 

Martin Luther King Jr.: The Later Years (1965 - 1968)

Martin Luther King Jr.’s fight for equality did not end with the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. In his last years, King’s focus shifted toward achieving economic equality and combating poverty in the United States, denouncing the United States’ involvement in the Vietnam War, and contending with the rise of The Black Power Movement.

 This Learning Lab highlights documents, images, objects, and media from the National Museum of African American History and Culture and other Smithsonian units that help to tell the story of Martin Luther King Jr.’s final years, his assassination, and his enduring legacy.

Keywords: nmaahc, Martin Luther King Jr, MLK, Jr., African American, civil rights, last years, Chicago, Vietnam, poverty, Poor People's Campaign, Resurrection City, Memphis, assassination, legacy, Coretta Scott King, Reverend 

NMAAHC Education
48
 

Korean+Art+Culture+Language

This Learning Lab Collection is designed for students who are studying Korean. Students will explore Korean art from the Freer collection, and learn more about Korean culture, history, and tradition by using artworks. Through the exploring art and learning Korean process, student will develop a greater understanding of the unique aspects of Korean culture and the structure of Korean language. 

Keywords: Korean, Language, Art, Culture, Tradition

#AsiaTeachers

This Learning Lab Collection is following Virginia Department of Education Standards of Learning for World Language: Non-Roman Alphabet Language for character-based language. Click here to find more information (p. 29-46) 

Level 1: Students begin to develop communicative competence in the target language and expand their understanding of the culture(s) of the people who speak the language.

Level 2: Students continue to develop their communicative and cultural competence by interacting orally and in writing with other speakers of the target language, understanding oral and written messages in the language, and making oral and written presentations in the language.

Level 3: Students communicate on a variety of topics at a level commensurate with their study, using structures that are more complex in the language and moving from concrete to more abstract concepts in a variety of time frames.

Level 4: Students continue to develop their communicative and culture competence in the interpersonal, interpretive, and presentational modes of communication.

Level 5: Students are able to exchange and support opinions on a variety of topics related to historical and contemporary events and issues at a proficiency level commensurate with their study. 


SSCCKoreanSchool
25
 

Rediscovering Korea's Past - Goryeo Period

The Goryeo period (918-1392) is referred to as Korea’s age of enlightenment, when arts and cultures flourished under the patronage of the Goryeo aristocracy. Buddhism was the official state religion, which Buddhist temples and members of the royal court committed a huge portion of their resources to the practice of faith and to the creation of ritual implements and artworks as expressions of devotion. 

Tremendous ceramics, lacquer wares, Buddhist paintings and sculptures, illustrated manuscripts, and metal crafts in Buddhist symbols and motifs were made during this period. The Goryeo period is widely known as the jade-green glazed, graceful shape, elegant floral motifs and decorative inlaid design celadons to the Western culture.  

This Learning Lab Collection is created for Summer Institute for Educators, Discovering Korea's Past: Interdisciplinary Connections. 

Keywords: Korea, Goryeo, Celadon, Buddhism, Inlay, Jade-green, Glazed, Ceramics

#AsiaTeachers

Minchi Hyun
21
 

Parks and Playgrounds: Preschool

Use these pictures to help your child make careful observations of their world and use words to describe what they think and wonder about.  This collection is meant to stimulate curiosity and develop vocabulary with the youngest learners. There are conversation starters among the images, but be sure to let the child's interest and your own questions drive the discussion. 

Combine these images with real-world examples from your child's books, toys, or your own community. If you're interested in learning more about an individual image, click on the "i" icon located in the top left to view the museum description. 

This has been adapted from the Project Zero's “See Think Wonder" Visible Thinking routine, meant for exploring works of art and other interesting things.

A free printable version is included at the end of the collection. 

#visiblethinking

Cody Coltharp
17
 

Animal Masks

Allow small groups to "look/think/wonder" about a mask image:  Look and describe what you see. Based on what you see, what do you think the mask is for? What do you wonder about the mask (or want to learn about the mask)? Then allow students to click the Information button to learn more. Groups can report out to the whole class.

Facilitate a discussion with students using some open ended questions:

  • Why do people make and wear masks?
  • What can be hidden or revealed using a mask?
  • What might a mask symbolize or stand for?
  • If you were to design a mask for a special purpose, what would it look like?

Direct students to sketch their ideas to plan for creating a mask.



