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Smithsonian Latino Center

Smithsonian Staff

The Smithsonian Latino Center is the corazón of Latinidad at the Smithsonian. It works toward preserving Latino history and culture, engaging Latino communities, and advancing Latino representation in the United States. Since 1997, SLC has successfully ensured that the contributions of the Latino community are celebrated and represented throughout the Smithsonian.

The Center works collaboratively with Smithsonian museums and research centers, ensuring that the contributions of the Latino community in the arts, history, national culture and scientific achievement are explored, presented, celebrated and preserved. We support scholarly research, exhibitions, public and educational programs, web-based content and virtual platforms, and collections and archives. We also manage leadership and professional development programs for Latino youth, emerging scholars and museum professionals.

Smithsonian Latino Center's collections

 

Civil Intersections Resource Kit: The Farmworkers' Movement Case Study

<p><br><strong>Introduction: </strong>What is <em>Civil Intersections</em><strong>?</strong> </p> <p><em>Civil Intersections</em>: Asian-Latino Solidarity Movements and Cross-Cultural Dialogue is a new educator resource kit and capacity-building workshop developed by the Smithsonian’s Latino Center (SLC) and Asian Pacific American Center (APAC). Entering its pilot year (2021) with Cobb County School District in Georgia, <em>Civil Intersections</em> strives to serve as a multi-year effort in partnership with school districts across the United States. SLC and APAC educators are aiming to present US Latino and Asian American regional and national histories to middle and high school educators who are looking to weave first-voice Latino and Asian American narratives and primary source materials into their curriculum. For its pilot year, <em>Civil Intersections</em> centers its resource kit and workshop on the story of the Farmworkers’ Movement and the organizers behind it, Larry Itliong, Cesar Chavez, and Dolores Huerta. The story of the Farmworker’s Movement and the leaders behind it is an important story in American history because it secured better pay, established workers’ rights to organize, and created better working conditions on many farms. </p> <p>While this history took place in Delano, California, it has national resonance as many Latino and Asian migrants and immigrants are working on farms and other industries across the United States to make a living. According to the organization Farmworker Justice, an estimated 2.4 million farmworkers work on farms and ranches in the United States in 2015-2016—of this number, 49% of farmworkers were immigrants, and 75% of the workforce were foreign-born. Women make up 32% of the agricultural workforce, and there have been increasing numbers of new migrants arriving in the U.S. from indigenous communities in Mexico and Guatemala. According to the US Department of Agriculture, in 2017, a higher proportion of Asian producers in the US identified as female, and younger on average, showing there are many farmers are at the beginning of their careers. Asian producers account for 0.7% of the country’s 3.4 million food producers and are primarily located in California and Hawaiʻi. Woven into these numbers are historic and contemporary stories of migration, immigration, belonging, identity, and equity. The legacy and impact of the Farmworkers’ Movement can be seen today through better pay and working conditions—however, inequities that Latino and Asian workers face in farming, and other industries, persist today. The COVID-19 pandemic unraveled issues of race, belonging, workers’ rights and safety, access to healthcare, and equity. The impacts of the pandemic have disproportionately impacted Latinx farmworkers in the US, who are deemed essential workers unable to practice preventative measures, such as staying at home and working from home. As we reflect on the history of the Farmworkers Movement, how can we bridge the past to current events impacting communities today? What have learned, and not learned, from the Farmworkers’ Movement, and who are the leaders today fighting for equity and justice? How can the practice of civil discourse lead to change? </p> <p><em>Civil Intersections</em> aims to spark new conversations with educators and students </p> <p>We hope that this resource kit and methodology leads to new conversations between educators and students in the classroom, and that it sparks new ideas for bringing first-voice narratives into the classroom. We also hope that the story of the Farmworkers Movement inspires users to think about the humanity of Asian and Latino communities throughout the United States, not solely through a contributions lens, but through a lens of belonging, identity, and equity, with all of its triumphs and challenges. </p> <p>How do I use this resource kit? The Civil Intersections resource kit comes in two collections. The first collection, part one, dives into historical context of the Farmworkers Movement, and the second collection, part two, dives into the kit’s six-step methodology. As you use both collections, look for a yellow paperclip in the left-hand corner of the tiles. The paperclip indicates that there is more information in the tile--simply click on the tile to see what more information is included. Some tile annotations include discussion questions, or more information about the step or resource. There is a specific order for how to navigate each collection--start with the top left tile and move left to right, moving down row by row. </p> <p>Overall, the two collections include access to: </p> <ul><li>Primary source materials from the Smithsonian Institution and community organizations across the United States, </li><li>Multimedia, such as short videos, </li><li>Images of objects, photographs and other archival materials from the Smithsonian Institution and community organizations, </li><li>A six-step methodology that focuses on reflection, transferable skills, and more, </li><li>Discussion and reflection questions and worksheets that you can use with colleagues and students </li><li>Strategies for using and applying primary source materials into existing curricula, </li><li>Ways to send in your feedback to the project’s developers. </li></ul> <p>Civil Intersections is an ongoing project, edited and informed by educators like you. We welcome feedback on the design, framing, and usability of this methodology and resource kit at any time. </p> <p>If you would like to contact the organizers of this kit to discuss its content and approach, please email: </p> <ul><li>Emily Key (Director of Education, Smithsonian Latino Center) at <a href="mailto:KeyE@si.edu" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">KeyE@si.edu</a> </li><li>Andrea Kim Neighbors (Manager of Education Initiatives, Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center) at <a href="mailto:NeighborsA@si.edu" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">NeighborsA@si.edu</a> </li></ul> <p>With your feedback and insights, we will continue to develop and refine this methodology and accompanying resources based on your feedback. We aim to make Smithsonian and community-created resources usable and relevant for educators across the United States so that a fuller American story may be shared with students and future generations. </p> <p>This resource kit received federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center. </p> <p> </p>
Smithsonian Latino Center
51
 

