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Freer and Sackler Galleries

The Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery
Smithsonian Staff

The Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Asian Art, are located on the National Mall in Washington, DC. Committed to preserving, exhibiting, and interpreting exemplary works of art, the Freer and Sackler house exceptional collections of Asian art, with more than 42,000 objects dating from the Neolithic period to today. Renowned and iconic objects originate from China, Japan, Korea, South and Southeast Asia, the ancient Near East, and the Islamic world. The Freer Gallery also holds a significant group of American works of art largely dating to the late nineteenth century. It boasts the world’s largest collection of diverse works by James McNeill Whistler, including the famed Peacock Room.  View the Freer and Sackler website and learn more about their education programs.

Freer and Sackler Galleries's collections

 

Investigating the Layers of a Korean Buddhist Sculpture

<p>This Learning Lab Collection focuses on a single Buddhist object from the National Museum of Korea.  Students will formulate questions about this work of art using Project Zero's<em> Layers </em>Visible Thinking Routine.  They will investigate answers to their questions by researching the exhibition website and engaging with videos, virtual tours, and other digital resources provided.  <br /></p> <p>#AsiaTeachers<br />Tags:  Art; Buddhism; Korea; Project Zero; research; National Museum of Korea<br /></p> <p><br /></p> <p>About the exhibition:</p> <p>Sacred Dedication:  A Korean Buddhist Masterpiece<br />September 21, 2019–March 22, 2020<br />Arthur M. Sackler Gallery</p> <p>A single object—a beautiful gilt wood sculpture of Gwaneum, the bodhisattva of compassion and the most popular deity in Korean Buddhism—is the focus of this loan exhibition from the National Museum of Korea. Carved in the late Goryeo period (918–1392), this crowned image is now known to be the oldest surviving gilded wood figure in an informal pose. Its posture, with one leg raised and the other lowered, is associated with the deity’s dwelling place, where he sits calmly on rocks above the crashing waves of the sea. The same subject in a similar pose was common in devotional paintings, such as the hanging scroll of <a href="https://freersackler.mystagingwebsite.com/object/F1904.13/">Suwol Gwaneum bosal</a> (Water-Moon Avalokiteshvara) now in the collection of the Freer Gallery.</p> <p>Sacred texts and potent symbolic objects were sealed inside this hollow religious sculpture when it was first placed into worship in the thirteenth century. The practice of adding dedication material to a Buddhist sculpture during consecration ceremonies was believed to transform it into a living body. Recent research conducted by the National Museum of Korea provides new information about this rare sculpture, its hidden contents, and the special rituals that surrounded image consecration in Korea centuries ago.</p> <p>We thank our colleagues at the National Museum of Korea for sharing their research and facilitating this exhibition.</p>
Freer and Sackler Galleries
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Introducing Hokusai: Mad about Painting

<p>This Learning Lab Collection introduces three themes from the <em>Hokusai:  Mad about Painting</em> exhibition and provides works of art, classroom activities, and discussion questions associated with each theme. </p> <p>Tags:  #AsiaTeachers; Be a Reporter; customs; daily life; dragons; Edo; Great Wave; Hokusai; Japan; nature; New Year; personification; poetry; power; Project Zero; Mount Fuji; See Think Wonder; Step Inside; symbols; thunder; woodblock print</p> <p>About the exhibition:</p> <p>Hokusai:  Mad about Painting<br />November 23, 2019–November 8, 2020<br />Freer Gallery of Art, galleries 5–8</p> <p><strong><strong>The Japanese artist Katsushika Hokusai (1760–1849) is widely recognized for a single image—Great Wave Off the Coast of Kanagawa, an icon of global art—yet he produced thousands of works throughout his long life. Charles Lang Freer recognized the artist’s vast abilities before many other collectors, and he assembled the world’s largest collection of paintings, sketches, and drawings by Hokusai. In commemoration of the centennial of Freer’s death in 1919, and in celebration of the Summer Olympics in Tokyo in 2020, the Freer Gallery presents a yearlong exploration of the prolific career of Katsushika Hokusai. Works large and small are on view, from six-panel folding screens and hanging scrolls to paintings and drawings. Also included are rare hanshita-e, drawings for woodblock prints that were adhered to the wood and frequently destroyed in the process of carving the block prior to printing. Among the many featured works are Hokusai’s manga, his often-humorous renderings of everyday life in Japan. Together, these works reveal an artistic genius who thought he might finally achieve true mastery in painting—if he lived to the age of 110.</strong></strong><br /></p> <p><br /></p>
Freer and Sackler Galleries
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An Introduction to Japanese Painting