Jean-Marie Galing
11
 

Time

The theme of TIME can be explored in art using key concepts throughout the semester or year. Explore various concepts related to the idea of TIME by playing the Connections Card Game. The mind maps made after playing the game can be used as a reference throughout the course. 

Teacher Preparation:

  • Download and print images on card stock (resource attached to this collection). Create multiple sets for small groups to play the game.
  • Print Key Concept Cards (resource attached to this collection)

Student Activity:

  • Take turns choosing a card and connecting it to a key concept by placing it near an appropriate Concept Card.
  • Defend choice with evidence in the image.
  • After all cards have been played, students make inferences about how people experience, measure or represent time.
  • Small groups collaborate to draw a mind map to illustrate their ideas.
  • Present maps in a "Carousel Interview." One group member stays with the mind map to answer questions; other group members visit tables to explore mind maps and ask questions.
  • Return to original group. Encapsulate overarching ideas and record them on your group's mind map.
Jean-Marie Galing
28
 

Examining the Transcontinental Railroad

Railroads started well before 1869, but it was not until that year that the nation was bound together by a commitment to build the first transcontinental system. On May 10, 1869, the driving of a golden spike, signaled the ceremonial end to a process that had been going on for 6 years of construction, engineering, and human toil. Two companies, one starting in Omaha, Nebraska and the other in Sacramento, California competed to lay track towards each other to join the Central Pacific and Union Pacific Railroads. Their reward for each mile was government money and lots of it. By the time that they met at Promontory Summit, Utah, vast sums of money and untold human labor and sacrifice had been expended on this incredible technical endeavor. A single track united the continent's Wester and Eastern regions. Travel from East to West used to take months by wagon train, could now be measured in mere days. This collection utilizes Primary Source student review strategies from the Library of Congress' Primary Source Analysis Tools

Brian Ausland
14
 

Clarice Jessie Daley-WWI Nurse

Clarice Daley served as a nurse in the First World War (1914-1918) with the Australian Army Nursing Service. 

Keywords: women, history, military, 

Jessica Rosenberry
8
 

Sites Unseen: Navigating Complexity and Grappling with Uncertainty

Trevor Paglen: Sites Unseen combines the disciplines of art, science, and investigative journalism to bring unseen and, at times, unsettling elements of our contemporary world to light. Zooming outward from personal, to local, and finally global implications of this work, participants will work collaboratively to identify extensions and troubleshoot any challenges of this content for the classroom.

All Grade Levels

Elizabeth Dale-Deines
15
 

Express Yourself: Creating a Graphic Novel Exploring Identity with the National Portrait Gallery

Considering the growing popularity of the graphic novel, could they be a venue for your students to explore and express identity? This collection offers interactive activities that incorporate building the structure of comic book and graphic novel pages. Utilizing the special exhibition Eye to I: Self-Portraits from 1900 to Today, this workshop takes a close look at self-portraiture as a means of exploring identity. The ideas here were presented by Sean Murphy, art teacher at Samuel Tucker Elementary School, in Fall 2018 and Spring 2019. 

#NPGteach

Briana White
21
 

World War II: artifacts / Pacific Aviation Museum

Is the best picture for me

Lucia Sanipatin
7
 

Industrial Revolution

  • Industrial Revolution, in modern history, the process of change from an agrarian and handicraft economy to one dominated by industry and machine manufacturing. This process began in Britain in the 18th century and from there spread to other parts of the world. Although used earlier by French writers, the term Industrial Revolution was first popularized by the English economic historian Arnold Toynbee (1852–83) to describe Britain’s economic development from 1760 to 1840. Since Toynbee’s time the term has been more broadly applied.
Alejandra Diaz
2
 

Discovering Korea Through an Object

This collection was created as an introduction to Korea and its culture by focusing on one object in the Freer/Sackler Museum.  "Water dropper in the form of a duck." Interdisciplinary lesson for Media (information literacy, research skills), Art (calligraphy), and Music (children’s songs).  

Susan Schmidt
6
 

Behind Design: Inka Bridge

Introduction

How might we learn about cultures through the study of artifacts? What role could the study of design elements and process play in in deepening our understanding? How could we leverage student agency of the design process to gain opportunities to recognize relationships between artifacts and culture.

This collection provides opportunities for students to uncover complexity by looking closely and making connections between cultures and the design process behind the artifacts. Student claims are based on evidence using provided resources for investigation. The Artifact Investigation Map serves as a visible thinking tool for documenting our understanding of a culture by making connections between the artifact and our research.

