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Ashley Naranjo

Manager of Educator Engagement and Strategic Partnerships
Smithsonian Institution
Smithsonian Staff
Manager of Educator Engagement and Strategic Partnerships

Ashley Naranjo, M.Ed. is a museum educator, specializing in the use of digital resources for teaching and learning. She currently manages distance learning initiatives and education partnerships for the Smithsonian. She has developed and implemented professional development opportunities for teachers, librarians and fellow museum educators since 2011. Before coming to the Smithsonian, she has had experiences in education in both formal and informal learning spaces: as an ESOL instructor for adults, a middle school teacher in the humanities and a summer programs administrator. She holds a B.A. in Human Development (Developmental Psychology) from the Lynch School of Education at Boston College, where she was a research assistant and independent study student in the Laboratory of Thinking, Learning & Cognition in the Arts. She completed a M.Ed. in Learning Design and Technology from the Rossier School of Education at the University of Southern California, with a thesis entitled, “Using Digital Museum Resources in the Classroom”. She is a 2019 graduate of the Getty Leadership Institute’s NextGen of Museum Leaders program.

Email: learning@si.edu | Twitter: https://twitter.com/SmithsonianEdu

Ashley Naranjo's collections

 

Aral Sea: Exploring Change Over Time with Satellite Imagery

This teaching collection includes maps and satellite images, complemented by image interpretation guides and related magazine articles, for students to discover what natural causes and human impacts have had consequences for the Aral Sea. The Aral Sea has been a continuously shrinking body of water over the last 50 years after the rivers that fed into it were diverted by irrigation projects. Learn what you can discover by annotating change through satellite imagery.
Ashley Naranjo
17
 

Investigating a Place: Texas, a U.S. State Collection

This state collection utilizes stamps, artworks, photographs, and videos in the Smithsonian's collection to highlight 65 iconic people, places, events and symbols of Texas' history and culture. Students might explore one resource in depth, or conduct a comparison of multiple resources. Follow-up questions might include: What sub-themes can you identify within this collection? What do these resources as a collection tell you about Texas? What marks someone as a "Texan"--is it birthplace alone? What other resources would you want to include to tell a more complete story of Texas history and culture?
Ashley Naranjo
64
 

Water-Related Hazards: Hurricanes

This topical collection includes resources about water-related hazards and natural disasters, namely hurricanes. Includes examples from around the world and over time, including Hurricane Ike in Texas and the Greater Antilles, Hurricane Katrina in the Gulf Coast, and Hurricane Sandy in the Northeastern region of the United States. Finally, a lesson plan asking students to design a post-hurricane revitalization plan is included.
Ashley Naranjo
11
 

Statue of Liberty and Symbolism

<p>This collection includes a variety of representations of the Statue of Liberty--as a protest object, on an environmental campaign poster, on a postage stamp, and as a symbol used on patterned clothing. In small groups, learners will apply three scaffolded Visible Thinking Routines to a resource of their choice. First, they will use a "See, Think, Wonder" thinking routine to note their observations and interpretations as well as anything about which they are curious. Next, they will analyze the resource using the "Layers" thinking routine. As an optional step, they could also consider the artist or creator of the object's point of view/perspective in creating the resource, with the "Step Inside" thinking routine. Finally, they will create an artwork or representation that depicts a cause that is important to a community of which they are a member.</p> <p>A final item from the American Jewish Historical Society includes information on a student contest running from September 2019 until May 2020, where students create a new poem based on Emma Lazarus' s"New Colossus" on the Statue of Liberty.</p> <p>#visiblethinking</p>
Ashley Naranjo
27
 

Women's Roles During the Civil War

Learning resource collection, in which students identify women's homefront and battlefront roles during the American Civil War, as depicted in Harper's Weekly and a short video from the Smithsonian Channel.
Ashley Naranjo
11
 

Conducting an Oral History: Tips from Across the Smithsonian

<p><strong>Oral history</strong> is a technique for generating and preserving original, historically interesting information – primary source material – from personal recollections through planned recorded interviews. This collection includes tips for conducting your own oral history from a student journalist and a historian, guides with suggestions for setting up your own interview, and recorded oral histories from key moments documenting a range of events in 20th century history. </p> <p>Recommended questions to consider with this collection of resources: <em>What is the purpose and value of oral histories in relation to understanding historic events?  </em><em>How do oral histories compare to other sources of information? </em><em>How can what we learn in school help us understand and process the experience of today, in the context of history? </em><em>What is our responsibility to document, reflect, and advocate? </em></p>
Ashley Naranjo
15
 

My Smithsonian Closet

<p>This collection serves as an example of how you might create your own grouping of objects and visuals that inspire your own fashion choices, while also practicing research skills in mind mapping to improve your online search results.</p><p>Consider the following questions:</p><ul><li>What Smithsonian objects would you put in your closet? </li><li>What surrounds your closet? </li><li>What inspires your closet?</li></ul> <ol><li>Learn more about this #SmithsonianEdu Challenge prompt by reading this blog post, featuring collections created by three previous Cooper Hewitt National Design Award winners <a href="https://s.si.edu/EduChallengeCloset">https://s.si.edu/EduChallengeCloset</a></li><li>Try it out for yourself. How might mind mapping search terms provide unique search results and serendipitous finds for your own collection response? How can these objects inspire creativity? How can these visuals help tell a story? </li><li>Add <a href="https://learninglab.si.edu/search/?f%5B_types%5D%5B%5D=ll_collection&st=%23mysmithsoniancloset&s=updated_at_desc&page=1">#MySmithsonianCloset</a> to your collection description and it will be added to a growing list of collections in response to this prompt. </li></ol>
Ashley Naranjo
36