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"Four Indian Kings," Face-to-Face portrait talk

National Portrait Gallery
Martin Sullivan, director of NPG, discusses portraits from the exhibition "Four Indian Kings"

"Herblock's Presidents: 'Puncturing Pomposity'" exhibition, interview with Sid Hart, NPG senior historian

National Portrait Gallery
NPG historian Sid Hart discusses "Herblock's Presidents: 'Puncturing Pomposity.'" Interview by Warren Perry.

"One Life: The Mask of Lincoln" exhibition - interview with David Ward, NPG historian

National Portrait Gallery
David Ward, historian at NPG, discusses "One Life: The Mask of Lincoln." Interview by Warren Perry

"Portrait of Marcel Duchamp, 3 leads" by artist Brian O'Doherty, Face-to-Face talk

National Portrait Gallery
James McManus, professor of art history, California State University, Chico, discusses Brian O' Doherty's work "Portrait of Marcel Duchamp, 3 leads" on view in the exhibition "Inventing Marcel Duchamp: The Dynamics of Portraiture"

"Sarah, David" portrait by photographer Yolanda del Amo, Face-to-Face talk

National Portrait Gallery
Carolyn Carr, deputy director of the National Portrait Gallery, discusses the photograph "Sarah, David" by artist Yolanda del Amo . She also discussed the Outwin Boochever Portrait Competition.

1960s San Francisco rock groups, Face-to-Face talk

National Portrait Gallery
Amy Baskette, curatorial assistant at NPG, discusses a 1967 photograph of the Grateful Dead and Big Brother and the Holding Company, by Irving Penn

2001: An AirSpace Odyssey

National Air and Space Museum

It’s the 50th anniversary of one of the slowest, strangest, and yet, most referenced science fiction films of all time – 2001: A Space Odyssey. It may be your FAVORITE movie, or, quite possibly, you’ve never actually seen it in its 142-minute entirety. Emily, Matt, and Nick break it down for you – Cliff’s Notes on the plot, the collaborations that made the film so realistic, and the first peeks at technologies that really exist today. Become cocktail party conversant about why a 50 year old science fiction movie remains so relevant and what current sci-fi says about our world today and the years ahead.

50 Shades of Gray Whales

Smithsonian Institution

Happy New Year! We’re busy working on a new batch of Sidedoor episodes and while you wait, we wanted to re-share a story we like from the fall, just in case you missed it the first time around. From 6,000-year-old cave paintings to silver screen stars in movies like Free Willy, whales have long captured the human imagination. And it makes sense—they're among the largest and most intelligent creatures to ever live on our planet. This time on Sidedoor, we’ll explore our surprising relationship with whales through the lens of one species: the gray whale. Once aggressively hunted and thought to be nearly extinct, they've rebounded to become one of the North Pacific’s most abundant whale species. So, what changed?

50 Shades of Gray Whales

Smithsonian Institution

From 6,000-year-old cave paintings to silver screen stars in movies like Free Willy, whales have long captured the human imagination. And it makes sense—they're among the largest and most intelligent creatures to ever live on our planet. This time on Sidedoor, we’ll explore our surprising relationship with whales through the lens of one species: the gray whale. Once aggressively hunted and thought to be nearly extinct, they've rebounded to become one of the North Pacific’s most abundant whale species. So, what changed?

A Conversation with Alice Waters

National Portrait Gallery
A Conversation with Alice Waters

A Conversation with Andrew Young

National Portrait Gallery
Ambassador Andrew Young, joined by his longtime friend Jack H. Watson Jr., discusses his role in the American Civil Rights movement.

A Crane with a Crush

Smithsonian Institution

Chris Crowe, an animal keeper for the Smithsonian, has an unlikely bond with Walnut, a female white-naped crane. Despite their obvious differences, she chose him as her mate. For Crowe, their relationship has high stakes: it impacts the future of an entire species. Venture with Sidedoor to the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute to meet this unconventional couple, and find out how their connection could be key to white-naped crane survival.

A Right to the City

Smithsonian Institution

In Washington, D.C., the neighborhood of Anacostia was once dismissed as the wrong side of the river. Now, it is turning into a housing hotspot as the city sees an influx of newer, wealthier residents. It’s called gentrification, and the process has become a flashpoint from Houston to Harlem and beyond. We’ll explore this longtime fight for housing through an innovative community museum that empowers local residents—kids and adults—to tell the stories of these changing neighborhoods.