Procedure

Begin by looking closely at an artifact, INCA BRIDGE, using a Project Zero Routine, Zoom In or See Think Wonder. Through close examination, we begin to develop hypotheses about the object and the connections to the culture. While a main goal is to learn more about the culture related to the artifact, we are also building a capacity for using this thinking process to build understanding. Record and display class ideas generated through this routine. In the discussion of culture, we are looking at how people live: What do the people value? What are their priorities and motivations?

Introduce the points of The Artifact Investigation Map. Ask students, “How could this be used to organize the ideas documented from the thinking routine about the artifact and the people who created it?”. (Students may recognize this as the Engineering Design Process.) Building on our initial Zoom In documentation, the group connects the artifact ideas to the map points. Different questions within each point may serve as prompts to continue making connections and lead to more questions about what we still wonder, guiding the next research steps. Provide a space to record and share new questions during the process.

Begin the research process with the first video Weaving the Bridge at Q'eswacha. Using information from the source, model the process of organizing the findings using the different points on The Artifact Investigation Map. Be sure to highlight unanswered questions in the map as the class decides the future steps in the research. Support the student use of resource-based evidence starting from this Learning Lab collection when making and documenting claims. Depending on the learners, this phase may vary in the structure of guidance and interaction. Documentation is shared with an emphasis on providing opportunities to discuss the claims, findings, and analysis.


Guiding Points for Inquiry using The Artifact Investigation Map:

Ask: What needs or problems might this artifact address/solve? Does this design reflect empathy for a particular group or person?

Imagine: What possible prototypes or variations might have been produced in the timeline of this artifact? Could there have been earlier versions leading to this one?  

Plan: Identify and describe what could have been key factors influencing design process. Examples: materials/natural resources, people power, skills, technology/tools, historical and natural environment….

(Re)Create: Describe the possible steps taken to create the artifact. What could this look like? Options include for this exploration: Try to create a mini-version or reenact one of the steps of the process. Use observations of the process to draw possible conclusions about the culture. Sketch or act out the steps. Take a part of the process and use the Step Inside thinking routine. *Document and share this process with the group in order to prepare for the next phase of The Artifact Investigation Map

Improvements: Since the creation of this artifact, what versions do we see today? What would the biography of this type of innovation look like? How might this type of artifact connect to modern innovation? *Extension for Improvements: Use the thinking routine Imagine If to evaluate a modern iteration of the artifact. How does it compare to the original?


Documenting Ongoing Conclusions/Questions/Reflections

Throughout the investigation, students share and post supported claims about the culture and reflect upon the process of using the design cycle to guide the study.

For the final reflection, use the thinking routine I Used to Think, Now I Think… to look for changes in thinking. Keep the process and research lines of thinking open for continued exploration with the unanswered questions.

#PZPGH

Erik Lindemann
32
 

The Invention of Thanksgiving

This collection explores the evolving history of how Americans celebrate Thanksgiving. The introductory video, podcast and lesson in the collection help provide context for the complicated portrayal and depiction of what actually happened at the first Thanksgiving and how it is celebrated today.

The images in this collection are different portrayals of the holiday over time. They have been grouped in order of publication from 1863 to 1994. As you look through them and complete the activities, think about these three key questions:

  • How does the context in which an image was produced affect the result? Meaning, how does what was happening at the time affect what kind of picture of Thanksgiving we see?
  • What do the images say about our national identity: who is welcome in the United States? What do we celebrate and why? Whose version of the Thanksgiving story does each image tell?

This collection was adapted from Kate Harris' collection, Thanksgiving-- A Reflection of A Nation and supplemented with the National Museum of the American Indian's Americans online exhibition. 

#historicalthinking


Ashley Naranjo
19
 

Exploring Simple Machines and the Complexities of Rube Goldberg Inventions

This collection explores the concept of Rube Goldberg inventions and their use of multi-step processes to complete an action. Often Rube Goldberg inventions utilize a series of simple machines to cause a chain reaction for a task. Using an image of a comic that features one such invention, students can analyze the parts, purposes and complexities of the object and its processes. Additional resources are included to support the further exploration of these inventions and the identification of the simple machines (levers, pulleys, wedges, screws, wheels, axles and inclined planes). 

