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Ashley Naranjo

Manager of Educator Engagement and Strategic Partnerships
Smithsonian Institution
Smithsonian Staff
Manager of Educator Engagement and Strategic Partnerships

Ashley Naranjo, M.Ed. is a museum educator, specializing in the use of digital resources for teaching and learning. She currently manages distance learning initiatives and education partnerships for the Smithsonian. She has developed and implemented professional development opportunities for teachers, librarians and fellow museum educators since 2011. Before coming to the Smithsonian, she has had experiences in education in both formal and informal learning spaces: as an ESOL instructor for adults, a middle school teacher in the humanities and a summer programs administrator. She holds a B.A. in Human Development (Developmental Psychology) from the Lynch School of Education at Boston College, where she was a research assistant and independent study student in the Laboratory of Thinking, Learning & Cognition in the Arts. She completed a M.Ed. in Learning Design and Technology from the Rossier School of Education at the University of Southern California, with a thesis entitled, “Using Digital Museum Resources in the Classroom”. She is a 2019 graduate of the Getty Leadership Institute’s NextGen of Museum Leaders program.

Email: learning@si.edu | Twitter: https://twitter.com/SmithsonianEdu

Ashley Naranjo's collections

 

Creative Writing Exercise: Photograph Analysis for Descriptive Writing

This collection is adapted from a teacher's original collection of seven photographs of a single person, spanning several decades of the 20th century. In this activity, students can express their unique responses to the photographs in the collection by writing stories inspired by the people in them. Before they put their imaginations to work, students will have a chance to get to know the photographs by observing them closely, making a list of details, and writing a description of each. Such an exercise will help them understand the value of careful observation as a precursor to descriptive and creative writing.
Ashley Naranjo
14
 

"Crossing the Delaware": Who is portrayed in American history?

<p>This collection highlights variations on a theme through works of art: George Washington Crossing the Delaware, George Washington Carver Crossing the Delaware and Shimomura Crossing the Delaware. Comparisons of these works could serve as springboards for discussions about identity, immigration, "master" or dominant narratives in history, and hero myths.</p> <p>#EthnicStudies</p>
Ashley Naranjo
7
 

Declaration of Independence Resources

A topical collection of resources related to the Declaration of Independence that provides context. (1) Jefferson's mobile desk, on which the Declaration was drafted, (2) the scene of its drafting, (3) the audio and text of the document, (4) a lesson plan focuses on how it came about, how it was designed and the compromises that were necessary, (5) an online exhibition featuring Thomas Paine and his pamphlet 'Common Sense', another resource on what led to the Declaration, and (6) a commemorative bandanna of the original document suggests how the Declaration was valued.
Ashley Naranjo
9
 

Flashcard Activity: Defining Portraiture

<p>This collection can be used online or printed out so that each student receives a portrait to examine. In looking closely at their assigned portraits, students might ask questions, such as: Can a portrait be of a character vs. a real person? Does a portrait have to include a person's face? Does the sitter have to know the portrait is being created? What forms can a portrait take? These questions might help them in creating a list of attributes of portraiture. Students can then compare with their classmates and compare and contrast how their lists of characteristics might differ. By first examining one of the portraits in depth and then examining a breadth of portraits together, the class might work together to create a common definition for "portraiture". Students may be interested in comparing their common definition with a National Portrait Gallery curator's take on "Defining Portraiture: How are portraits both fact and fiction?" in the video included at the end of this collection <a href="https://learninglab.si.edu/resources/view/60783#more-info">https://learninglab.si.edu/resources/view/60783#more-info</a></p><p>This activity works equally well online or using printed flashcards (see the <a href="https://learninglab.si.edu/collections/defining-portraiture/n5fLJjkXzRe4xBd5#r/470937" target="_blank">resource tile</a>). <br /></p>
Ashley Naranjo
56
 

Flashcard Activity: See, Think, Wonder with Science-Related Images

<p>This collection contains illustrations, sketches, paintings, sculpture and photographs representing a variety of science-related concepts, including animal adaptations, the invention process and climate change. </p> <p>They may be used for a variety of purposes; here, we use them as a catalyst for discussion.  In small groups or as a classroom, have students select one artwork they find meaningful or interesting and discuss the following:</p> <ol><li>Why did you pick this image?  </li><li>What do you see?  Name specific aspects of the image you notice.</li><li>What do you think about what you see?</li><li>What does this image make you wonder? </li></ol><p>This activity works equally well online or using printed flashcards (see <a href="http://learninglab.si.edu/q/ll-c/wCjeBXbgRgExR2Py#r/424391">the resource tile</a>).  You may also replace or pair the above activity with a Project Zero Thinking Routine found in the final section of the collection. </p> <p>Keywords: printable, flash card, project zero visible thinking routine, New Jersey Principals and Supervisors Association, NJPSA, arts integration, natural history, animals, invention, patent, portraits, weather</p>
Ashley Naranjo
47
 

Forensic Anthropology: Bone Basics

Learning resource collection introducing the skeletal characteristics that can help us identify young and old, male or female, and ancestry. This collection was created with the Anthropology team at the National Museum of Natural History. (http://anthropology.si.edu/writteninbone/bone_basics.html )
Ashley Naranjo
16
 

Go-go: The Heartbeat of Washington, D.C.