Civil Intersections Resource Kit: The Methodology for Classroom Implementation

<p><strong>Introduction: </strong>What is <em>Civil Intersections</em><strong>?</strong></p> <p><em>Civil Intersections</em>: Asian-Latino Solidarity Movements and Cross-Cultural Dialogue is a new educator resource kit and capacity-building workshop developed by the Smithsonian’s Latino Center (SLC) and Asian Pacific American Center (APAC). Entering its pilot year (2021) with Cobb County School District in Georgia, <em>Civil Intersections</em> strives to serve as a multi-year effort in partnership with school districts across the United States. SLC and APAC educators are aiming to present US Latino and Asian American regional and national histories to middle and high school educators who are looking to weave first-voice Latino and Asian American narratives and primary source materials into their curriculum. For its pilot year, <em>Civil Intersections</em> centers its resource kit and workshop on the story of the Farmworkers’ Movement and the organizers behind it, Larry Itliong, Cesar Chavez, and Dolores Huerta. The story of the Farmworker’s Movement and the leaders behind it is an important story in American history because it secured better pay, established workers’ rights to organize, and created better working conditions on many farms.</p> <p>While this history took place in Delano, California, it has national resonance as many Latino and Asian migrants and immigrants are working on farms and other industries across the United States to make a living. According to the organization Farmworker Justice, an estimated 2.4 million farmworkers work on farms and ranches in the United States in 2015-2016—of this number, 49% of farmworkers were immigrants, and 75% of the workforce were foreign-born. Women make up 32% of the agricultural workforce, and there have been increasing numbers of new migrants arriving in the U.S. from indigenous communities in Mexico and Guatemala. According to the US Department of Agriculture, in 2017, a higher proportion of Asian producers in the US identified as female, and younger on average, showing there are many farmers are at the beginning of their careers. Asian producers account for 0.7% of the country’s 3.4 million food producers and are primarily located in California and Hawaiʻi. Woven into these numbers are historic and contemporary stories of migration, immigration, belonging, identity, and equity. The legacy and impact of the Farmworkers’ Movement can be seen today through better pay and working conditions—however, inequities that Latino and Asian workers face in farming, and other industries, persist today. The COVID-19 pandemic unraveled issues of race, belonging, workers’ rights and safety, access to healthcare, and equity. The impacts of the pandemic have disproportionately impacted Latinx farmworkers in the US, who are deemed essential workers unable to practice preventative measures, such as staying at home and working from home. As we reflect on the history of the Farmworkers Movement, how can we bridge the past to current events impacting communities today? What have learned, and not learned, from the Farmworkers’ Movement, and who are the leaders today fighting for equity and justice? How can the practice of civil discourse lead to change?</p> <p><em>Civil Intersections</em> aims to spark new conversations with educators and students</p> <p>We hope that this resource kit and methodology leads to new conversations between educators and students in the classroom, and that it sparks new ideas for bringing first-voice narratives into the classroom. We also hope that the story of the Farmworkers Movement inspires users to think about the humanity of Asian and Latino communities throughout the United States, not solely through a contributions lens, but through a lens of belonging, identity, and equity, with all of its triumphs and challenges.</p> <p>How do I use this resource kit? The Civil Intersections resource kit comes in two collections. The first collection, part one, dives into historical context of the Farmworkers Movement, and the second collection, part two, dives into the kit’s six-step methodology. As you use both collections, look for a yellow paperclip in the left-hand corner of the tiles. The paperclip indicates that there is more information in the tile--simply click on the tile to see what more information is included.  Some tile annotations include discussion questions, or more information about the step or resource. There is a specific order for how to navigate each collection--start with the top left tile and move left to right, moving down row by row. </p> <p>Overall, the two collections include access to:</p> <ul><li>Primary source materials from the Smithsonian Institution and community organizations across the United States,</li><li>Multimedia, such as short videos,</li><li>Images of objects, photographs and other archival materials from the Smithsonian Institution and community organizations,</li><li>A six-step methodology that focuses on reflection, transferable skills, and more,</li><li>Discussion and reflection questions and worksheets that you can use with colleagues and students</li><li>Strategies for using and applying primary source materials into existing curricula,</li><li>Ways to send in your feedback to the project’s developers.</li></ul> <p>Civil Intersections is an ongoing project, edited and informed by educators like you. We welcome feedback on the design, framing, and usability of this methodology and resource kit at any time.</p> <p>If you would like to contact the organizers of this kit to discuss its content and approach, please email:</p> <ul><li>Emily Key (Director of Education, Smithsonian Latino Center) at <a href="mailto:KeyE@si.edu" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">KeyE@si.edu</a></li><li>Andrea Kim Neighbors (Manager of Education Initiatives, Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center) at <a href="mailto:NeighborsA@si.edu" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">NeighborsA@si.edu</a></li></ul> <p>With your feedback and insights, we will continue to develop and refine this methodology and accompanying resources based on your feedback. We aim to make Smithsonian and community-created resources usable and relevant for educators across the United States so that a fuller American story may be shared with students and future generations.</p> <p>This resource kit received federal support from the Latino Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Latino Center.</p>
Smithsonian Latino Center
42
 