This collection complements an in-person visit to the Rube Goldberg™: The World of Hilarious Invention! Exhibit at the Children's Museum of Pittsburgh.

#PZPGH

Ashley Naranjo
15
 

Analyzing an Oral History Interview: Grant Ichikawa

This collection includes an oral history interview with Grant Hayao Ichikawa (April 17, 1919- December 3, 2017). Ichikawa was a U. S. Army veteran who enlisted after he was relocated to a Japanese American incarceration camp with his family in 1942. The interview includes a first-hand account of the impact of the bombing of Pearl Harbor on Japanese Americans.

Complementary resources to the podcast audio file include: a National Museum of American History teachers' guide and images, Smithsonian Libraries' graphic organizers for evaluating historical sources, a Smithsonian Folklife and Cultural Heritage guide to conducting your own oral history, and additional video and audio oral histories with Grant Ichikawa from the Library of Congress American Folklife Center. 

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. 

Keywords: Congressional Gold Medal, veteran, internment camps, World War II, commission, wartime, close listening

#APA2018

Ashley Naranjo
23
 

Analyzing Oral History Interviews: Asian Indian Community of Cleveland, Ohio

This collection includes a series of oral history interviews the Asian Indian Community of Cleveland, Ohio from 2013. Ten Asian Indians who settled in the Greater Cleveland region during the 1950s and 1960s were interviewed by middle and high school students. These interviews document their unique immigrant experiences and focus on professional, family and religious life.

Complementary resources to the podcast files include: a National Museum of American History teachers' guide and images, Smithsonian Libraries' graphic organizers for evaluating historical sources, and a Smithsonian Folklife and Cultural Heritage guide to conducting your own oral history.

Interviewees include: Ajeet Singh Sood, Batuk Modi, Dipti P. Roy, Elizabeth and Winfred Balraj,  Gulab Khandelwal,  Ivan Tewarson, Kul Bhushan, Om Julka, Paramjit Singh, P.K. and Virginia Saha,  Ramachandran Balasubramaniam, Ranajit Datta, Sam Rajiah, Shanta and Surinder Kampani, Shiv and Saroj Aggarwal, Vijay Rastogi, Vinay and Surinder Bhardwaj

#APA2018

This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. 

Ashley Naranjo
10
 

Behind Design: Exploring American Indian Cultures Through Artifact Investigation

Introduction

How might we learn about cultures through the study of artifacts? What role could the study of design elements and process play in in deepening our understanding? How could we leverage student agency of the design process to gain opportunities to recognize relationships between artifacts and culture.

This collection provides opportunities for students to uncover complexity by looking closely and making connections between cultures and the design process behind the artifacts. Student claims are based on evidence using provided resources for investigation. The Artifact Investigation Map serves as a visible thinking tool for documenting our understanding of a culture by making connections between the artifact and our research.

Procedure

Begin by looking closely at an artifact, Lone Dog Winter Count, using a Project Zero Routine, Zoom In. Through close examination, we begin to develop hypotheses about the object and the connections to the culture. While a main goal is to learn more about the culture related to the artifact, we are also building a capacity for using this thinking process to build understanding. Record and display class ideas generated through this routine. In the discussion of culture, we are looking at how people live: What do the people value? What are their priorities and motivations?

Introduce the points of The Artifact Investigation Map. Ask students, “How could this be used to organize the ideas documented from the thinking routine about the artifact and the people who created it?”. (Students may recognize this as the Engineering Design Process.) Building on our initial Zoom In documentation, the group connects the artifact ideas to the map points. Different questions within each point may serve as prompts to continue making connections and lead to more questions about what we still wonder, guiding the next research steps. Provide a space to record and share new questions during the process.

Begin the research process with the first video Lakota Winter Counts. Using information from the source, model the process of organizing the findings using the different points on The Artifact Investigation Map. Be sure to highlight unanswered questions in the map as the class decides the future steps in the research. Support the student use of resource-based evidence starting from this Learning Lab collection when making and documenting claims. Depending on the learners, this phase may vary in the structure of guidance and interaction. Documentation is shared with an emphasis on providing opportunities to discuss the claims, findings, and analysis.


Guiding Points for Inquiry using The Artifact Investigation Map:

Ask: What needs or problems might this artifact address/solve? Does this design reflect empathy for a particular group or person?

Imagine: What possible prototypes or variations might have been produced in the timeline of this artifact? Could there have been earlier versions leading to this one?  

