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Oral history interview with Richard Schultz, 2012 September 25-26

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 110 pages.

An interview of Richard Schultz conducted 2012 September 25-26, by Jeannine Falino, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at Schultz's home, in Brattleboro, Vermont.

Oral history interview with Julius Shulman, 1990 January 12-February 3

Archives of American Art
Sound recordings: 4 sound cassettes (60 min.) : analog.

Transcript: 123 pages.

An interview of Julius Shulman conducted 1990 January 12-February 3, by Taina Rikala De Noriega, for the Archives of American Art.

Oral history interview with Lawrence Anderson, 1992 January 30-March 30

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 187 pages

An interview of Lawrence Anderson conducted 1992 January 30-March 30, by Robert F. Brown, for the Archives of American Art.

Anderson speaks about: his childhood in rural Minnesota, youth in Minneapolis, education at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's School of Architecture and Planning, and at L'Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Paris; his studies, teachers and fellow students; teaching at the University of Virginia and MIT; colleagues and students at MIT; partnership with Herbert Beckwith and buildings by their firm; Alvar Aalto, Deans William Emerson, William Wurster and Pietro Belluschi; projects on which he has served as an architectural advisor; and competitions he has juried.

Oral history interview with Doug Ashford, 2016 October 14-November 3

Archives of American Art
3 sound files (4 hrs., 28 min.) digital, wav

Transcript: 71 pages.

An interview with Doug Ashford conducted 2016 October 14 and November 3, by Theodore Kerr, for the Archives of American Art's Visual Arts and the AIDS Epidemic: An Oral History Project, at Ashford's studio in Brooklyn, New York.

Oral history interview with David Best, 2007 October 23-December 6

Archives of American Art
Sound recording: 4 sound discs (6 hr., 28 min.) : digital ; 2 5/8 in.

Transcript: 153 pages

An interview of David Best conducted 2007 October 23 and December 6, by Mija Riedel, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at Best's home and studio, in Petaluma, California.

Oral history interview with Carmen Lomas Garza, 1997 Apr. 10-May 27

Archives of American Art
Sound recording: 5 sound cassettes (4 hrs.) : analog.

Transcript: 122 p.

An interview of Carmen Lomas Garza conducted 1997 Apr. 10-May 27, by Paul Karlstrom, for the Archives of American Art.

Lomas Garza discusses her working environment at Hunter Point Shipyard, a former naval facility on San Francisco Bay, near Candlestick Park, occupied by artists and small businesses; growing up in Kingsville, Tex., near Corpus Christi; her education at Texas A and I University (now Texas A and M) and graduating from the University of Texas at Austin with a B.S. in art education (1969); her activism in the Chicano movement during her college years; joining the farm workers march in Kingsville in 1965; installing an art show for MAYO (Mexican Workers Youth Organization) conference in 1969; the impact upon her of MAYO's walkout at Robstown High School, Tex., while she was a student teacher there, in protest of the lack of Mexican American teachers and curriculum; joining Galeria de La Raza in San Francisco, 1976, while a graduate student at Washington State University and the effect it had on the development of her career as an artist; the inspiration of her mother, who painted "lotteria tablas" (figures on boards; game cards); her interest in children's art; using family experiences for her "monitos" or "little figures" (cards painted with sets of fifteen numbers); and preserving her Mexican-American traditions as a basis for her identity.

Oral history interview with Esther Dick Gottlieb, 1981 Oct. 22

Archives of American Art
Sound recording: 2 cassettes : analog.

Transcript: 23 p.

An interview of Esther Gottlieb conducted 1981 Oct. 22, by Phyllis Tuchman, for the Archives of American Art's Mark Rothko and His Times oral history project.

Gottlieb recalls the art scene of the 1930s and 1940s as it touched Mark Rothko, speaking of The Ten and the Artists' Union and, in particular, Adolph Gottlieb, Milton Avery, Barnett Newman, and John Graham; Nahum Tschacbasov is mentioned briefly. She discusses the activities of various galleries and talks about the work of the Rothko, Gottlieb, and Longview Foundations.

Oral history interview with William Hesthal, 1964 Dec. 22

Archives of American Art
Sound recordings: 1 sound tape reel (45 min.) ; 5 in.

Transcript: 16 p.

An interview of William Hesthal conducted by Mary Fuller McChesney on 1964 Dec. 22 for the Archives of American Art.