Latinas Talk Latinas: Selena, Crossing Over Cultural Boundaries

<p>This Learning Lab is designed to accompany the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History and the Smithsonian's Latino Center's video <em>Latinas Talk Latinas: Selena, Crossing Over Cultural Boundaries. </em>This resource is meant to be experienced chronologically, starting with the second title. Learn more about the Smithsonian collections and additional resources on Selena. The goal is for users to 1) learn who Selena was  2) explore the assets on Selena across the Smithsonian Institution, and 3) understand why Selena is so important to Mexican-American women -- and the Latino community at large. </p> <p>Selena Quintanilla was a pioneering performer who started as a young girl within the Tejano music scene and eventually moved into several genres of Spanish-language music and crossed over into mainstream English-language music in the United States. This Learning Lab explores her legacy, across the United States and through the Smithsonian collections</p> <p>A note on the flowery aesthetic of the Lab: flowers hold a special significance for Selena and her fans. The Quintanilla family requested that everyone carry a single white rose to Selena's funeral because it was Selena's favorite flower. The flowers in the titles are also a nod to one of Selena y Los Dinos' greatest hits, "Como la Flor."</p>
Smithsonian Latino Center
31
 

Art for Social Change: Conversations on Protest and Economic Injustice

<p></p> <p>A protest is a way for people to share their beliefs about a person, place, thing, or idea. People can share those beliefs through a statement or action. Public marches and rallies are examples of protests. Writing letters, singing songs, not eating, or using violence are other types of protest. Others have used their clothing and hair styles as a type of protest. Protests are usually planned by a coalition of community members who have a vision for social change. Protests usually take place in public spaces where they can be seen.</p> <p>The U.S. Constitution’s First Amendment guarantees people the right to protest peacefully. Acts of violence and the destruction of property are against the law in any protest. Sometimes, people protest economic injustices. These protests, also called demonstrations, have demanded different things. They include government programs to help with of job training or small business loans. It also includes demands for safer working conditions, higher wages, and better education.</p> <p>Often times, these protests are organized by people called activists. Activists work towards a social change. This can be something political or social. They work together and form organizations. They fight for equity and against injustices of all kinds.</p> <p>Together, we will look two events where activists and organizations created change for their communities. They organized African-Americans and Latinas/os/xs and others too. All to protest economic injustice. The events featured are:</p> <ol><li>Poor People’s Campaign, 1968</li><li>Farmworker's Movement: Delano Grape Strike, 1965-1970</li></ol> <p>This Learning Lab features art, videos, photographs, and protest signs. It also has thinking routines from the Harvard Graduate School of Education's Project Zero. They will help create conversations around the pictures or protest banners found in this collection. Worksheets from the Smithsonian Latino Center's <em>Cultural Expressions: Art for Social Change</em> can be found at the end of this collection. They are available for elementary, middle school, and high school students. Caregivers or teachers can use the questions found within the activities to create responsive social change protest signs and art. </p> <p></p>
Smithsonian Latino Center
