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Ashley Naranjo

Manager of Educator Engagement and Strategic Partnerships
Smithsonian Institution
Smithsonian Staff
Manager of Educator Engagement and Strategic Partnerships

Ashley Naranjo, M.Ed. is a museum educator, specializing in the use of digital resources for teaching and learning. She currently manages distance learning initiatives and education partnerships for the Smithsonian. She has developed and implemented professional development opportunities for teachers, librarians and fellow museum educators since 2011. Before coming to the Smithsonian, she has had experiences in education in both formal and informal learning spaces: as an ESOL instructor for adults, a middle school teacher in the humanities and a summer programs administrator. She holds a B.A. in Human Development (Developmental Psychology) from the Lynch School of Education at Boston College, where she was a research assistant and independent study student in the Laboratory of Thinking, Learning & Cognition in the Arts. She completed a M.Ed. in Learning Design and Technology from the Rossier School of Education at the University of Southern California, with a thesis entitled, “Using Digital Museum Resources in the Classroom”. She is a 2019 graduate of the Getty Leadership Institute’s NextGen of Museum Leaders program.

Email: learning@si.edu | Twitter: https://twitter.com/SmithsonianEdu

Ashley Naranjo's collections

 

Photograph Analysis: "Moon Man" Image of Buzz Aldrin

<p>This topical collection includes the iconic "Moon Man" image of astronaut Buzz Aldrin, a National Air and Space Museum “expert annotation” video featuring a curator highlighting specific details, and other resources about the space suit and the Apollo 11 mission. </p> <p>Teachers and students may use this collection as a springboard for classroom discussions about the mission to the moon, for analysis of photographic details, or in biography projects about the astronauts.  <br /></p>
Ashley Naranjo
11
 

Pocahontas: Comparing and Contrasting Portrayals

<p>In this collection, we explore various portrayals of Pocahontas over 400 years. Students can compare and contrast two or more artistic renderings of Pocahontas, using the provided strategies and historical context with guidance from the teacher. By using portraits of the same sitter by different artists, students consider historical accuracy and changing cultural and historical perspectives. <br /></p> <p>This collection was adapted from National Portrait Gallery educator, Briana White's collection, "<a href="https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/compare-and-contrast-looking-strategy-learning-to-look-with-the-national-portrait-gallery/6y56a5fBegm4Ttor#r" target="_blank">Compare and Contrast Looking Strategy: Learning to Look with the National Portrait Gallery</a> " and supplemented with the National Museum of the American Indian's<em> <a href="https://nmai.si.edu/americans/#stories/queen-of-america" target="_blank">Americans</a></em> online exhibition. Sources for the approach include Compare and Contrast, the National Portrait Gallery's Reading Portraiture Guide and Project Zero's Artful Thinking Routines. </p> <p>#historicalthinking</p> <p><br /></p>
Ashley Naranjo
21
 

Portrait Analysis: Norman Mineta

<p>In this activity, students will analyze a portrait of Norman Mineta (b. 1931), a U.S. politician and the first Asian American to hold a post in the presidential cabinet, serving as Secretary of Transportation and Secretary of Commerce under President George W. Bush. The son of Japanese immigrants, Mineta and his family were incarcerated in the Heart Mountain camp in Wyoming under Executive Order 9066 during World War II. </p> <p>This activity can be used to build students vocabulary in discussing visual elements of a portrait or as an entry point for studying Norman Mineta's life and achievements, U.S. history, and more.  Questions from the National Portrait Gallery's<em> "Reading" Portraiture Guide for Educators</em> and a Project Zero See-Think-Wonder routine guide the student inquiry.  The complete guide and instructions are located at the end of the collection. To learn more about other Asian Pacific American activists and leaders, visit this collection: <a href="https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/asian-pacific-american-activists-and-leaders/MR1jszd7YDA7gujx#r" target="_blank">https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/asian-pacific-american-activists-and-leaders/MR1jszd7YDA7gujx#r</a></p> <p><em>This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.</em><span></span> </p> <p>Keywords:  internment; Japanese American; Nisei; San Jose, California </p> <p>#APA2018 #EthnicStudies<br /></p>
Ashley Naranjo
10
 

Presidential Portraiture: Looking and Analyzing Questions

A topical collection of United States presidential portraits. This collection might be best shortened to introduce a specific historical era and the leader(s) of the time, or adapted to show how American leaders wanted to be perceived during their tenure and legacy and how artists depicted them. It includes the National Portrait Gallery's "Reading" Portraiture at a Glance sheet, which offers suggested looking and analyzing questions. It is also includes associated curator and educator talks on the portraits of the presidents, where possible.
Ashley Naranjo
55
 