Hesthal speaks of his art education; working on the easel and lithography projects for the Federal Art Project; surrealist influences on the FAP artists; and his opinions on federally sponsored art programs.

Oral history interview with Valerie Jaudon, 2009 Oct. 8-Dec. 22

Archives of American Art
Sound recording, master: 3 WMA files (5 hr., 43 min.) digital; 2 5/8 in.

Transcript: 95 pages.

An interview of Valerie Jaudon conducted 2009 Oct. 8-Dec. 22, by Avis Berman, for the Archives of American Art's U.S. General Services Administration, Design Excellence and the Arts oral history project, at Jaudon's studio, in New York, N.Y.

Jaudon speaks of her family and early life in Greenville, MS; her early interactions with visual art; her education at Mississippi University for Women in Columbus and Memphis Academy of Art in Tennessee; her time as an art student at University of the Americas in Mexico City and at St. Martin's School of Art in London; her early career as an artist in New York City and her work for the architecture firm of Romaldo Giurgola; her involvement with the pattern painting and feminist art movements of the mid-1970s; her experience of being represented by dealers Holly Solomon and Sidney Janis; the artistic influences in her paintings and their formal development from the early 1970s to the present; commissioned works and installations for private and public spaces, including "Long Division" (1988), for the 23rd St. and Lexington Ave. subway station in New York City; "Reunion" (1989), for the Police Plaza at the Municipal Building in New York City; "Free Style" (1989), for the Athletic and Swim Club at the Equitable Center in New York City; "Pilot" (1989), for the City Hall in Atlanta, GA; "Eastern Standard" (1991), for the Rudin Building in New York City; "Refraction" (1994), for Staten Island College in New York City; "Blue Pools Courtyard" (1993), for the Birmingham Museum of Art in Alabama; "Solstice" (1996), at Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport; "Measure for Measure" (1999), at the Städel Museum in Frankfurt, Germany; and her two GSA commissions: "Portal South, Portal North" (2002), for the Federal Courthouse in Jacksonville, FL; and "Filippine Garden" (2004), for the Thomas Eagleton Courthouse in St. Louis, MO. Jaudon also recalls the following individuals: Lawrence Alloway, Frank Auerbach, Gillian Ayres, Francis Bacon, Jim Balsley, Edward Larrabee Barnes, Lynda Benglis, Bruno Bischofberger, Scott Burton, Anthony Caro, Leo Castelli, Martin Craig, Louise Deutschman, John Duff, Thomas Francis Eagleton, Edward Louis Filippine, Eric Fischl, Conrad Fisher, James Ingo Freed, Lucian Freud, Jennifer Gibson, Fran­coise Gilot, Mitchell Giurgola, Paola Giurgola, Barbara Gladstone, Amy Goldin, Eugene Goossens, Frederick Gore, Dan Graham, Marcia Hafif, Lindsay Hannich, Al Held, Eva Hesse, Peter Howard, Carroll Janis, Harriet Janis, Neil Jenney, Jasper Johns, Louis Kahn, Richard Kalina, Allan Kaprow, Ivan Karp, Jane Kaufman, Willem de Kooning, Leon Kossoff, Joyce Kozloff, Cynthia Krauss, Sol Lewitt, Dorothy Lichtenstein, Roy Lichtenstein, Bob Loeb, Morris Louis, Kim MacConnel, Brice Marden, Gabriel Mayer, Ronay Menschel, Stephen Miotto, Mary Miss, Piet Mondrian, Henry Mundy, Betty Parsons, Cesar Pelli, Larry Poons, Tony Robin, Dorothea Rockburne, Randy Rosen, Aldo Rossi, Jonas Salk, Miriam Schapiro, Bernard Schmalenbach, Alfred Schmela, George Segal, Helen Segal, Rena Segal, Richard Serra, Ned Smyth, Horace Solomon, Pari Stave, Frank Stella, Gary Stephan, Margret Stuffmann, Robert Venturi, Joan Ward, Andy Warhol, Tom Wesselmann, Isabel Wilson, Mario Yrisarry, Robert Zakanitch, Barbara Zucker; and others.

Oral history interview with Reuben Kadish, 1992 Apr. 15

Archives of American Art
Sound recording: 1 sound cassette.

Transcript: 40 p.

