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Jean-Marie Galing

Art Resource Teacher
Fairfax County Public Schools
Primary (5 to 8 years old), Elementary (9 to 12 years old), Middle School (13 to 15 years old), High School (16 to 18 years old)
Teacher/Educator, Curriculum Developer
Visual Arts, Arts :

Jean-Marie Galing's collections

 

Playgrounds

<p>Images support learning in primary grade paper sculpture lessons.</p>
Jean-Marie Galing
9
 

Community Neighborhoods

<p>Images support learning in art lessons about the big idea of Community. Compare/contrast urban, suburban, and rural communities. What do all communities have in common?</p><p>Activity: Print selected images on 8.5" x 11" card stock and laminate. Cut each image into several pieces. Number the backs of the pieces and place in a zip-lock bag with the same number. </p><p>Each student receives a puzzle piece and must work with their small group to re-assemble the image. Then make a list of clues about the community depicted. As each group shares their lists, the teacher records responses. Duplicate responses get a tally mark next to the word. </p><p>Teacher can then lead a discussion about what makes a community and help students make connections to similarities with their own local community.</p>
Jean-Marie Galing
13
 

Portraits of Children

<p>Images support primary grade portraiture lessons.</p>
Jean-Marie Galing
22
 

Maps

Jean-Marie Galing
8
 

Animal Sculptures

<p>Images support second grade paper sculpture lesson. View a few images and lead a discussion with questioning:</p><ul><li>What do you notice about this picture?</li><li>Where do you think this is located?</li><li>If you were here and saw this animal, what would you be thinking?</li><li>Why do you think the artist chose to put this animal in this spot?</li><li>How do you think the animal affects people who use this space?</li><li>Can you think of a space in your community where an artist might place an animal sculpture?</li></ul>
Jean-Marie Galing
7
 

Celebrate Good Times

<p>Images support second grade collage lesson. Choose an image that connects to a poem read to students (from <em>Celebrate American in Poetry in Art,</em> edited by Nora Panzer). Use questioning to describe and analyze the artwork: </p><ul><li>"What do you see?" </li><li>"What is happening here? </li><li><span></span>"What clues make you think that?"</li><li> "What else is happening in this image?" </li></ul><p>Ask students to take a minute to think of a personal experience that this image reminds them of, then turn to a partner and share. This prepares them for the next step, which is to visualize a favorite community celebration and sketch in preparation for making a collage.</p>
Jean-Marie Galing
8
 

Postcard Places

Jean-Marie Galing
14
 

Textiles embroidered with plants

<p>Examples of embroidery depicting plants. Supports primary grade stichery lesson.</p>
Jean-Marie Galing
7
 

Family Fun

<p> There are many ways that families have fun together. Have you done some of these activities with your family? Draw or paint a picture of you and your family enjoying an activity together.</p>
Jean-Marie Galing
13
 

Animal Masks

<p>Allow small groups to "see/think/wonder" about a mask image:  Look and describe what you see. Based on what you see, what do you think the mask is for? What do you wonder about the mask (or want to learn about the mask)? Then allow students to click the Information button to learn more. Groups can report out to the whole class.</p> <p>Facilitate a discussion with students using some open ended questions:</p> <ul><li>Why do people make and wear masks? </li><li>What can be hidden or revealed using a mask?</li><li>What might a mask symbolize or stand for?</li><li>If you were to design a mask for a special purpose, what would it look like? </li></ul><p>Direct students to sketch their ideas to plan for creating a mask. </p> <p><br /></p> <p><br /></p>
Jean-Marie Galing
10
 

Landscapes

<p>Choose several images to compare/contrast in terms of location, season, and/or style. Discuss why artists may choose to depict a particular place.</p><p>Formal analysis for elementary students: identify foreground, middle ground and background; describe how size and placement of objects and use of overlapping contribute to the illusion of depth. </p><p>Formal analysis for secondary students: describe color harmonies; identify focal point; find examples of one-point, two point, and atmospheric perspective. </p>
Jean-Marie Galing
29
 

Play

Jean-Marie Galing
14