<p>This thematic collection includes videos of performances, oral histories and short articles to support opportunities for listening, evaluating and connecting to Go-go music. These resources could be integrated into lessons and activities, supporting a deeper understanding of historical and social context for a genre of music originating in Washington, D.C.</p> <p></p> <p>Keywords: DCPS, Chuck Brown, oral history, performance, concert, music, #DontMuteDC, Gogo, Go go</p>
Ashley Naranjo
8
 

Highlights Collection: Astronomy Learning Resources

<p>This is a Smithsonian Learning Lab topical collection, which contains images, text, and other multimedia resources that may complement the Tween Tribune feature, <em><a href="https://www.tweentribune.com/article/teen/barns-are-painted-red-because-physics-dying-stars/">Barns are painted red because of the physics of dying stars</a></em>. Use these resources to introduce or augment your study of this topic. If you want to personalize this collection by changing or adding content, click the Sign Up link above to create a free account.  If you are already logged in, click the copy button to initiate your own version. Learn more <a href="https://learninglab.si.edu/create" target="_blank">here</a>. <br /></p><p><br /></p>
Ashley Naranjo
30
 

Highlights Collection: Mystery Learning Resources

<p>This is a Smithsonian Learning Lab topical collection, which contains images, text, and other multimedia resources that may complement the Tween Tribune feature, <em><a href="https://www.tweentribune.com/article/teen/without-edgar-allan-poe-we-wouldnt-have-sherlock-holmes/">Without Edgar Allan Poe, we wouldn't have Sherlock Holmes</a>.</em> Use these resources to introduce or augment your study of this topic. If you want to personalize this collection by changing or adding content, click the Sign Up link above to create a free account.  If you are already logged in, click the copy button to initiate your own version. Learn more <a href="https://learninglab.si.edu/create" target="_blank">here</a>.  </p> <p><a href="https://learninglab.si.edu/create"></a></p>
Ashley Naranjo
36
 

Iconic Pittsburgh Images, Paired with Project Zero Routines

<p>Includes iconic people, places, and things associated with Pittsburgh. </p> <p>Prior to the workshop series, select one resource from this collection and conduct an adapted <strong>See-Wonder-Connect</strong> routine (What do you see in the resource that's worth noticing? What do you wonder about? What connections do you make to it?). You may consider sharing with a partner, using the <strong>Think-Pair-Share</strong> routine. Finally, <strong>Imagine if...</strong> you were using one of these resources in your own practice, what would you have students do with it? </p> <p>This collection was created for the <em>Smithsonian Learning Lab</em> workshops in Pittsburgh and the surrounding school districts. Funded by the Grable Foundation and in partnership with the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, the Quaker Valley School district and the Washington International School. <br /></p> <p>#<a href="https://learninglab.si.edu/search?st=pzpgh&amp;st_op=and&amp;item_type=collections">PZPGH</a></p>
Ashley Naranjo
45
 

Identifying Bird Beak Types through Robert Ridgway's Drawings

<p>Birds' beaks tell a lot about them, especially where they find their food and how they eat it. This collection includes a bird curator’s drawings that clearly show the different kinds of beaks, which evolved because they are good for breaking seeds, catching insects or filtering out shrimp or algae.</p> <p>Keywords: scientific illustration, sketches</p>
Ashley Naranjo
18
 

Image Analysis: "Girl at Gee's Bend, Alabama" by Arthur Rothstein

<p>Developing an inquiry-based strategy to support students can allow them to investigate objects and images as historians do. In this example, students try to reveal the story behind the image. They raise questions for their own further research. Because the image has only a title, the photographer's name, the "sitter"'s name, the place and the date, students have to rely on their own analysis of evidence in the image, rather than someone else's interpretation. When they read the expert's analysis, they will have already considered many of the elements that the expert highlights and can compare their interpretations. </p><p>"Girl at Gee's Bend, Alabama" is a provocative photograph that can be used in discussions ranging from history of the South during the Great Depression, to social justice. </p>
Ashley Naranjo
3