A Tausug reading of The Mi'raj, 1965-1966 [sound recording]

National Anthropological Archives
Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

Track information transcribed from list provided by H. Arlo Nimmo.

Possibly recorded by Nimmo's research assistant, Tarabasa Idji in his home village in Karundung, Sanga-Sanga, Tawi-Tawi.

Abraham Lincoln portrait, Face-to-Face talk

National Portrait Gallery
David Ward, historian at NPG, discusses Lincoln, and a selection of portraits in the exhibition "One Life: The Mask of Lincoln"

Abraham Lincoln: Prankster-in-Chief

Smithsonian Institution

We all know Abraham Lincoln, right? Well, we know one side of him—the grave-faced leader of a troubled country—but behind the face on the penny lies an unlikely jokester. This week, Sidedoor reveals the rascally side of our 16th president, and does it with a brand-new sound.

Adam Goodheart, author talk

National Portrait Gallery
"1861: The Civil War Awakening" discussion by author Adam Goodheart

Address by Langston Hughes 1947 January 24

Anacostia Community Museum Archives
Recorded in Chicago, IL on January 24, 1947at Roosevelt College, now Roosevelt University.

Digital audio file (MP3 format, 5.81 MB, 4 min. 14 sec.)

The Lorenzo Dow Turner papers were donated to the Anacostia Community Museum in 2003 by Professor Turner's widow, Lois Turner Williams. Additional materials were donated in the spring of 2010 by Mrs. Turner Williams.

Disc Note: Address continued Prof. Hughes 1-24-1947 (13)

Langston Hughes reading his poems Madam and Her Madam and Madam and The Rent Man.

After Pepcahàc opening all night sing March 25, 1979 [sound recording]

National Anthropological Archives
Digitization and preparation of these materials for online access has been funded through generous support from the Arcadia Fund.

R-Canela 1979, reel no. 68 Song to break the wasps' nest and the song after than for capturing.

Agnes Ernst Meyer by Marius De Zayas

National Portrait Gallery

Ainu 1 (Original), June 22, 1965 [sound recording]

National Anthropological Archives
A recording made in Noboribetsu, Hokkaido, Japan during an ethnographic study of child life. Contents of reel 1; Commentator: Shigeru Kayano (male age 40); 1. Ionnokka: Lullaby, sung to a baby on mother's back, by Toroshino Kaizawa (female age 75); 2. Shinta sue ionnokka: cradle song (lullaby), by Toroshino Kaizawa (female age 75); 3. Lullaby: Sleep without crying, by Haru Maeda (female age 61); 4. Yaishama: improvised song, by Toroshino Kaizawa (female age 75); 5. Yaishama: improvised song, by Ume Kaizawa (female age 74); 6. Upopos, by Toroshino Kaizawa (female age 75), Ume Kaizawa (female age 74), Haru Maeda (female age 61).

Ainu 1 [edit], June 22, 1965 [sound recording]

National Anthropological Archives
Edited version of a recording made in Noboribetsu, Hokkaido, Japan during an ethnographic study of child life. The recording has been edited by Sano (December 1965). 'Contents of reel 1; Commentator: Shigeru Kayano (male age 40); 1. Ionnokka: Lullaby, sung to a baby on mother's back, by Toroshino Kaizawa (female age 75); 2. Shinta sue ionnokka: cradle song (lullaby), by Toroshino Kaizawa (female age 75); 3. Lullaby: Sleep without crying, by Haru Maeda (female age 61); 4. Yaishama: improvised song, by Toroshino Kaizawa (female age 75); 5. Yaishama: improvised song, by Ume Kaizawa (female age 74); 6. Upopos, by Toroshino Kaizawa (female age 75), Ume Kaizawa (female age 74), Haru Maeda (female age 61).

Ainu 2 (Original), August 4, 1965 [sound recording]

National Anthropological Archives
A recording made in Mr. Teshi's shop in Akan, Hokkaido, Japan during an ethnographic study of child life. Contents of reel 2; 1. Mukkuri (musical instrument), by Kisa Shitakawara (female age 78).

Ainu 2 [edit], July 9, 1965 [sound recording]

National Anthropological Archives
A recording made in Akan, Hokkaido, Japan during an ethnographic study of child life. The recording has been edited by Sano (December 1965). 'Contents of reel 2; 1. Mukkuri (musical instrument), by Kisa Shitakawara (female age 78).
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