<p><u></u>This collection was designed by the Education Department of the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery as a basic introduction to Japanese painting for educators. It is a collection of artworks from the museum's permanent collection that draw from a wide variety of formats, styles, media, and subjects that represent many of the major trends in Japanese painting. Each image includes key information about the artwork, as well as ideas for class discussion, lesson components, and/or links to resources such as videos and articles which provide additional information about the artwork. Feel free to copy the collection and adapt it to your own use. </p> <p>Keywords: Buddha, Hokusai, Mount Fuji, watercolor, bodhisattva, Fugen, Sōtatsu, cherry blossoms, seasons, Genji, crane, <em>emaki</em>, <em>byobu</em>, <em>kakemono, ukiyo-e</em>, map, teacher, student, autumn, Japan, Japanese art, landscape, Edo period, Buddhism, Heian period, water, ocean, wave, boat, flower, insect, Muromachi period, river, <em>surimono</em></p> <p><u></u><br /></p> <p><br /></p>
Freer and Sackler Galleries
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Compare and Contrast: Personal Perspectives in Portraiture

<p>In this activity, students will explore how portraits reflect both the personality of the subject portrayed and the artist's personal view of the subject. They will examine two portraits, both painted by American artist James McNeill Whistler (1834-1903), of his patron British shipping magnate Frederick Richards Leyland (1831-1892). Using looking strategies, students will compare and contrast the artist's perspective of his subject, then will connect the portraits to music as a final activity.</p> <p>This collection was created for the District of Columbia Public Schools (DCPS) Arts Professional Development Day by the Education Department at the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, in collaboration with Tess Porter, Smithsonian Center for Learning and Digital Access.</p> <p>Tags: Peacock Room, Whistler, portrait</p>
Freer and Sackler Galleries
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Educating for Global Competence with Contemporary Asian Art

<p>What is global competence?  What are the skills and dispositions of globally competent students?  What role can art play in educating students for global competence?  Teachers can use this Learning Lab Collection as a resource for students to explore themes of global importance in the arts of Asia.  The Collection features two works of contemporary Asian art at the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery with several tools for students to examine and reflect about the works of art, such as Visible Thinking Routines,  Artful Thinking Routines, or Global Thinking Routines.  For each routine, the rationale and  process is described to help the teacher practice.  The Collection also includes artist interviews and other contextual information about the works of art for teachers and students to deepen their understanding.</p> <p>This Learning Lab Collection was created to support the The Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) National Teachers of the Year 2018 program.  CCSSO is a nonpartisan, nationwide, nonprofit organization of public officials who head departments of elementary and secondary education in the states, the District of Columbia, the Department of Defense Education Activity, the Bureau of Indian Education and the five U.S. extra-state jurisdictions.  Learn more at <a href="https://www.ccsso.org/">https://www.ccsso.org/</a></p> <p>Essential Questions to be addressed by this Learning Lab Collection:</p> <ul><li>What are some practical tools teachers can use to look closely and reflect about works of art?</li><li>How can we use works of art to prepare students to understand the world and participate in it?</li><li>How do we define <em>global competence</em> and <em>globally competent students</em>?</li></ul><p>#NTOY18<br /></p> <p>Tags:  #AsiaTeachers; Asian; Asia; Freer|Sackler; Project Zero; Global Competence; Global Competency; Visible Thinking; Artful Thinking; Chalk Talk; See-Think-Wonder; 3Ys; 3-2-1 Bridge; Contemporary Asian Art; China; India; Monkeys; Religion; Architecture; Chinese Cultural Revolution; Xu Bing; Terminal; Subodh Gupta; Sculpture; Lacquer; Wood; Brass <br /></p>
Freer and Sackler Galleries
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AP Art History Curriculum Framework: Focus on "Jahangir Preferring a Sufi Shaikh to Kings"