Plan: Identify and describe what could have been key factors influencing design process. Examples: materials/natural resources, people power, skills, technology/tools, historical and natural environment….

(Re)Create: Describe the possible steps taken to create the artifact. What could this look like? Options include for this exploration: Try to create a mini-version or reenact one of the steps of the process. Use observations of the process to draw possible conclusions about the culture. Sketch or act out the steps. Take a part of the process and use the Step Inside thinking routine. *Document and share this process with the group in order to prepare for the next phase of The Artifact Investigation Map

Improvements: Since the creation of this artifact, what versions do we see today? What would the biography of this type of innovation look like? How might this type of artifact connect to modern innovation? *Extension for Improvements: Use the thinking routine Imagine If to evaluate a modern iteration of the artifact. How does it compare to the original?


Documenting Ongoing Conclusions/Questions/Reflections

Throughout the investigation, students share and post supported claims about the culture and reflect upon the process of using the design cycle to guide the study.

For the final reflection, use the thinking routine I Used to Think, Now I Think… to look for changes in thinking. Keep the process and research lines of thinking open for continued exploration with the unanswered questions.

#PZPGH

Andrea Croft
30
 

Six Degrees of Separation: An APUSH Review Activity

Use this collection as a starting point for an AP United States History review activity that emphasizes connections and cause-and-effect. Students will copy the collection and add in four resources that form a chain of connection from one item to another (ending with six resources total). For each resource, they should add an annotation describing each of the events or items included, analyzing any important details in the resources themselves, and explaining how each connects to the next one.
Hattie Petty
2
 

Digital Storytelling to Explore Latinx History, Arts and Culture

This Learning Lab collection was made to support teachers and educators participating in the "Exploring Latinx Artists from the Frost Art Museum Collection" Workshop, to reflect on their experience. This program received Federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center.

This workshops is organised by the Patricia & Phillip Frost Art Museum and the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access, and aims at sharing digital resources and tools for the classroom available from the Smithsonian Learning Lab (learninglab.si.edu). During the workshop,  co-facilitated by Dr Antonia Liguori (Loughborugh University, UK) and Dr Philippa Rappoport (SCLDA), participants will learn how to create a lesson plan using digital resources and how to enhance their students' learning experience through Digital Storytelling.

In particular this collection represents an introduction on how to apply Digital Storytelling within the Learning Lab as a teaching strategy and a self-reflective tool to stimulate active and deep learning.

You will find here:

- a short ice-breaker activity to start shifting from a cognitive appreciation of art to a personal connection to museum objects;

- some examples of digital stories made by other educators during previous Digital Storytelling workshops 'embedded' in the Learning Lab;

- a description of the Digital Storytelling process, with templates for storyboarding and a few tips for audio and video editing;

- some prompts to start drafting a script for the Digital Story that will be made in a following workshop.

#LatinoHAC

Antonia Liguori
19
 

Engineering Flight

This is a master collection designed to be copied and adapted to your individual classroom needs. Included are three scalable student activities that teach students engineering skills using methods similar to those that made the Wright brothers pioneers of aviation. Feel free to pick and choose from the activities in creating your own collections:

1. The Four Forces of Flight

In this student activity, students will briefly go over the four forces of flight (lift, drag, weight, and thrust) and put them to the test in the Paper Airplane Challenge! This activity is suitable for Primary/Intermediate grade levels.

2. Engineering the Wright Way

The second student activity is an online interactive, "Engineering the Wright Way"*, where students will develop engineering skills to design and test all the different components of an airplane based on the the Wrights' methodology. Students can write down a save code generated in the interactive to store their progress and return to finish the activity later. This activity is suitable for Intermediate/Middle grade levels.

3. Take a Wright Flight

The third student activity is an online flight simulator to learn three controls of flight: yaw, pitch, and roll. The final segment is an online interactive** to test fly the original Wright Flyer in conditions similar to that cold December morning when the Wrights first achieved flight, using direct 3D scans of the original Wright Flyer made by the Smithsonian. This activity is suitable for all grades.


*The "Engineering the Wright Way" lesson plan and activity were created by the National Air and Space Museum, courtesy of the Alcoa Foundation.

**The Wright Brothers Flyer activity was created by the Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.

This is one of 5 activities used in the Lenovo Week of Service event.

Cody Coltharp
19
1-24 of 288 Collections