149
 

Diosa Costello, Latinas Talk Latinas

<p style="text-align: center;">This resource is designed to accompany the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History's and the Smithsonian's Latino Center's video <em>Latinas Talk Latinas:  Diosa Costello, <strong>Latina Broadway Star</strong>.</em> After watching the video, which is located in the second tile of this collection, please return to this page to learn more about the assets we have in our digital collection as well as additional resources that will help you further explore the topics and themes presented in the video.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Diosa</em> Costello was a pioneering <em>Latina Broadway performer</em><em>, building a decades long career with her talent in </em><em>music, dance, and acting. She </em><em>starred in movies such as Too Many Girls! and the legendary Broadway show South Pacific.</em> Her foundational story paves the way for many of our beloved Latinas actress and musicians of today! </p>
Smithsonian Latino Center
19
 

Latinas Talk Latinas, Ellen Ochoa

<p style="text-align: center;">This resource is designed to accompany the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History's and the Smithsonian's Latino Center's video <em>Latinas Talk Latinas, Ellen Ochoa: Beyond the Barrier.</em> After watching the video, which is located in the second tile of this collection, please return to this page to learn more about the assets we have in our digital collection as well as additional resources that will help you further explore the topics and themes presented in the video.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Ellen Ochoa was the first Latina astronaut</em> in space and <em>first Latina, only the second woman, </em><em>to serve as the Director of the</em> <em>Johnson Space Center</em><em>, responsible</em> <em>for</em> all astro<em>naut activities for NASA. Find out how this daring and tenacious Latina </em><em>went beyond the barrier and set new heights for young girls to reach for the stars. </em> </p>
Smithsonian Latino Center
21
 

Clotilde Arias, Latinas Talk Latinas

<p>This resource is designed to accompany the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History's and the Smithsonian's Latino Center's video <em>Latinas Talk Latinas, Clotilde Arias: The Impact of a Peruvian Immigrant.</em> After watching the video, which is located in the second tile of this collection, please return to this page to learn more about the assets we have in our digital collection as well as additional resources that will help you further explore the topics and themes presented in the video.</p> <p>Clotilde Arias's story reminds us of the resilience and creativity of many Latina immigrants. She succeeded in a male-dominated world in New York in the '40s and '50s. Her best-known act of patriotism was creating a singable Spanish-language version of the Star-Spangled Banner.</p>
Smithsonian Latino Center
20
 

Marge Villa, Latinas Talk Latinas

<p>This resource is designed to accompany the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History's and the Smithsonian's Latino Center's video <em>Latinas Talk Latinas, Marge Villa: Breaking Gender Barriers.</em> After watching the video, which is located in the second tile of this collection, please return to this page to learn more about the assets we have in our digital collection as well as additional resources that will help you further explore the topics and themes presented in the video.</p> <p>Margaret (Marge) Villa was among the very few women professional baseball players and a record-setting catcher. Villa broke gender barriers in the early '40s at age 16 while playing in East Los Angeles, California.</p>
Smithsonian Latino Center
23
 