Proud Publisher: Heritage Bookmaking Activity

The Smithsonian has joined with book artist Sushmita Mazumdar to create a series of easy-to-do book projects designed to get families talking and creating together. In the "Today I am Here" storybook, students explore their heritage by identifying a person, place, and object to tell the story of their own personal history. Included here is a video demonstration and accompanying downloadable instructions to make your own “Today I am Here” storybook!
Ashley Naranjo
13
 

Righting a Wrong: Japanese Americans and World War II

<p>On February 19, 1942, Executive Order 9066 (#EO9066) was signed by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt, resulting in the imprisonment of Japanese Americans &amp; Japanese nationals in prison camps across the United States. In this short film, "Righting a Wrong", students can learn more about this history as they hear from a museum expert, who provides a behind-the-scenes look at personal objects from Japanese American youth who had lived in incarceration camps during World War II.  <a href="https://t.co/12ryShd7ap" dir="ltr" class="twitter-timeline-link" target="_blank" title="http://ow.ly/xbew30nD8tu"><span class="tco-ellipsis"></span><span class="invisible">http://</span></a></p> <p>The artifacts include a boy scout uniform that honors the 100th infantry battalion of Nisei soldiers, a thousand-stitch sash created by community members that served as an amulet for a soldier at war, and traditional Japanese geta sandals created for a son by his father that feature Mickey Mouse.<br /></p> <p>This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center.<br /></p> <p>#APA2018</p> <p><br /></p>
Ashley Naranjo
9
 

Scientific Instrument Collection: Exploring Acoustics

<p>This collection includes videos demonstrating key principles of the science of sound, using some of the Smithsonian's scientific instrument collection. These videos are paired with the Visible Thinking Routine, "What's going on? What do you see (or hear) that makes you say that?" as a way to check for understanding. Learners can select one or more of the videos to watch and then provide their interpretation of what's happening and support it with a justification from the video. Learners can also explore additional short experiments, under the heading "Additional Resources" to further understand these principles in action.  #SmithsonianMusic</p>
Ashley Naranjo
21
 

Scientists, Inventors, and Entrepreneurs: Women Who Shaped History

<p>This topical collection includes resources related to featured women scientists, inventors and entrepreneurs. This collection includes portraits of the scientists, inventors and entrepreneurs, related artifacts, articles, videos with experts, and related Smithsonian Learning Lab collections. Use this collection to launch lessons about the women's life stories, primary source analysis, and examination of the context in which these women lived and made their contributions. This collection is not comprehensive but rather provides a launching point for research and study. <br /></p> <p>Keywords: Mae Carol Jemison, Grace Hopper, Ellena Ocha, Maria Sibylla Merian, Madam CJ Walker, Charlotta Bass, Dr. Nancy Grace Roman, Ursula Marvin, Valentina Tereshokova, #BecauseOfHerStory<br /></p>
Ashley Naranjo
62
 

Second Opinion: Forging the Future – Smithsonian Resources

<p>This is a Smithsonian Learning Lab topical collection, which contains interdisciplinary education resources, including student interactives, videos, images and blogs to complement the Smithsonian's national conversation on global climate change, highlighted on <em><a href="http://www.smithsonianmag.com/second-opinion/second-opinion-education-resources-180963599/">Second Opinion</a></em><strong>. </strong> Use this sample of the Smithsonian's many resources to introduce or augment your study of this topic and spark a conversation. </p>
Ashley Naranjo
29
 

Smithsonian Video Resources in American Sign Language

This collection includes a growing number of educational video resources in American Sign Language, including the ArtSigns series from the Smithsonian American Art Museum, the story behind an unusual object at the National Museum of American History, the Two Inch Universe from the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, as well as a performance from the National Museum of American Indian, and storytelling at the Smithsonian's Folklife Festival.
Ashley Naranjo
39
 

Snowflakes in Wilson A. Bentley's Collection

<p>This topical collection includes images from Wilson A. Bentley's snowflake photography collection, which was donated to the Smithsonian in 1903. Bentley used a bellows camera that had a microscope inside to capture these small and unique natural objects. Also included in the collection is the original correspondence between Bentley and the Smithsonian, as well as ideas for using these sources in the classroom from the Smithsonian Institution Archives.</p>
Ashley Naranjo
26
 

Spotting Symbols in the Lansdowne Portrait of George Washington

Learning resource collection, which includes an iconic portrait of George Washington, filled with symbols that tell a story about early America and its first leader. Explore the ways that the artist uses symbols in the portrait to tell about the subject’s life, personality, and achievements.
Ashley Naranjo
7