An interview of Reuben Kadish conducted 1992 Apr. 15, by Stephen Polcari, for the Archives of American Art. Kadish discusses designing murals for the WPA in the 1930s; working as an artist in the South Pacific for the U.S. Army during World War II; the N.Y. art scene in the 1940s; and his views on government support of the arts and on art censorship. He recalls Jackson Pollock.

Oral history interview with Gyöngy Laky, 2007 December 11-12

Archives of American Art
Sound recordings: 11 sound files (4 hr., 8 min.) digital, wav

Transcript: 66 pages

An interview of Gyöngy Laky conducted 2007 December 11-12, by Mija Riedel, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at Laky's home and studio, in San Francisco, California.

Laky speaks of her recent exhibitions; leaving Hungary as a child; using words in art; learning languages; family influences in her art; the family art gallery and Chinese painting; changing majors in college; working with various materials; using recycled materials in her work; retirement; planning her works; working with assistants; working with a small community in Europe; construction of her works; using computers to create art; the craft "renaissance"; scale and outdoor projects; working with dealers and commissioned pieces; emphasis on negative space. Laky also recalls Emile Lahner, Mary Dumas, Ed Rossbach, Judy Foosaner, Peter Voulkos, Joanne Branford, Lillian Elliott, Henry Miller, Louise Nevelson, Darryl Dobras, Brett Christiansen, Kim Ocampo, Jack Lenor Larsen, Martin Puryear, Ann Hamilton, Suzi Gablik, Susan Sontag, and others.

Oral history interview with Helen Lundeberg, 1980 July 19-Aug. 29

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 82 p.

An interview of Helen Lundeberg conducted 1980 July 19-Aug. 29, by Jan Butterfield, for the Archives of American Art.

Lundeberg speaks of problems encountered by women artists; her youth and early interest in painting; her education; studying with Lawrence Murphy and Lorser Feitelson; painting murals for the WPA Federal Art Project; her series of small paintings; the California arts environment; her relationship with Feitelson and their influences on each other; and her working habits. She recalls the critic Jules Langsner.

Oral history interview with Fred and Edith Nagler, 1979 Dec. 14

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 26 p.

An interview of Fred and Edith Nagler conducted 1979 Dec. 14, by Lisa Laughlin, for the Archives of American Art Texas Project.

Oral history interview with Paul H. Nitze, 1996 Apr. 30

Archives of American Art
1 sound cassette (60 min.) : analog.

Transcript: 62 pages.

An interview with Paul H. Nitze conducted 1996 Apr. 30, by Liza Kirwin and Richard Wattenmaker, for the Archives of American Art's Oral History Program, at The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies of The Johns Hopkins University, in Washington, D.C.

Nitze mainly recalls his acquaintance with Alexander Calder and Isamu Noguchi. He discusses meeting Calder in Berlin, Germany at the opening of a Calder exhibition in 1929; how Calder moved to Nitze's Berlin pension and they "became pals" that first day; their plans to bicycle to Russia with other friends; sharing an apartment with Calder in New York City; a performance of the Circus there and how "everybody loved him"; and Calder's courtship and marriage to Louisa James. Nitze talks about meeting Noguchi through Sidney Spivak and how Noguchi made a bronze head of Nitze as re-payment for his support; and Noguchi's "instinct for making things acceptable to the modern art world." He also discusses his early desire to be an art dealer and pursuing that career in Paris until he realized that "the whole profession was a bunch of crooks"; his own art collection and how, at age 15, he bought two paintings by Austrian Hans Grüss, and later acquired works by Degas, Van Gogh, and Monet.

Oral History interview with Jim Nutt, 1979

Archives of American Art
Transcript 194 p.

An interview of Jim Nutt conducted 1979, by I. Michael Ranoff, for the Archives of American Art.

Oral history interview with Carl E. Pickhardt, 1974 Dec. 4-1975 Jan. 16

Archives of American Art
Transcript 135 p.

An interview of Carl E. Pickhardt conducted 1974 Dec.4-1975 Jan. 16, by Robert Brown, for the Archives of American Art.

Oral history interview with Ronald Alfred Slayton, 1984 August 22

Archives of American Art
4 sound files (2 hrs. 15 min.) : digital, wav file

Transcript: 42 pages

An interview of Ronald Alfred Slayton conducted 1984 August 22, by Robert F. Brown, for the Archives of American Art.

Slayton discusses his childhood education in Barre, Vermont and Hanover, N.H.; training at Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, N.Y.; involvement in government art projects and community betterment programs in Burlington, Vermont; setting up a community art program in Brandon, Vermont; developing hand-made crafts in Weston, Vermont; and destruction of most of his WPA paintings.