Sylvia Rivera, Latinas on Latinas

<p>This resource is designed to accompany the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History's and the Smithsonian's Latino Center's video <em>Latinas Talk Latinas, Sylvia Rivera: Pushing Boundaries.</em> After watching the video, which is located in the second tile of this collection, please return to this page to learn more about the assets we have in our digital collection as well as additional resources that will help you further explore the topics and themes presented in the video.</p> <p>Sylvia Rivera was a transgender woman living in New York City during the '60s and '70s. She became a fierce defender of LGBTQ+ rights, pushing the movement in the aftermath of the Stonewall riots to vigilantly protect transgender people's rights.</p>
Smithsonian Latino Center
25
 

Art for Social Change: Conversations on Protest and Police Brutality

<p>A protest is a way for people to share their beliefs about a person, place, thing, or idea. People can share those beliefs through a statement or action. Public marches and rallies are examples of protests. Writing letters, singing songs, not eating, or using violence are other types of protest. </p> <p></p> <p>The United States guarantees people the right to protest peacefully. It does so through the Constitution and the first amendment. Sometimes, stress between protesters and police can turn violent. There have been times when police have been violent toward communities of color. This form of abuse is known as police brutality. </p> <p>Together, we will look at points of collaboration and solidarity between African Americans and Latinos. We will examine tensions between these groups and how they came to work together. We will also look at the conflicts between them and the police. The events featured are:</p> <ol><li>The National Chicano Moratorium, 1970</li><li>Mt. Pleasant Riots of Washington, DC., 1991</li><li>#BlackLivesMatter, 2013 to today</li></ol> <p></p> <p>This Learning Lab features art, videos, photographs, and protest signs. It also has thinking routines from the Harvard Graduate School of Education's Project Zero. They will help create conversations around the pictures or protest banners found in this collection. Worksheets from the Smithsonian Latino Center's <em>Cultural Expressions: Art for Social Change</em> can be found at the end of this collection. They are available for elementary, middle school, and high school students. Caregivers or teachers can use the questions found within the activities to create responsive social change protest signs and art. </p> <p></p>
Smithsonian Latino Center
70
 

Making History, Sharing Culture Featuring Disney-Pixar's Coco

<p>This collection can serve students grades 2-5 as well middle school and high school students interested in Latino culture or as part of a Spanish project exploring family traditions. Activities include family or classroom activity on collage making with family photos and writing your own museum object label. Videos include a special performance from Grupo Bella and interviews with artists, chefs, curators, and educators that formed part of the<em> Making History, Sharing Culture Featuring Disney-Pixar's "Coco" </em>Event. An on-stage conversation featuring Illustrator Ana Ramirez and Character Modeling Artist Alonso Martinez of Disney-Pixar's "Coco" is also featured.<br></p> <p><em><br></em></p><p><em>Making History, Sharing Culture featuring Disney-Pixar's "Coco</em><em>" </em>was presented as the Smithsonian's feature Hispanic Heritage event by the Smithsonian Latino Center and the National Museum of American History in October 2018. A portion of the travel of the Smithsonian Latino Center and this program was generously provided by Southwest Airlines. Additional support was provided by The Walt Disney Company.</p>
Smithsonian Latino Center
10
 

Panamanian Passages | Pasajes Panameños

<p>This collection highlights the science, geography, cultural contributions, including those of native peoples of Panama, and the 20th century history of Panama. This includes the science and geography of the Isthmus, the Panama Canal, the U.S. in Panama and US expansionism and cross-cultural exchange. It will give students an opportunity to learn an overview of U.S. history in Latin America and Panamanian contributions to world history.  The collection includes bilingual (English and Spanish) activities for middle school and high school students including a scavenger hunt like worksheet and discussion questions for group conversations or individual essay statements that focus on historical inquiry-based learning. </p> <p>Esta colección bilingüe resalta la ciencia, la geografía y las contribuciones culturales, incluyendo las de comunidades indígenas y las de la historia del siglo 20, de Panamá. La colección incluye la ciencia y la geografía del istmo, el Canal de Panamá, el expansionismo estadounidense y los intercambios culturales entre ambos. Les dará a los estudiantes una oportunidad de aprender un resumen de la historia estadounidense en Latinoamérica y las contribuciones panameñas a la historia mundial. La colección incluye actividades bilingües para estudiantes de secundaria y preparatoria incluyendo una hoja de ejercicios con un juego de tesoro y preguntas de discusión en grupo. También incluye preguntas para ensayos.</p> <p><br /></p>
Smithsonian Latino Center
6