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Ashley Naranjo

Manager of Educator Engagement and Strategic Partnerships
Smithsonian Institution
Smithsonian Staff
Manager of Educator Engagement and Strategic Partnerships

Ashley Naranjo, M.Ed. is a museum educator, specializing in the use of digital resources for teaching and learning. She currently manages distance learning initiatives and education partnerships for the Smithsonian. She has developed and implemented professional development opportunities for teachers, librarians and fellow museum educators since 2011. Before coming to the Smithsonian, she has had experiences in education in both formal and informal learning spaces: as an ESOL instructor for adults, a middle school teacher in the humanities and a summer programs administrator. She holds a B.A. in Human Development (Developmental Psychology) from the Lynch School of Education at Boston College, where she was a research assistant and independent study student in the Laboratory of Thinking, Learning & Cognition in the Arts. She completed a M.Ed. in Learning Design and Technology from the Rossier School of Education at the University of Southern California, with a thesis entitled, “Using Digital Museum Resources in the Classroom”. She is a 2019 graduate of the Getty Leadership Institute’s NextGen of Museum Leaders program.

Email: learning@si.edu | Twitter: https://twitter.com/SmithsonianEdu

Ashley Naranjo's collections

 

Isamu Noguchi

<p>This topical collection includes a portrait of Isamu Noguchi, a 20th-century Japanese American artist and architect and a National Portrait Gallery "Portrait Spotlight" with background information and suggested questions for the classroom. Additional resources include blog posts from the Smithsonian American Art Museum about his work and a small sample of Noguchi's sculptures from the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden and the Smithsonian American Art Museum. </p> <p>Teachers and students may use this collection as a springboard for classroom discussions about Noguchi and his artworks and for further research. </p> <p>Keywords: Asian American, sculptor, landscape artist, public works, <em>Okame</em>, <em>Grey Sun</em>, <em>Lunar Landscape</em>, <em>Composition</em>, <em>Cronos</em>, <em>Akari</em>, <em>Mother and Child</em></p><p><em>This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. </em> </p> <p> #APA2018</p>
Ashley Naranjo
19
 

Jazz Resources for Preschool Students

<p>Resources to support two year olds learning about jazz music and musicians. Includes portraits of Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington, Billie Holiday, Ella Fitzgerald and Miles Davis. Students connect the musician to their instrument, identify the parts of a trumpet and listen to Louis Armstrong's "What a Wonderful World" to identify specific instruments in the song. Smithsonian Early Enrichment Center's blog includes an interview with the teacher who originally created and implemented the lesson. Included here are supporting resources of the elements mentioned in her interview.</p><p>#SmithsonianMusic<br /></p>
Ashley Naranjo
13
 

Larry Itliong: Breaking Barriers in the Labor Movement

<p>Larry Itliong (October 25, 1913- February 8, 1977) was a Filipino American labor organizer. Itliong immigrated to the United States in 1929 at the age of fifteen. He worked throughout the country as a farm laborer and in the salmon canneries of Alaska. In response to oppressive treatment of Filipino farmworkers, Itliong organized labor strikes. He contacted Cesar Chavez and asked Mexican farmworkers to join the strike with Filipino farmworkers. He believed that all workers had to stand together in their fight for justice. The National Farm Workers Association (NFWA) voted unanimously and Mexican farmworkers joined Filipino farmworkers in the Great Delano Grape Strike. A year later, AWOC and NFWA merged to become the United Farm Workers (UFW). The Delano Grape Strike lasted for five years. As director of the UFW, Chavez took the limelight, but co-founder and former assistant director Larry Itliong has been cast in the historical shadows.</p> <p>The media and sources in this collection can be used alongside the <em>National History Day SEARCH Historical Context Graphic Organizer</em> and the <em>Ethnic Studies Praxis Story Plot </em>from the Journey for Justice Teachers' Guide. Both resources help students think critically about Larry Itliong's life, accomplishments and activism and help provide context for the labor movement more broadly.</p> <p>#NHD #NHD2020 #EthnicStudies *This collection was created to support Unit 2: What is the history?, <em>Civil Rights Movements </em>of the Austin ISD Ethnic Studies Part A course.</p> <p><em>This Smithsonian Learning Lab collection received Federal support from the Asian Pacific American Initiatives Pool, administered by the Smithsonian Asian Pacific American Center. </em><br /></p>
Ashley Naranjo
11
 

Learning to Look: Letter from Artist Yasuo Kuniyoshi, after the Japanese Attack on Pearl Harbor

<p>This collection includes student activities and learning to look questions, as well as additional teacher resources for extending the lesson. Students will use the primary sources to understand the changing perspectives and perceptions of Japanese Americans in the World War II era.</p> <p>Keywords: Japanese Incarceration, George Biddle, Franklin D. Roosevelt, WW2, WWII, analysis, written response, essay, text, Max Yavno, Pearl Harbor, Works Progress Administration (WPA)</p> <p>#APA2018 #EthnicStudies</p> <p><em>#historicalthinking</em></p> <p><br /></p>
Ashley Naranjo
12
 