Oral history interview with Paul J. Smith, 2010 April 19-20

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 61 pages

An interview of Paul J. Smith conducted 2010 April 19 and 20, by Lloyd E. Herman, for the Archives of American Art's Nanette L. Laitman Documentation Project for Craft and Decorative Arts in America, at Smith's home, in New York, N.Y.

Smith recalls his childhood; attending the Art Institute of Buffalo; working in display at the Flint & Kent department store in Buffalo; his interest in "hobby crafts" and greater exploration of jewelry and wood; exhibiting; joining the staff of the American Craftsmen's Council; becoming director of the Museum of Contemporary Crafts; developing the museum's program and international focus; organizing the "Objects: USA" exhibition in 1969; developing the permanent collection of the Museum of Contemporary Crafts (in 1979 renamed the American Craft Museum); the 30th anniversary exhibition, "Craft Today: Poetry of the Physical," in 1986; becoming director emeritus; the "Craft Today USA" tour, 1989-1993; developing a consulting service; serving as guest curator; special projects; interest in photography; the current DIY movement as a continuum of the past.

Oral history interview with Richard Stankiewicz, 1963 February-August 20

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 373 pages.

An interview of Richard Stankiewicz conducted between 1963 February-August 20, by Richard Brown Baker, for the Archives of American Art.

Oral history interview with Tony Vevers, 1998 July 9-August 25

Archives of American Art
Sound recording: 2 sound cassettes (2 hr., 49 min.) : analog.

Transcript: 58 pages

Interview of Tony Vevers, conducted on August 25, 1998, by Robert F. Brown for the Archives of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, in Provincetown, Massachusetts.

Vevers speaks of being sent by his parents to the United States in 1940; secondary schooling in Madison, Connecticut and at the Hotchkiss School, Lakeville, Connecticut (1944); serving in the U.S. Army infantry in Europe, 1944-1946; attending Yale University on the GI Bill and graduating with a BA in painting and drawing, 1950; further art training in Florence, Italy and at the Hans Hofmann School, NYC (1950-1953); his marriage to Elspeth Halvorsen, fellow artist, 1953; his studies in Italy; the unexciting nature of contemporary Italian art; contemporary art in Paris, where Picasso impressed him but work of Hans Hartung and (Marie Elena) Vieira da Silva did not; studying with Hans Hofmann; working at the non-profit City Center Gallery, which was designed to give younger artists exposure through juried exhibitions; and living in poverty in NYC and Provincetown until 1963. Vevers also recalls Tom Blagden, Alfred Stieglitz, Deane Keller, Rudolph Zallinger, Claes Oldenburg, Stephen Pace, Lawrence Calcagno, Hans Hofmann, Milton Avery, Adolph Gottlieb, Jack Levine, Franz Kline, Louise Nevelson, Max Weber, Richard Lippold, and others.

Oral history interview with Otto Wittmann, 1981 October 25

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 42 pages

An interview of Otto Wittmann conducted 1981 October 25, by Thomas Carr Howe, for the Archives of American Art.

Oral history interview with Virginia Wright, 2017 March 22- 23

Archives of American Art
Transcript: 88 pages.

4 sound files (3 hrs., 13 min.) digital, wav

An oral history interview with Virginia Wright conducted 2017 March 22-23, by Mija Riedel, for the Archives of American Art and the Center for the History of Collecting in America at the Frick Art Reference Library of The Frick Collection, at Wright's home in Seattle, Washington.

Oral history interview with Claire Zeisler, 1981 June

Archives of American Art
Transcript 43 pages

An interview of Claire Zeisler conducted 1981 June, by Dennis Barrie, for the Archives of American Art.

Jazz (Program #18)

Smithsonian Center for Folklife and Cultural Heritage
This time, I thought we’d wander about the collection listening to a teeny bit of the Jazz that my father recorded. Given everything he did, it is easy to forget his keen interest in jazz and of his important recordings, such as for Jazz at the Philharmonic series. But rather than get caught up in the history of Jazz or the role that my father played or make an attempt at being exhaustive with the jazz recordings, I thought we would make things simple and just goose around the collection a bit. Smithsonian Folkways: Sounds to Grow On is a 26-part series hosted by Michael Asch that features the original recordings of Folkways Records.
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