<p><em></em>This educational resource is designed especially for teachers and students in Advanced Placement (AP) Art History courses. It focuses on an artwork from the Freer|Sackler collection, <em>Jahangir Preferring a Sufi Shaikh to King</em><em>s;</em> one of the 250 works that are featured in the AP Art History curriculum. In particular, this artwork is in Content Area 8 - South, East, and Southeast Asia.</p><p>The AP Art History curriculum stresses the investigation of four key areas for each artwork: Form, Function, Content, and Context. This resource will touch on all four areas and can be adapted for use. </p><p><br /></p><p><br /></p><p>Tags: Album, AP, Art History, emperor, India, Jahangir, manuscript, Mughal dynasty, Muslim, portrait, Project Zero, See/Think/Wonder</p><p><br /></p><p><u>Background Note to Teachers</u></p><p>India's Mughal emperors, who reigned over a vast and wealthy empire that extended over most of the South Asian subcontinent between the 16th and 19th centuries, were passionate about lavish manuscripts and paintings. Between 1556 and 1657, the greatest Mughal patrons—the emperors Akbar, Jahangir and Shah Jahan—formed grand workshops that brought together and nurtured India's leading painters, calligraphers and illuminators. This resource focuses on just one of the paintings created for Jahangir, but the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery form one of the world's most important repositories of Mughal and Persian painting. To search our collection, refer to <a href="http://www.asia.si.edu/collections/edan/default.cfm">http://www.asia.si.edu/collections/edan/default.cf...</a>. </p><p><br /></p><p><u>Related Standards</u></p><ul><li>C3 D2.His.1.6-8 - Analyze connections among events and developments in broader historical contexts.</li><li>C3 D2.His.2.6-8 - Classify series of historical events and developments as examples of change and/or continuity.</li><li>C3 D2.His.14.6-8 - Explain multiple causes and effects of events and developments in the past.</li><li>C3 D2.His.15.6-8 - Evaluate the relative influence of various causes of events and developments in the past.</li><li>CCSS.ELA-Literacy.CCRA.R.7 - Integrate and evaluate content presented in diverse media and formats, including visually and quantitatively, as well as in words.</li><li>NAEA | Anchor Standard 7 - Perceive and analyze artistic work.</li><li>NAEA | Anchor Standard 8 - Interpret intent and meaning in artistic work.</li><li>NAEA | Anchor Standard 11 - Relate artistic ideas and works with societal, cultural and historical context to deepen understanding.</li><li>NCHS WH Era 6 | Standard 1B - The student understands the encounters between Europeans and peoples of Sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, and the Americas in the late 15th and early 16th centuries.</li><li>NCHS WH Era 6 | Standard 3C - The student understands the rise of the Safavid and Mughal empires.</li><li>NCHS WH Era 6 | Standard 6A - The student understands major global trends from 1450 to 1770.</li><li>NCSS 1 : Culture - Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of culture and cultural diversity.</li><li>NCSS 2 : Time, Continuity, and Change - Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of the past and its legacy.</li><li>NCSS 3 : People, Places, and Environments - Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of people, places, and environments.</li></ul><p><u><br /></u></p><p><u>Resources</u></p><p>This collection has been compiled from materials available on the Freer|Sackler website. In addition, these resources have been especially useful:</p><p>Milo Cleveland Beach, <em>The Imperial Image: Paintings for the Mughal Court</em>. Washington, DC: Smithsonian Institution, 2012.</p><p>Print and online materials related to "Worlds within Worlds: Imperial Paintings from India and Iran," an exhibition held at the Freer|Sackler from July 28 through Sept. 16, 2012. <br /></p><p><br /></p>
Freer and Sackler Galleries
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