Letters from the Japanese American Incarceration

<p>Teaching guide based on letters from young people in an Arizona incarceration camp to a librarian, Miss Breed, in their hometown of San Diego. Students piece together a story by comparing these primary-source documents—documents that help to show that history is never a single story. Students should consider what life was like for these Japanese American youth as American citizens, whose families were unfoundedly considered a national security threat and lost many of their freedoms during the incarceration era.</p> <p>Further context for Executive Order 9066 is available in the National Museum of American History's exhibition, "<em><a href="http://americanhistory.si.edu/righting-wrong-japanese-americans-and-world-war-ii" target="_blank">Righting a Wrong: Japanese Americans and World War II</a>". </em>Additional historic photographs, documents, newspapers, letters and other primary source materials on this topic can be found via Densho Digital Repository, <a href="http://ddr.densho.org/">http://ddr.densho.org</a>. </p> <p>Keywords: forced removal, incarceration camp, internment camp, Asian American, Japanese American Internment, 1940s, World War 2 </p> <p>#APA2018</p><p><em>#historicalthinking</em></p><p><br /></p>
Ashley Naranjo
13
 

Liberty Bonds of World War I (WW1)

<p>This collection presents three different <em>liberty bonds</em> primary sources dating from 1918: a postcard, sheet music/song, and a celebrity aviator's brochure. With these resources students will explore <em>L</em><em>iberty Bonds<span></span></em>, also called war bonds or liberty loans, which were essentially loans from the American people to the U.S. government to fund the Allies' involvement in World War I. Many public campaigns presented purchasing bonds as the patriotic way to support the war from the home front. Carefully chosen words and imagery conveyed this message and persuaded Americans to act quickly, through both subtle and direct messaging. </p> <p><u>Essential questions:</u> What role did Liberty Bonds play in financing the U.S. WWI effort? How did persuasive language techniques and visuals lead many Americans to see Liberty Bonds as part of their patriotic duty on the home front? </p> <p><u>Keywords:<span></span></u> primary source, secondary source, soldiers, World War I, Great War, Ruth Law, "What are you going to do to help the boys?", army, military, Uncle Sam, WWI, persuasion, advertising</p> <p>This collection was created in conjunction with the National Postal Museum's "My Fellow Soldiers: Letters from World War I" teacher workshop (July 19, 2017). It focuses on one of the many postcards from <a href="https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/my-fellow-soldiers-postcards-from-world-war-i/HPrCVWkR1wqjpK3k#r" target="_blank" style="background-color:rgb(63,63,63);">this topical collection</a> to demonstrate its use in the secondary classroom. #NPMTeacherPrograms<br /></p><p><em>#historicalthinking</em></p><p><br /></p>
Ashley Naranjo
6
 

Music Innovation: How Technology Has Helped to Change Music Over Time

<p>This topical collection provides examples of places, objects and people connecting music and STEM for a teacher professional development workshop hosted by the National Museum of African American History and Culture. During the workshop, teachers explored popular music, the creation of Hip-Hop and the technological advances needed for it to become what it is today. Teachers and students may use this collection as a springboard for the classroom. This collection is not comprehensive, but rather provides a launching point for research and study. #SmithsonianMusic</p>
Ashley Naranjo
67
 

My Fellow Soldiers: Postcards from World War I

<p>This topical collection features more than a dozen postcards that were distributed during the World War I era. These postcards will serve as inspiration and a starting point for teacher-created Smithsonian Learning Lab collections during the National Postal Museum's workshop, "<a href="https://postalmuseum.si.edu/education/professional-development/index.html" target="_blank">My Fellow Soldiers: Letters from World War I</a>" (July 2017). </p><p>#NPMTeacherPrograms</p>
Ashley Naranjo
21
 

My Smithsonian Closet

<p>This collection serves as an example of how you might create your own grouping of objects and visuals that inspire your own fashion choices, while also practicing research skills in mind mapping to improve your online search results.</p><p>Consider the following questions:</p><ul><li>What Smithsonian objects would you put in your closet? </li><li>What surrounds your closet? </li><li>What inspires your closet?</li></ul> <ol><li>Learn more about this #SmithsonianEdu Challenge prompt by reading this blog post, featuring collections created by three previous Cooper Hewitt National Design Award winners <a href="https://s.si.edu/EduChallengeCloset">https://s.si.edu/EduChallengeCloset</a></li><li>Try it out for yourself. How might mind mapping search terms provide unique search results and serendipitous finds for your own collection response? How can these objects inspire creativity? How can these visuals help tell a story? </li><li>Add <a href="https://learninglab.si.edu/search/?f%5B_types%5D%5B%5D=ll_collection&st=%23mysmithsoniancloset&s=updated_at_desc&page=1">#MySmithsonianCloset</a> to your collection description and it will be added to a growing list of collections in response to this prompt. </li></ol>
Ashley Naranjo
36
 

Niagara Falls: Investigating Change Over Time with a Body of Water

<p>Learning resource collection, which highlights several artworks and photographs of Niagara Falls as early as 1820 to today. It introduces close-looking strategies, with a consistent set of guiding questions to analyze each image and discover changes of a place, specifically three waterfalls on the United States-Canada border, over time.</p>
Ashley Naranjo
19
 

"Nightstand Portraits": A Burton Morris-inspired Activity

This teaching resource collection includes an activity, (created by the Heinz History Center's Education Manager, Mariruth Leftwich), highlighting Pittsburgh-native pop artist Burton Morris' "Nightstand Portraits" series as a springboard for students to create their own imaginary "Nightstand Portrait". This could be a portrait of themselves, a historical figure, or even an icebreaker activity for students to introduce each other to the rest of the class.
Ashley Naranjo
8
 

Objects that Changed the Way We Live

In this collection, we'll explore everyday objects and their impacts on society. Students can begin by reading an illustrated essay from the National Museum of American History highlighting objects that capture several pivotal moments in innovation. Included in this collection are the clock, the iPod, the bicycle and the cellular phone. What other objects have changed the way we lived?
Ashley Naranjo
11