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Jean-Marie Galing

Art Resource Teacher
Fairfax County Public Schools
Primary (5 to 8 years old), Elementary (9 to 12 years old), Middle School (13 to 15 years old), High School (16 to 18 years old)
Teacher/Educator, Curriculum Developer
Visual Arts, Arts :

Jean-Marie Galing's collections

 

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Jean-Marie Galing
14
 

Art & Culture Guessing Game

<p>1. Can you guess who made these? Look at each picture and decide which type of maker created it:      Painter, Sculptor, Potter, Printmaker, Weaver, Architect</p> <p>2. Can you guess what culture or time these things are from?  Write your guess, then click on the picture. Click the  <strong>i  </strong>symbol to learn the answer.</p> <p>3. Choose a picture and tell why  you think this object is special or useful.</p> <p>4.  How do you think it expresses something important to the people of that culture?</p>
Jean-Marie Galing
24
 

Museum Architecture

<p><em>How does the design of a museum . . . </em></p> <ul><li>reflect the time in which it was built?</li><li>reflect its purpose?</li><li>reflect the values of society?</li><li> fit in (or not) with the surrounding community? </li></ul><p><em>How does the interior design affect the way people experience the space?</em></p>
Jean-Marie Galing
30
 

Woodcut Portraits

Jean-Marie Galing
14
 

Family Fun

<p> There are many ways that families have fun together. Have you done some of these activities with your family? Draw or paint a picture of you and your family enjoying an activity together.</p>
Jean-Marie Galing
13
 

Human Figure

<p>This collection supports learning in the Grade 4 gesture drawing and wire sculpture lessons. Activities:</p> <ul><li>Realism vs. Abstraction: students sort sculptures of the human figure into two categories (realistic or abstract). Describe the ways that some artists abstract the human figure.</li><li>Compare contrast 2D/3D: identify the shapes an artist used to portray the human figure in a gesture drawing, then identify the equivalent forms used in a sculpture. Record findings in a T-chart.</li></ul><p><br /></p>
Jean-Marie Galing
20
 

Georgia O'Keeffe

Jean-Marie Galing
11
 

William H. Johnson

Jean-Marie Galing
12
 

Figural Sculptures

Jean-Marie Galing
21
 

Art & Culture Sort

<p>First, sort the images by type of art/artist. Teacher should make index card headings for the following categories: Painting/Painter, Textile/Weaver, Clothing/Fashion Designer, Architecture/Architect, Prints/Printmaker, Sculpture/Sculptor, Functional Ceramics/Potter or Ceramist. Sometimes an image may cross categories (painting of a house might be categorized in architecture or painting); either answer would be acceptable if the student can justify why.</p><p>Second, make an educated guess about culture represented in selected images. Students can "guess and check" with teacher. Online research option: students work in pairs to access this collection and click on the info button for an image to learn about the maker, time period, and culture. They can record their findings to help answer the reflection questions below.</p><p>After the sorting activities, ask students to choose an image and answer: <em> Why is/was this object of value (or useful)? How do you think it expresses something important to the people of that culture? </em></p>
Jean-Marie Galing
26
 

Alma Thomas: Collection of Colors

<p>Images support discussion of art portfolios and collections with elementary students. </p> <p>See - Think - Wonder</p> <p>1.  What do you see?</p> <p>2. What does it make you think of?</p> <p>3. What do you wonder about them, or what would you like to know more about these artworks?</p> <p>Further discussion questions:</p><ul><li>What do these artworks have in common?</li><li>Do you think they were created by the same artist?</li><li>Why might an artist develop a collection or portfolio of their work?</li><li>If you collect or make things, how would you like to share it with others?</li></ul>
Jean-Marie Galing
12
 

Celebrate Good Times

<p>Images support second grade collage lesson. Choose an image that connects to a poem read to students (from <em>Celebrate American in Poetry in Art,</em> edited by Nora Panzer). Use questioning to describe and analyze the artwork: </p><ul><li>"What do you see?" </li><li>"What is happening here? </li><li><span></span>"What clues make you think that?"</li><li> "What else is happening in this image?" </li></ul><p>Ask students to take a minute to think of a personal experience that this image reminds them of, then turn to a partner and share. This prepares them for the next step, which is to visualize a favorite community celebration and sketch in preparation for making a collage.</p>
Jean-Marie Galing
8